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The Righteous Men

The Righteous Men

Written by Sam Bourne

Narrated by Dennis Boutsikaris


The Righteous Men

Written by Sam Bourne

Narrated by Dennis Boutsikaris

ratings:
3.5/5 (17 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Released:
Sep 1, 2006
ISBN:
9780743565288
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

A series of brutal murders around the globe . . . an ancient prophecy of the end of the world . . . an international bestseller in the blockbuster tradition of The Last Templar

New York Times reporter Will Monroe's investigation of a rash of seemingly random killings takes a dark and dangerous turn when his wife is kidnapped by shadowy enemies who want him to stop. Desperate to save his wife, Will follows the clues into the heart of New York's Hassidic community, and learns that the stakes of his quest are higher then he could ever imagine. As the death toll rises, he enlists an eccentric Kabbalah expert to decode his wife's captors' cryptic messages. The trail they pursue leads inexorably to a set of ancient texts and a prophecy that will save the world . . . or destroy all of life as we know it.

What will happen when the one secret that has kept the world safe for thousands of years is revealed to all? In The Righteous Men, a blistering, high-concept thriller filled with mystery, romance and suspense, Sam Bourne takes listeners deep into the hidden worlds of fundamentalist religion, mysticism and biblical prophecies, in a visionary tale as frightening as it is entertaining.
Released:
Sep 1, 2006
ISBN:
9780743565288
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Sam Bourne is the pseudonym of Jonathan Freedland, an award-winning journalist and broadcaster. He has written a weekly column for the Guardian since 1997, having previously served as the paper’s Washington correspondent, and presents Radio 4’s contemporary history programme, The Long View. His first novel, The Righteous Men, was a Sunday Times No. 1 bestseller. He lives in London with his wife and their two children.

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Reviews

What people think about The Righteous Men

3.5
17 ratings / 17 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    A great story
  • (3/5)
    A descent enough thriller, nothing special, but I'd read more of his works.
  • (1/5)

    The back cover of this book contains a review extract from Esquire claiming that The Righteous Men is even more readable than Dan Brown. This is not exactly the highest of hurdles and, even though Bourne -- in reality UK columnist Jonathan Freedland -- manages to clear it, his trailing foot sets the crossbar aquiver.

    Newbie New York Times journo Will Monroe seeks to impress his bosses, and does so as he unearths the stories behind two seemingly unrelated murders on opposite sides of the country, discovering that both victims, one a pimp and the other a redneck survivalist, had secretly perpetrated acts of extraordinary kindness: they were "righteous men". Promptly Will's wife Beth is abducted. With the help of an old hacker friend and Beth's predecessor, the sexy TC, Will discovers Beth's been taken by a Brooklyn cult of Ultraorthodox Jews. But are they the bad guys? Or are they trying to save the world? -- because there's a tradition that at any one time there are 36 righteous men in the world, and if someone should knock 'em all off it'll be The End. And someone is indeed doing the requisite knocking off . . .

    There's lots of Kabbalistic thrashing around, successions of pointlessly puerile riddles in the Dan Brown vein for Will and TC to solve, plenty of items for Thog's Masterclass, wooden characterization, dire visualization (how do you tell, at a distance and in dim street lighting, that someone has blue eyes?) and much more. In a couple of instances there are silly little continuity errors, as if the printed text was assembled from several different drafts and no one troubled to check the joins. Every now and then there's a nice touch, as when Will, despite his anxiety over Beth, has guilty little flashbacks to some of the things he and TC used to get up to, back in the day; but most of this is pretty drab.
  • (4/5)
    This is an enjoyable fast paced thriller.The main character is Will Monroe a journalist for the New York Times. He investigates the death of a local pimp. He digs deeper to get a good story and accidently uncovers a bizarre Jewish cult and also links between the pimps death and a white racist in Seattle. His Wife Beth is held hostage by the Jewish cult. More bizarre deaths occur Will gets his old girlfriend TC to help as he keeps getting strange clues sent to him via text. Eventually all is revealed there is another cult this time a Christian one Wills Dad is the leader. Will has to kill him to save the life of his unborn child,
  • (4/5)
    I'd have given this 4.5 stars if I'd had the option! A page-turner, with depth, interest, riddles, and unexpected twists. Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    this was kind of an old testament based "the davinci code" but better written. it's a fun and fast read. a murder mystery with a lot of twists and turns. i really enjoyed it. granted, it's not going to win a pullitzer or something crazy like that, but it's an enjoyable book.
  • (3/5)
    This was another new author for me. I didn't like this book much. In fact, I almost gave up on the book several times. However, I did finish it and it did get good in the last 75 pages. I don,t think I will read any other books by this author.
  • (4/5)
    The jews believe that there are 36 righteous men on the Earth at any given time, and it is their presence that prevents God from destroying the world. Someone else believes the same, and they are using that knowledge. Not for good. They want to trigger armageddon. Can they be stopped in time?This is an intriguing and thrilling book about a journalist caught up in momentous events he doesn't understand or believe. Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    This book wasn't too bad. Nice back story, fast enough pace for most of the book though there were a few slow places in the beginning. Based on ancient Jewish tradition mingled with a present day religious cult there were enough clues that I had it mostly figured out, but there was a twist that I hadn't counted on that made the ending quite enjoyable. Enjoyable.
  • (3/5)
    This is an OK thriller along the lines of The Da Vinci Code (yes - another one). The cataclysm in this book is based on an ancient Jewish tradition regarding the Righteous men who support the world. Will Monroe - a journalist on the New York Times, gets caught up in the race toward the end of the world when his wife is kidnapped, and it suddenly falls to him to try and rescue her and ultimately everything. Using his knack of getting into trouble, his tendency to not listen to anyone, and his trusty and tolerant ex-girlfriend, he embarks on a two day roller coaster ride to save the world.I don't think I was quite convinced by it. It was exciting, but put-down-able, and I had figured out the 'twist' long before it happened. I do think this formula is getting to the point where it has run its course.
  • (3/5)
    Another book written on the back of the Da Vinci Code, but not as good in my opinion. There were some glaring 'Duh' moments (mostly from the main character) eg. he spent several hours spent trying to work out what a text message meant before his ex-girlfriend said 'Why don't you try replying to it?' Duh.
  • (4/5)
    Will Monroe has an American Father and English mother. He grew up in England and now is working as a junior journalist in the New York Times. When he is assigned a murder there are questions about the reasoning. When he finds that another murder is somewhat linked, and his wife goes missing, kidnapped, he has a reason to investigate the murders. When he does he finds that the purpose is obscure and the motives of everyone around him has to be suspected. Starts with somewhat of a bang, then starts to lag and then picks up again. Interesting uses of Jewish legend and tradition. It kept me guessing and the twist at the end took me by surprise.
  • (4/5)
    Cub reporter at the New York Times thinks he is reporting on a string of unrelated murders when his wife is kidnapped. During his rescue efforts he realizes that he has stumbled upon a plot to bring about the end of the world by killing the tzadikim, the righteous men of our generation.
  • (4/5)
    The Righteous Men has a good start and a good end. But the center park of the book really takes too many pages to explain the friendships and especially the SMS-riddles. And there is a error as well: if you cannot see the sender of an SMS, you cannot reply. All in all this is a good book when you're on holidays but don't expect too much.
  • (2/5)
    Another cryptology/conspiracy type book. Apparently this is meant to be a threat to Dan Brown, but I can't see him losing any sleep.
  • (4/5)
    At first Will just thinks he's lucked out in finding a good news story to chase. Two murders on opposite sides of the country, intriguing because both involve men who are remembered for unexpectedly making a sacrifice that can only be explained as "righteous". Will doesn't immediately make the connection, but when he is sent a message that his wife has been kidnapped he desperately starts to follow the kidnappers trail. Which leads him to a religious sect, an ancient legend, and more murders. Will he be able to solve the mystery of the "righteous men" in time?
  • (4/5)
    Okay, people. This is NOT a book of literature, nor does it lay a claim to be a book of literature. It is nothing beyond a fun mystery that is good for spending a few hours reading time. That said, here's my review:This book is a fast-paced thriller that kept me turning pages after I started it, and is really good if you're looking for a few hours of reading entertainment time. Don't expect great literature here, because it is simply a suspense thriller, but it tops pretty much everything on the shelves currently. My understanding is that the American version is out in September, so put this one on your list to buy if you are into this genre. I liked it with one caveat. I thought it was a bit predictable, but there is a good twist at the end that I wasn't expecting so that made up for the predictability factor. And it is a bit far-fetched, but what's not out there in the realm of thrillers/suspense? So all in all, I'd say it was a fun reading experience.basic summary, no spoilers:Will Monroe is on the fast track to becoming a rather top- notch journalist for the New York Times, and his first good story was a look at the life of the victim of a rather brutal crime, a pimp who had been stabbed to death. After his story appears in the paper, he is sent to sub for someone in the Seattle bureau, but while there, his nose for news sends him to investigate the death of a right-wing militia man in Montana. It is while he is on this trip that he receives a rather cryptic email saying that his wife has been kidnapped, and he takes the first plane home. His investigations into his wife's kidnapping take Will and his friends far into the world of Jewish mysticism, into a situation where he is not sure who he can trust. As I said earlier, it's a fun read and will be a good way to pass an afternoon or two. I think if you like suspense or thriller type novels, you shouldn't miss this one.