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Killer's Choice

Killer's Choice

Written by Ed McBain

Narrated by Dick Hill


Killer's Choice

Written by Ed McBain

Narrated by Dick Hill

ratings:
3/5 (84 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Released:
Mar 27, 2012
ISBN:
9781455873777
Format:
Audiobook

Description

A woman is murdered in a liquor store, hurtling the men from the 87th Precinct into an investigation of her secret lives and many possible enemies.

"The 87th Precinct [is] one of the great literary accomplishments of the last half-century." -Pete Hamill, Newsday

"McBain forces us to think twice about every character we meet…even those we thought we already knew." -New York Times Book Review

Released:
Mar 27, 2012
ISBN:
9781455873777
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Ed McBain has been the recipient of the Grand Master Award of the Mystery Writers of America. His 87th Precinct novels are international bestsellers. He lives in Connecticut.


Related to Killer's Choice

Titles in the series (40)

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Reviews

What people think about Killer's Choice

3.1
84 ratings / 5 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Another strong entry. I love how fast these books read.
  • (4/5)
    "Killer's Choice" was an early one, the one where we meet Detective Cotton Hawes, who was supposed to take over as the "hero" of the series, since McBain's editor determined that women would not find a married man like Carella an appealing hero. He was an idiot, whoever he was. I like Hawes well enough, but Carella and Meyer are my favorites, and they are both married. Anyway, this one is about a woman named Annie Boone who is murdered, and the detectives have to figure out which one of her was killed in order to find the killer. See, Annie Boone was a different person to everyone who knew her: her ex-husband thought she was brilliant and vivacious and missed her dreadfully; her mother thought she was a dimwit; one boyfriend said she played billiards with the best of them and was really fun; another boyfriend thought she was a very refined lady who enjoyed ballet. In other words, a normal woman.
  • (4/5)
    Carella and Kling team up to track down the killer of a woman that becomes more of a mystery than her death. Carella and Kling make an interesting pair, as Kling's young and almost naive rookie appearance clashes with yet compliments Carella's experience and certainty. This is the first real Rashomon-style story in the 87th series, a theme that McBain will return to again and again to effectively illustrate the difficulty in discovering the truth when it's very definition is more than subjective. Conflicting testimonies and descriptions raise many questions about the true nature of the victim's personality, and many of these mysteries remain unsolved beyond the closing of the case, adding a dizzying perspective to the difficulty the detectives face in sorting relevant facts and clues from personal opinion and self serving dishonesty.This novel also sees the exit of Roger Havilland and the introduction of Cotton Hawes, the latter of which attempts to track down the killer of the former after a shaky start at the 87th casts doubt upon his credibility in the department. Meyer also makes his appearances, but mostly he is relegated to the background.
  • (4/5)
    “… and the moon hung in the sky like a whore’s belly button…”Ahh, nighttime in the city, specifically, it’s 87th precinct! This book welcomes Cotton Hawes to the fold, and bids goodbye to Roger Havilland. And the main case is the murder of Annie Boone, a woman who seems to have had many 'faces'. (Havilland's murder is the secondary story) I enjoyed this fifth offering of the series, and look forward to number six! I also really like the ending:"The car went silent. The men breathed the hot summer air. Slowly, the car threaded its way uptown to the precinct and the squad room."
  • (4/5)
    "Shards of glass covered the floor like broken chords from a bop chorus."Carella and Kling team up to track down the killer of a woman that becomes more of a mystery than her death. Carella and Kling make an interesting pair, as Kling's young and almost naive rookie appearance clashes with yet compliments Carella's experience and certainty. This is the first real Rashomon-style story in the 87th series, a theme that McBain will return to again and again to effectively illustrate the difficulty in discovering the truth when it's very definition is more than subjective. Conflicting testimonies and descriptions raise many questions about the true nature of the victim's personality, and many of these mysteries remain unsolved beyond the closing of the case, adding a dizzying perspective to the difficulty the detectives face in sorting relevant facts and clues from personal opinion and self serving dishonesty.This novel also sees the exit of Roger Haviland and the introduction of Cotton Hawes, the latter of which attempts to track down the killer of the former after a shaky start at the 87th casts doubt upon his credibility in the department. Meyer also makes his appearances, but mostly he is relegated to the background.