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Passenger to Frankfurt

Passenger to Frankfurt

Written by Agatha Christie

Narrated by Hugh Fraser


Passenger to Frankfurt

Written by Agatha Christie

Narrated by Hugh Fraser

ratings:
3.5/5 (79 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jul 3, 2012
ISBN:
9780062231666
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as ebookEbook

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Description

Christie's superb stand-alone mystery, Passenger to Frankfurt, is a true masterwork of surprise and suspense, as a diplomat comes to the aid of a terrified woman in an airport, only to find that his identity has been stolen and his life is suddenly in serious jeopardy.

Sir Stafford Nye's flight home from Malaya takes an unprecedented twist when a young woman confides in him that someone is trying to kill her. In a moment of weakness, he agrees to lend her his passport. Unwittingly, the diplomat has put his own life on the line.

When he meets the mystery woman again, she is a different person, and he finds himself drawn into a battle against an invisible-and altogether more dangerous-enemy. . . .

Publisher:
Released:
Jul 3, 2012
ISBN:
9780062231666
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

Agatha Christie is known throughout the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies in English with another billion in over 70 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time and in any language, outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. She is the author of 80 crime novels and short story collections, 20 plays, and six novels written under the name of Mary Westmacott.



Reviews

What people think about Passenger to Frankfurt

3.3
79 ratings / 25 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (2/5)
    In the ’20s, Christie wrote several thrillers before she was firmly established as the ‘Queen of Crime’. None of them were amazing – indeed, we’ll see most of them coming up in the next couple of posts – but neither were any as misguided as this one, perhaps unwisely chosen to celebrate Christie’s 80th birthday. (It’s a wonder her reputation didn’t slide further during her last years.) A 'North by Northwest' scenario sees a diplomat caught up in what can only be described as a web of international intrigue (what else would you call it?), up against the usual world-domination seeking manic. So many questions… I just don’t care.
  • (4/5)
    Agatha Christie’s fans might not enjoy this book so much. It departs completely from Mrs. Christie’s style. (Actually, I find a lot of The Big Four in it.) First of all, it is a spy thriller—but not like other and older Christie’s spy thrillers. It reminded me a lot of Buchan’s books—especially The 39 Steps. So, if you don’t like old-fashioned spy thrillers, step away from the bookshelf! If you read Buchan and liked it, you will enjoy this book. Mrs. Christie was highly criticized, even ridiculed, when the book appeared. A fellow writer condemned its “idiotic conventions.” A highly condescending critic wondered if “the old dear” understood “the difference between a hippie and a skinhead.” But we will never know, because she never mentioned either in the book. (And I wonder if this critic actually read her book...) Another critic wrote that the plot was “inconceivable,” which is surprising, considering he was old enough to have heard of Hitler’s Youth. For him the book’s end was “incomprehensible muddle,” yet, it was clear to me. The same critic believed Mrs. Christie did not understand what “Third World” meant; yet it was clear she used it not with the connotation of “Third World Country,” but the (utopian) world the rebelled youths thought they were helping to create. It is clear that her critics never perused the pages of John Buchan; they would have been well informed had they bothered, instead of dishonorably belittling an eighty year-old extremely lucid lady. She was quite right when she described how the youths were being brainwashed: "against their mode of government; [...] their parental customs, [...] the religions in which they have been brought up." Just the way it is happening with our kids in schools and libraries nowadays. Incomprehensible muddle? I think not!
  • (2/5)
    This book confused me, it felt like "snippets" of conversations, ideas, circumstances here & there......

    The book begins w/ a man giving his overcloak & passport to a young woman, as she has convinced him that if she gets on her prearranged flight, that she will be killed..... So while she "steal" his things (so that she might take on his identity), he goes to the airport concession & purchases a stuffed panda for his niece.....................

    When he goes back to London, it is that he is in the Secret Service & everyone there is discombobulated not being able to figure out what happened....

    I still really never understood the point or anything about the story, not to mention all the spy stuff bored me as I found the characters flat & dull... not anyone to like or care about.
  • (2/5)
    Surprisingly tedious. Not her usual interesting plot and characters here.
  • (5/5)
    This is one of my favorite Agatha Christie's. It has intrigue, interesting characters, and no primary investigator.
  • (2/5)
    In There is a Tide, Poirot remarks to Superintendent Spence that it's always the human interest that gets him. I think that is what I like so much about Agatha Christie's books – her incisive and almost brutal analyses of all the people in her books. This is especially well achieved in her books about murders within families. Unfortunately, that's also what this book lacks.Passenger to Frankfurt seems to be Agatha Christie's attempt to write a thriller. I am not sure how many of these non-murder mystery books she's written; this is the first one I've read. It follows a global conspiracy to control the world, reviving Nazism along the way. The protagonist is a British diplomat, who is aided by a beautiful female spy.The book features some traditional Christie trademarks, like the couple falling in love, and some incisive commentary about the players in the conspiracy. However, most of it felt muddled and incomprehensible, and a little dated. I think Christie's brand of sensationalism works really well for small towns, but doesn't translate well to global events. I also didn't really understand how each event led to the next, and there were way too many characters introduced, so I couldn't keep track of who was who. The narrative wasn't cohesive, with viewpoints being switched erratically. I'd stick to Christie's murder mysteries.Originally posted on my blog.