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The Abortionist's Daughter: a novel

The Abortionist's Daughter: a novel

Written by Elisabeth Hyde

Narrated by Beth McDonald


The Abortionist's Daughter: a novel

Written by Elisabeth Hyde

Narrated by Beth McDonald

ratings:
3/5 (26 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Released:
Jun 12, 2006
ISBN:
9781598872675
Format:
Audiobook

Description

When the director of the Center for Reproductive Choice is murdered, a town must confront the consequences of choice, the nature of guilt, and the hidden allegiances and hostilities that animate and destroy families and communities.

Two weeks before Christmas, Dr. Diana Duprey is found floating face-up in a small lap pool in her back yard. A medical doctor with an abortion practice, and a national figure who inspired passion and ignited tempers, she had been the target of violent threats by right-to-life activists. Her husband, Frank Thomson, a lawyer in the district attorney's office, fought bitterly with her on the morning of her murder. To reveal the nature of their argument would cost him his career—and more. Diana's daughter, Megan, also quarreled with her on the day of her death. The Reverend Stephen O'Connell, founder of the town's outspoken Lifeblood Coalition, had reasons of his own to want Diana's practice shut down, including her involvement with his troubled teenager. The investigation of the case unleashes a flood of secrets in Duprey's small Colorado town, whose residents must face haunting questions—and the accusations of their own consciences.

Released:
Jun 12, 2006
ISBN:
9781598872675
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Born and raised in New Hampshire, Elisabeth Hyde briefly practiced law for the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. In 1982 she took time off to write her first novel, Her Native Colors, and never looked back. She has been awarded working scholarships to the Bread Loaf Writers Conference and teaches creative writing through artist-in-residence programs. Her fourth novel, The Abortionist's Daughter, was selected for the Richard & Judy Summer Read and became a UK bestseller. Pan are publishing Crazy as Chocolate in Spring 2007. Elisabeth lives in Boulder, Colorado with her husband and three children.


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What people think about The Abortionist's Daughter

3.1
26 ratings / 28 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (2/5)
    It was a bit...fluffy. The writing was nothing special, there were no great insights, no real imagery, & despite the perhaps controversial title there was no real gritty discussion. It was just a simple who-dunnit, a quick read, enough to entertain but nothing more. And for the record, I knew who-dunnit from about the first chapter.
  • (3/5)
    Reasonably OK mystery.
  • (2/5)
    Ok not brilliant
  • (4/5)
    Quick read. Entirely predictable.
  • (2/5)
    Fairly early on I went - this character is going to be the killer. I didn't buy Hank and Megan's relationship. I didn't get what he saw in her. He is 7 years older than him. He is a grown man with a career and a house. She comes across as a scared confused little girl. She is legally an adult - barely, but she is still a kid. Why is he so fascinated by her? He sees her and what she is so beautiful he can't get her our of his head? He is acting like an idiot.When Diana talks about by preforming the abortion she is just pushing the reset button it made me think of the anti drinking and driving commercial that say life doesn't have a rewind button.
  • (3/5)
    Really didn't live up to the hype!
  • (4/5)
    This was a random book that I picked up at the Lifeline bookfair. It has an interesting enough story line to make it a fairly easy to read novel. It does keep you guessing until nearly the end as to "whodonit". Interesting book. Worth a read.
  • (3/5)
    A decent read but didn't live up to expectations. Great potential: abortion doctor murdered. Hot button issues: abortion, infidelity, martial problems, pornography, recreational drug use, obsession, special needs children, mother-daughter relationships. Likely murder suspects: discontented husband, rebellious daughter, jilted lovers, drug dealers, right-to-life activists. Ultimately, the reason for the murder was senseless and completely unrelated to the victim's chosen profession. Why did the author bother to make the doctor an abortionist? Was the provocative title a marketing ploy to catch our attention? Annoying. More annoying - an autopsy report stating that semen was found in the doctor's vagina but we never find out whose it was. Where was the editor?
  • (4/5)
    Just what I needed for a light read: read quickly but able to put it down. Full of entanglements and people's erroneous assumptions about others. Very melodramatic teens, I started thinking they should just grow up. The use of drugs (ecstasy by the teens, pot by the mother) was presented matter of factly, not as something horribly illicit, which bothered me. I suppose other people could be just as bothered by the fact of providing abortions, but that is definitely treated as controversial in this story. I'd probably read another by this author, but I'm not looking for this to be a series.
  • (4/5)
    VERY suspenseful and good till the end. Very much like The Doctor's Wife!
  • (2/5)
    Meh. This is an OK book for killing time while traveling. But I think anyone that was, say, an English major once upon a time or cares about language will find it hard to ignore the poor character development, erratic pacing and unbelievable police work.The author--a wife and mother--doesn't know how to establish the relationship between mother and daughter. Were there some other kids? I forget already. Worse, she doesn't describe well at all the critical relationship between the girl and her high school boyfriend--how and why the girl is attracted to the guy. It's *summarized.* The girl is the daughter of a gynecologist/obstetrician/abortionist yet when she begins to have sex, frequently at that, neither party gives a thought to contraception. Forget the mother's role here. The book takes place in the present age, the girl is supposed to be popular, the high school doesn't appear to be in the Bible Belt: Elisabeth Hyde, you don't think girls and their male peers aren't talking about sex, condoms and other contraceptives all the time? Now perhaps the girl is acting out her resentment of her mother or something ... but nowhere is this hinted at. As I say, this crucial relationship between the girl and boy is just summarized.Yet Hyde goes into quite a few details about the life of the youngish cop on the case, supplying bits of business about his relationship with his girlfriend. Maybe she has a series in mind--in which case, he should be even more front and center. Instead, it's mostly from the POV of the husband/father character.And, oh yeah, how about the ridiculous bit when nude pix of the girl are found on a porn site *and the cops decide not to tel her*? Ah, yes, it's so easy to keep these things secret. Moreover, all you (or the police or a lawyer such as the father) would have to do is threaten the website or the host with holy hell and/or damages to get the photos taken down immediately. Her age is beside the point: they need the subject's permission. They would need the subject's permission even if she wasn't nude. And the author is a lawyer?! I guess we're lucky she dropped out of that profession.
  • (3/5)
    This was an odd one - not a bad read, with some interesting points raised around the subject of abortion, and some elements that surprised me too, particularly the way in which the victim's family were pretty much left to fend for themselves when they weren't allowed back into the house as it was a crime scene. Does it really happen this way? I wouldn't know but was a bit surprised all the same. On the face of it this is a standard whoddunit, but structured differently from the norm. The author sets up a scenario when any one of three or four people could have 'dunnit', but in the end it was a toss-up which one it was. The police's role seemed not so much to solve the crime (did they do any detecting?) as to get in the way.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book quite a bit. Family relationships are so complicated and this book portrayed that very accurately. Every character in this book is complex. The story wasn't surpriing. I don't know how they didn't figure out who killed Diane from the beginning. Unless, you chalk it up to the fact that in real life the police wouldn't have figured it out that quickly either. Not a heavy book, but it has it's moments.
  • (2/5)
    So so so predictable. I knew who the killer was from the start. The characters were not very believable because they all did things that didn't seem true to their nature. **SPOILER** What police detective falls in love after seeing nude pics on the internet of a 19-year-old relative of a victim in the case he's working? And what detective would risk his career and relationship with a woman he loves to sleep with that teen? But he's still portrayed as the best and brightest on the force and it doesn't work. For many reasons in addition to the "romance," it doesn't read like Hyde consulted any law enforcement agencies for info on protocol and procedures.I'm not sure why the book is called The Abortionist's Daughter. The author never decides whether the book is a story about Megan's bad relationship and sexual choices or the murder of her mother. The fact that Megan's mother is an abortion provider, as Megan calls her, is pretty incidental to the story.
  • (3/5)
    It's pretty good, but definitely not great. I saw the end coming almost since the beginning, which kinda sucks. But, I did finish it, which says something.
  • (1/5)
    I've had this book sitting on the shelf for awhile. One of my friends off-loaded it during a visit because she didn't have room in her luggage. In hindsight, that really should have been a sign. I usually love mysteries, any mysteries, but this one was a complete snooze fest, extremely predictable, and for whatever reason, the author decided to weave in a completely bizarre romance angle that did not work for me at all. This one is headed straight for my sell pile.
  • (3/5)
    This is a light crime novel. The fact that that an abortionist is involved is almost incidental and not central to the plot. But if light crime novels are your thing then I guess this is a good'un.
  • (3/5)
    was slightly disapointed by this, as i expected much more of an insight to the issues surrounding abortion, the title is misleading, the story isnt about megan:the abortionists daughter. it is about a crime.was a frustrateing read when i had intended on a more phylosophical story, hardly touched on the controversial issue of abortion.however, as a light read, not dissapointing.
  • (3/5)
    The Abortionist's Daughter - Elisabeth HydeDespite the title, I found this book to be a light read. Rather than delve into the arguments and issues surrounding the Right to Life/Abortion debate, Elisabeth Hyde presents the reader with a murder at the beginning of the novel. The victim's relationships and the lives of her family are revealed --and, of course, the mystery solved. This book is a well-written page-turner, not a fierce intellectual discussion.
  • (5/5)
    I really liked the book but the title isn't great. I suspect since the success of the book "The Timetraveller's wife" publishers just hope to make a book successful by using the "the 's " titles. It's not only about the daughter. It deals with a family falling apart because of the violent death of one member. In this aspect it reminded me of "Songs for the Missing" by Stewart O'Nan I read earlier this year. I particularly liked the story being told from three different viewpoints - daughter, father and detective and how it dealt with the topic of abortion throughout the book.
  • (4/5)
    A Great read! I know the title turns off people, esp mothers but despite that it really was a good book. Highly recommend it.
  • (3/5)
    Two weeks before Christmas, Diana Duprey, an outspoken abortion doctor, is found floating in her pool, a bruise the size of a golf ball visible through her dark curls. A national figure, Diana inspired passion and ignited tempers, never more so than on the day of her death." "Her husband, Frank, an attorney in the D.A.'s office for more than twenty years, had fought bitterly with her on the day of her murder. Yet to reveal the nature of their fight would cost him not only his career but something greater still - a relationship he will go to any lengths to protect. Diana's daughter, Megan, a college freshman, had also quarreled with Diana that day, and her role in her mother's murder will prove more significant than she ever could have anticipated. The Reverend Stephen O'Connell, founder of the town's pro-life coalition, obviously had issues with Diana, but his anger extended beyond the political to the personal - namely, Dr. Duprey's involvement with his own troubled teenager. Meanwhile, the detective on the case grapples to make sense of it all. His investigation implicates many in this town and reveals a series of gross miscalculations, each one challenging what we know, or think we know, about community, fidelity, justice, and love.
  • (4/5)
    Kind of a mystery novel, about who killed the abortionist, but it was quite well-written with good characterization.
  • (2/5)
    It kept me intrigues throughout, but at the same time, sometimes felt like there wasn't much going on during it. It felt, at the end, like the set up was the person "whodunit" said that s/he did, the next chapter was a set up of the doctor's last day, and then a chapter about how life was going along with everyone afterward. Quick read, though.
  • (5/5)
    Dr. Diana Duprey—abortion clinic director, wife of local Colorado DA Frank Thompson and mother of 19-year-old college freshman Megan—has plenty of enemies, so when her body is found floating in the exercise pool of her garden tour–featured house, the list of suspects is long. Aside from abortion opponents and distraught parents, there were the arguments overheard between Frank and Diana, and Megan and Diana shortly before. The coroner, a woman with whom Frank had had an affair, won't do the autopsy, and a man harboring a grudge against Frank takes her place. Meanwhile, Megan finds herself attracted to Huck Berlin, the policeman assigned to the case, and Huck finds Megan in various compromising positions. Former U.S. attorney Hyde (Crazy as Chocolate) describes Megan's contradictory, confused emotions without oversimplification ("Have fun killing babies" were Megan's inadvertent last words to her mother). Hyde also jumps back in time, delving into Diana's work at the clinic and her feelings about it, as well as the lives and feelings of her clients. Rather than generating suspense, the murder provides a frame for the turbulence in and around a woman propelled by idealism and strongly held beliefs. Look for this book to get play as South Dakota's challenge to Roe v. Wade wends through the courts
  • (2/5)
    I quite enjoyed this - typical holiday reading though. Thought that it was very predictable.
  • (2/5)
    A terribly predictable and contrived plot. This certainly isn't the greatest book in the world. But it served me well for a quick weekend read. Don't start reading this with any great expectations. You'll be disappointed.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. I started this book after previously starting three or four books that were just awful and that I didn't finish. This one was great. I thought it was very well written. The plot revolves around the murder of an abortion doctor, Diana Duprey, but it is about more than that. Hyde is great at writing about the interworkings of a familial relationship. I loved this whole book from start to finish.