Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
Killer's Choice

Killer's Choice

Written by Ed McBain

Narrated by Dick Hill


Killer's Choice

Written by Ed McBain

Narrated by Dick Hill

ratings:
4/5 (6 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Released:
Mar 27, 2012
ISBN:
9781455873777
Format:
Audiobook

Description

A woman is murdered in a liquor store, hurtling the men from the 87th Precinct into an investigation of her secret lives and many possible enemies.

"The 87th Precinct [is] one of the great literary accomplishments of the last half-century." -Pete Hamill, Newsday

"McBain forces us to think twice about every character we meet…even those we thought we already knew." -New York Times Book Review

Released:
Mar 27, 2012
ISBN:
9781455873777
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Ed McBain, a recipient of the Mystery Writers of America's coveted Grand Master Award, was also the first American to receive the Diamond Dagger, the British Crime Writers Association's highest award. His books have sold more than one hundred million copies, ranging from the more than fifty titles in the 87th Precinct series (including the Edgar Award–nominated Money, Money, Money) to the bestselling novels written under his own name, Evan Hunter—including The Blackboard Jungle (now in a fiftieth anniversary edition from Pocket Books) and Criminal Conversation. Fiddlers, his final 87th Precinct novel, was recently published in hardcover. Writing as both Ed McBain and Evan Hunter, he broke new ground with Candyland, a novel in two parts. He also wrote the screenplay for Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds. He died in 2005. Visit EdMcBain.com.

Related to Killer's Choice

Titles In This Series (41)
Related Audiobooks

Reviews

What people think about Killer's Choice

3.8
6 ratings / 5 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Another strong entry. I love how fast these books read.
  • (4/5)
    "Killer's Choice" was an early one, the one where we meet Detective Cotton Hawes, who was supposed to take over as the "hero" of the series, since McBain's editor determined that women would not find a married man like Carella an appealing hero. He was an idiot, whoever he was. I like Hawes well enough, but Carella and Meyer are my favorites, and they are both married. Anyway, this one is about a woman named Annie Boone who is murdered, and the detectives have to figure out which one of her was killed in order to find the killer. See, Annie Boone was a different person to everyone who knew her: her ex-husband thought she was brilliant and vivacious and missed her dreadfully; her mother thought she was a dimwit; one boyfriend said she played billiards with the best of them and was really fun; another boyfriend thought she was a very refined lady who enjoyed ballet. In other words, a normal woman.
  • (3/5)
    As said elsewhere, yes: short 'n' snappy. Does the job. It's effective, efficient, even entertaining. One can imagine the author as extremely good company: the writing comes easily, the story rattles along, he clearly writes as he speaks - fluently and amusingly ... but perhaps not very profoundly. And this is now a period piece, without quite yet achieving 'historical novel' status. The milieu of late-fifties NYC seems dated, and its inhabitants with it. There are universals in police procedural, for sure, but there is little here to excite a new reader. The plot, too, while clever(-ish), is, shall we say, formulaic, to the point of predictable.Perhaps I shouldn't have started here?
  • (4/5)
    Carella and Kling team up to track down the killer of a woman that becomes more of a mystery than her death. Carella and Kling make an interesting pair, as Kling's young and almost naive rookie appearance clashes with yet compliments Carella's experience and certainty. This is the first real Rashomon-style story in the 87th series, a theme that McBain will return to again and again to effectively illustrate the difficulty in discovering the truth when it's very definition is more than subjective. Conflicting testimonies and descriptions raise many questions about the true nature of the victim's personality, and many of these mysteries remain unsolved beyond the closing of the case, adding a dizzying perspective to the difficulty the detectives face in sorting relevant facts and clues from personal opinion and self serving dishonesty.This novel also sees the exit of Roger Havilland and the introduction of Cotton Hawes, the latter of which attempts to track down the killer of the former after a shaky start at the 87th casts doubt upon his credibility in the department. Meyer also makes his appearances, but mostly he is relegated to the background.
  • (4/5)
    "Shards of glass covered the floor like broken chords from a bop chorus."Carella and Kling team up to track down the killer of a woman that becomes more of a mystery than her death. Carella and Kling make an interesting pair, as Kling's young and almost naive rookie appearance clashes with yet compliments Carella's experience and certainty. This is the first real Rashomon-style story in the 87th series, a theme that McBain will return to again and again to effectively illustrate the difficulty in discovering the truth when it's very definition is more than subjective. Conflicting testimonies and descriptions raise many questions about the true nature of the victim's personality, and many of these mysteries remain unsolved beyond the closing of the case, adding a dizzying perspective to the difficulty the detectives face in sorting relevant facts and clues from personal opinion and self serving dishonesty.This novel also sees the exit of Roger Haviland and the introduction of Cotton Hawes, the latter of which attempts to track down the killer of the former after a shaky start at the 87th casts doubt upon his credibility in the department. Meyer also makes his appearances, but mostly he is relegated to the background.