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The Lion and the Mouse

The Lion and the Mouse

Written by Jerry Pinkney

Narrated by Uncredited


The Lion and the Mouse

Written by Jerry Pinkney

Narrated by Uncredited

ratings:
4.5/5 (122 ratings)
Length:
9 minutes
Released:
Jan 1, 2010
ISBN:
9780545521789
Format:
Audiobook

Description

In this wordless adaptation of one of Aesop’s most beloved fables, an unlikely pair learn that no act of kindness is ever wasted. With vivid depictions of the landscape of the African Serengeti, Pinkney makes this a truly special retelling.

Released:
Jan 1, 2010
ISBN:
9780545521789
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Jerry Pinkney is the author and illustrator of many books for young readers, including The Lion and the Mouse, for which he earned the Caldecott Medal. He been the recipient of five Caldecott Honors, five Coretta Scott King Awards, four Coretta Scott King Honors, five New York Times Best Illustrated Book awards, and many other awards. Mr. Pinkney and his wife, author Gloria Jean Pinkney, live in New York.


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Reviews

What people think about The Lion and the Mouse

4.7
122 ratings / 161 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    The Lion and the Mouse by Jerry Pinkney is an adaptation of one of Aesop's fables. The only words in the book are the sounds the animals make. The beautiful illustrations tell the story. This book won the 2010 Caldecott Award. There are lessons to be learned from this fable. One is that no act of kindness is ever wasted. Another is that even a small creature like a mouse can help a big creature like a lion. Size matters not. This book would be good for nursery school children and kindergartners to learn about being kind to others.
  • (5/5)
    Lion and the Mouse is Jerry Pinkney's most celebrated book. He takes Aesop's tale and turns it into an almost completely wordless book where the watercolor illustrations draw the reader in to tell the story. A little mouse accidently finds refuge when it runs up the back of a lion trying to get away from an owl. The lion could kill the mouse but shows mercy and sets it free. When the lion is later caught in a net left by hunters, the mouse comes to the rescue and gnaws the lion free. It's a tale of friendship and kindness. Not to mention a delight for the eyes.
  • (5/5)
    SummaryThis book of the Lion and the Mouse has no words other than a few animal noises but the beautifully illustrated pictures tell the story. Instead of having a meal, the lion spares the mouse's life and in return the mouse comes to the lions rescue when he is caught in a rope trap hanging helpless in the trees. This classic fable tells of no matter your size, helping other goes a long ways.Personal ReactionI love how each time you open this book another version of kindness is told through this wordless picture bookClassroom Extension ideasLesson on acts of kindnessPoaching animals is wrongHelping others even when it's difficult
  • (5/5)
    What a beautifully rendered interpretation of Aesop's Fable - and all without words!Jerry Pinkney perfectly captures the expressions of his characters, from desperate and terrified to joyous and content.Every library, home and school, should feature this offering of this remarkable story.
  • (5/5)
    Gorgeous!!!
  • (5/5)
    Beautiful illustrations
  • (4/5)
    Wonderful illustrations of a favorite Aesop's fable! Delightful!
  • (4/5)
    I personally thought this The Lion & The Mouse was a wonderful book, it takes reading to a whole need level. This book is wordless so the pictures tells the story. The book has some unsuspecting moments where you think something is going to happen, and it does not. I would highly recommend using this book in my future classroom, because of the pictures that were presented in the book. Great book for students to use their minds on what they think is going on in the book.
  • (4/5)
    The book, The Lion & The Mouse, a mouse is chased by a lion and ends up hiding on the back of a lion. The lion finds the mouse but the lion graciously releases the mouse. Then, the lion gets caught in a trap that was set up by hunters. The mouse sees the lion and helps him escape by chewing through the rope. At the end of the story the mouse and lions family are spending time together. The book is a great story because, even though there are little to no worries the message is extremely clear. It teaches children that they must work together and learn to help others even if they seem to be an unlikely companion. Children realize that mice and lions are not typically friends so this book shows that just because you don't think someone will be your friend doesn't mean that they won't be. An extension of the book could be for other animals in their environment to see that the mouse and the lion are friends and many other unexpected animals could become friends as well. Another extension could be that someone else in the lion and the mouse's family was in a bad situation and they helped them out and how they had set a positive example for their family.
  • (5/5)
    A classic Aesop fable! A lion captures a mouse but spares him and does not eat him. Later, the lion is captured in a trap and the same mouse comes to his recuse. This wordless book allows for the reader to create their own story line and use their imagination. A captivating tale that I will always love!
  • (4/5)
    This beautifully illustrated and wordless rendition of Aesop's tale of a lion who spares the life of a mouse. The lion is later rewarded for his compassionate act by being rescued from poachers by the persistence of his mouse friend who chews him free of a net. In this book, Pinkney brilliantly illustrates the wildlife on the Serengeti plains. The interconnectedness of the ecosystem is as much a part of the story as the kindness extended in the saving of lives by the lion and mouse. The detailed illustrations lend themselves well to all ages and the moral of the story is a valuable and ageless lesson for children.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite books ever since I laid eyes on it. A wordless story about two unlikely animals who both play an important part in each others lives. One day the mouse is out and about and the lion almost eats him. However, he spares his life. Later on, the lion is caught by a trap and the mouse helps save him from the net. A story of helping each other out and making new friends in unexpected places.
  • (5/5)
    I really like this book because it is an old story that we have seen before. I like Jerry Pinkey's telling of it though because you can feel the sense of family that he puts between the mouse and the lion. I think that it is important for children to see that just because you look different does not mean that you can not like and care about one another. I think this is a super important lesson to provide to students and I would love to use this book in my future classroom.
  • (5/5)
    I would recommend for grades pre-k to 3. This book is pictures only. You have to use your imagination about what is going on. The illustrations which is done in watercolor points you in the direction of the story, but in some areas are at the reader's discretion.
  • (3/5)
    opps! The mouse has awoken the lion and that lion is not happy. Being very angry he picks up the tiny mouse and wraps his big claws around him. That poor little mouse is so scared and hes hoping that he will be set free. The mouse tells him I will repay you if you let me go. The lion laughs and decides to let the mouse go. Later on the lion gets trapped with rope. Mouse comes to his rescue and chews through the rope setting the lion free. This is a great book to read to children when teaching about good deeds. This shows children that doing something nice for someone can result in something nice done for them.
  • (5/5)
    A couple of months ago, there was a display at the library of biographical works about various illustrators. Jerry Pinkney was one featured, and I'd never heard of him before, so we went to the "ILLUST" section and picked up this book. My children love the beautiful illustrations and the stories that we tell based on them. Usually I find illustration-only books to be more pressure than I want (you know, to tell the story in my own words rather than just reading what's on the page), but I found it so easy to tell the story from Pinkney's illustrations, I actually found that my memory populated the book with print in between readings. Whenever I opened it up, I was a little surprised to find that there were no words there since they came so easily when I "read" the book to my kids.

    I suspect that this book is at least partly responsible for my recently discovered comfort making up and telling a nightly story about my three-year-old son hiking in the woods. I also suspect that the stories that my son is telling during the day are part of the do-it-yourself storytelling this book has helped open up in our home. Not that it's the only responsible party, but it does play into and support that tendency in my children and myself. And that, to me, is the sign of a great book.
  • (5/5)
    This is a straight picture book with the only words being that of what the sounds the animals make. It tells a story about a lion and a mouse, and I will definitely use this book in my classroom one day.
  • (5/5)
    In The Lion & the Mouse, Jerry Pinkney retells Aesop's fable using beautiful illustrations. Children are able to understand the story and its lesson solely through the colorful and captivating images Pinkney uses. The Lion and the Mouse is set in the African Serengeti, where a lion spares the mouse's life, and later the mouse returns the favor by freeing the lion from a trap.This book would be a great way to introduce Aesop's fable to a younger generation. It would also be interesting to do a comparison of the original fable and Pinkney's illustrated version. Students may make interesting correlations, and it would make an easy transition to a discussion of author's purpose and its effect.
  • (5/5)
    This is a wordless picture book that follows a small animal doing a very brave thing. The lion has let go of the mouse and the next day the mouse finds the lion caught up in a trap. Instead of leaving the lion, the mouse chews through the ropes and frees the lion. The message of the book is so beautiful and I think students of all ages would really enjoy this book.
  • (5/5)
    This version of The Lion and the Mouse is amazing. I love the fact that their are minimal words in which they mimic a sound. This has always been a classic and a favorite of mine. The big ole intimidating lion helps a little mouse when he is being chased by an owl. The lion spares the mouse and lets him go. Well in return the mouse helps the lion when he gets caught in a trap. The mouse frees the lion by biting at the rope. This is a good lesson in helping others and this book will always be an all time favorite. Also how can I forget the award winning illustration. They are beautiful and since this is a picture book, the illustrations tell her story beautifully.
  • (5/5)
    With its beautiful pictures and a valuable lesson taught in the end the Lion and the Mouse is a great book to use your imagination to find out that having faith and trusting in some thigs might benfit you in the end. This is a great book to allow students to interact as everyone tries to "read" the pictures and realize that sometimes even the biggest and powerful people and animals can be helped by the smallest of things.
  • (5/5)
    The Lion & The Mouse is a brilliantly illustrated, wordless book about an unlikely friendship. It is the winner of a Caldecott Medal and it is easy to see why! The illustrations are extremely detailed and effectively tell the story, which can be hard to do without words. In the classroom setting, you could get the students involved by letting them write their own words for each page. It would be interesting to see what they would come up with! I loved this book and I will definitely keep it to read to my students one day.
  • (5/5)
    The Lion and the Mouse by Jerry Pinkney is a beautifully illustrated wordless picture book that is based on Aesop's popular fable. It tells the story through pictures alone of how a mouse and a lion, two very different animals, become friends. It won the Caldecott Award in 2010 and the Parents' Choice Gold Award in 2009. The illustrations in this book are my favorite part! You could use this book in a classroom and have students create their own story to go along with the illustrations in the book. You could also have your students create their own wordless picture book to share with the class.
  • (4/5)
    This is a true picture book! The animals make a few noiese but besides that the entire story is told through pictures. It's a wonderful tale of an unlikely friendship and the way they help each other. The book teaches the life skill of being kind to those around you by your actions. It would also be a great book for adding student created sentence strips under the story.
  • (4/5)
    The lion has caught his dinner in the grass. The lion played with the mouse but then decided that he was not going to eat him. So, the lion just let the mouse go. When the lion was exploring, he got caught in a trap. The mouse heard his cry for help and went running to the lion's rescue. The little bitty mouse cut his way through the rope with his teeth to free the lion. The lion and the mouse has become friends.
  • (5/5)
    The lion and the mouse are different as could be, but Pinkney's retelling of Aesop's classic tale shows readers how the two can help each other. The cover of the book depicts only the lion's expressive face and tawny mane, and the text itself is equally wordless. The only text which mars the intricate pencil on watercolor drawings are the sounds of the animals as they "Screeeech," "Scratch," and "RRROAARRRRRRRRR" their way through the tale. But the friendship and cooperation of the lion and the mouse plays out unmistakably against the backdrop of the African Serengeti. Furthermore, Pinkney subtly adds the theme of family to the tale's traditional commentary on the meek and the mighty. Although visually alluring enough to interest older children, this book might appeal especially to those youngsters who can tell a story but cannot yet read on their own. Recommended.
  • (5/5)
    I thought this book was wonderful. I love how the pictures tell the story and I am excited to have my students tell what is happening in ther own words, since it only has pictures.
  • (5/5)
    This book is a beautiful adaptation of one of Aesop's fablesby Jerry Pinkney. Through vivid illustrations, this story and its lesson comes across boldly in this wordless book. It's simple enough that my three year old neice could tell me what was happening in the story and make predictions. This book has a theme of kindness in the rarest of places by the most unexpected people/things. I loved this book and its beautiful pictures!*Caldecott Winner
  • (5/5)
    Beautifully illustrated depiction of the classic tale of the lion and the mouse. Wordless and well done.
  • (5/5)
    I read this with my 4 year old niece and it was amazing to see her tell the story in her words just by looking at the pictures! This is a great book with beautiful illustrations that allows children of all ages to imagine what the story is about.