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From Time to Time: The Sequel To Time And Again

From Time to Time: The Sequel To Time And Again

Written by Jack Finney

Narrated by Campbell Scott


From Time to Time: The Sequel To Time And Again

Written by Jack Finney

Narrated by Campbell Scott

ratings:
3/5 (8 ratings)
Length:
4 hours
Released:
Mar 1, 1995
ISBN:
9780743547420
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

The long-awaited sequel to Time And Again

Si Morley is back and the world may never be the same.


When Time and Again was published in 1970, it immediately developed a loyal following that has grown with each passing year. Now, twenty-five years later, Jack Finney returns to the same magical territory and finds Ruben Prien still at work with the Project, still dreaming of altering man's fate by going back in time to adjust events...to interfere, some might say, with destiny.

Once again, the conduit to that bygone era is Simon Morley, the man who actually proved himself capable of traveling back and forth in time. This time, he does so with a grand purpose: an attempt to prevent World War I.

A tale that is both thrilling and nostalgic, magical and terrifying, ultimately charming and full of suspense, From Time To Time is the sequel a generation has been waiting for.
Released:
Mar 1, 1995
ISBN:
9780743547420
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Jack Finney (1911–1995) was the author of the much-loved and critically acclaimed novel Time and Again, as well as its sequel, From Time to Time. Best known for his thrillers and science fiction, a number of his books—including Invasion of the Body Snatchers—have been made into movies.



Reviews

What people think about From Time to Time

2.8
8 ratings / 13 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (2/5)
    I had hoped it would be better than 'Time and Again', but it was worse.
  • (3/5)
    I did not like this nearly as well as Time and Again. In fact, I almost put the book down for good about halfway through when Si was talking things through with Rube because I was so bored with it. The book did get more interesting once Si traveled back to the early 1900's, but there were still sections that I skimmed over because they just weren't that interesting. If I didn't like Time and Again so well, I think I would have given up on this one much earlier. I did not like the way that things were done in the beginning of this book to change the ending of the previous book. I did like the way that certain things happend with Helen (the Jotta Girl) with her scarf on the Titanic near the end of the book.
  • (2/5)
    Although I haven't read the predecessor, I had high hopes for this time travel novel. Well, those hopes were tough to fulfill; this book was a small disappointment. DO NOT READ THIS BOOK FOR THE PLOT!! This novel is for time travel geeks only (like me)! Finney can paint a humanly realistic mural of a historic setting in a unique first person narrative, and that's where this book shines. But it lacks a reasonable plot. Many of the character decisions are rash, half-hearted attempts to do something, usually accompanied with some driving force, either a desperate ploy to avoid futility or an obsessive zeal for some trivial detail. The main character seems to tell himself on every page, "I have no idea what I'm supposed to do here, so I'll just play along until something happens." Like a session of any 'adventure' computer game (Myst and Starship Titanic come to mind), the hero stumbles around haphazardly, lost in a puzzle as big as the world, until he succeeds out of serendipity rather than clever resourcefulness. Despite the plot's shortcomings, I did enjoy the playfulness with which Finney approaches history. He treats it as a thing of wonder, like the awe a child feels upon visiting Disneyland. He truly loves the past, loves thinking about the past, and loves using words to turn a time period in his hands like a whimsical toy. If it is possible to feel nostalgic about an era 70 years before I was born, this book has accomplished that. [Pasted from my blog from the original 8 June 2006 post]
  • (4/5)
    While entertaining, this sequel to "Time and Again" does not capture the excitement of the original. I feel this has nothing to do with the reader being in on the devices used to negotiate time travel, but Finney fails to capture the time period as well as he did in the original.The opening scenes are very well done. We come in on a therapy session, of sorts, for people who remember history a little differently than what is generally accepted: JFK's second term in office, seeing the majesty of the Titanic as she docks in New York and other historic anomalies. Wonderful characterization, great believable dialog.Somehow, the writing falls flat and all the edges are lost when the main characters travel back in time to try and change history. I think this is the source of the shortcomings of the novel, it concentrates on trying to change history, rather than chronicle the life the characters are immersed in. That was the attraction of "Time and Again", the intimate look into another time period.Still, Finney's skill is above average in this tale. It is too bad that the sequel was not as good as the original. Suggested if you like stories that play with the stream of time.
  • (1/5)
    If you like his other books, AVOID this one. If you've never read him, read his other books.
  • (3/5)
    I had heard that this book was not nearly as good as it's predecessor, Time and Again. Since I didn't think Time and Again was so great, I wasn't even sure there was a point to reading this one. But I was curious, so I did. And in some ways, I actually thought this book was better than the first one, or at least it had more potential.This book begins with a group of people gathering to compare evidence of what I'll call "echoes" from alternate timestreams. I thought this was a very interesting way to begin: those who had read Time and Again would, of course, suspect that the echoes were caused by Si Morley's presence in the 19th century, but group didn't seem to have any idea what was causing the echoes. If Finney had chosen to continue with the thread of this question, this could have been a really interesting book.Unfortunately, this line of thinking is never really developed. Instead, Finney gives us something that is really just an echo of the first book. First Finney essentially changes the ending of Time and Again, so that the Project exists, and then sends Si back to the present because he wants to find out what's going on with his old friends. He finds Rube, who has evidence of a timestream where WWI never happened (this is the only furtherance we see of the plotline from the beginning) and Si agrees to go back to 1912 to see if he can prevent the Great War.In some ways it was more interesting to follow Si on his first time travel adventure, when all he was really trying to do was observe, rather than change things. Ultimately, however, Si's efforts to change things don't amount to much, so all he really does is observe things in a different time, making this largely the same story that Finney told already, but with more unfulfilled potential.