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Ship of Magic

Ship of Magic

Written by Robin Hobb

Narrated by Anne Flosnik


Ship of Magic

Written by Robin Hobb

Narrated by Anne Flosnik

ratings:
4.5/5 (121 ratings)
Length:
35 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 22, 2010
ISBN:
9781400184378
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Bingtown is a hub of exotic trade and home to a merchant nobility famed for its liveships-rare vessels carved from wizardwood, which ripens magically into sentient awareness. The fortunes of one of Bingtown's oldest families rest on the newly awakened liveship Vivacia.



For Althea Vestrit, the ship is her rightful legacy unjustly denied her-a legacy she will risk anything to reclaim. For Althea's young nephew Wintrow, wrenched from his religious studies and forced to serve aboard ship, Vivacia is a life sentence.



But the fate of the Vestrit family-and the ship-may ultimately lie in the hands of an outsider. The ruthless pirate Kennit seeks a way to seize power over all the denizens of the Pirate Isles...and the first step of his plan requires him to capture his own liveship and bend it to his will.
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 22, 2010
ISBN:
9781400184378
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Robin Hobb is one of the world’s finest writers of epic fiction. She was born in California in 1952 but raised in Alaska. She raised her family, ran a smallholding, delivered post to her remote community, all at the same time as writing stories and novels. She succeeded on all fronts, raising four children and becoming an internationally best-selling writer. She lives in Tacoma, Washington State.



Reviews

What people think about Ship of Magic

4.4
121 ratings / 36 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Robin Hobb is one of my favourite authors and the Liveship Trader series was the one that got me completely hooked. Seas, adventures and magic all rolled into one. Robin Hobb books are brilliant in that they are great stories and adventures but you also get to love and know the characters and want to know what happens to them. There are loads of connections throughout the books.

  • (4/5)
    The second start of the The Realm of the Elderlings series has very little to do with the first trilogy. The story focuses on a different area of the world on the sea and a port-town with magical ships called Liveships. The Ship of Magic starts off the series really well. Robin Hobb does a great job of creating characters that are unique and interesting, but also grow and change throughout the book. The plot is good with a lot of developments and worldbuilding introduced that I'm sure the following book will expand on. It is a well written book filled with characters you will care about.
  • (2/5)
    Finally sat down and slogged my way through the ending of this book. Great concept, detailed world but the book just couldn't hold my interest. Don't think I'll read the next ones.
  • (5/5)
    [Spoiler Free-From Goodreads]I'm honestly surprised I like this book as much as I do. Robin Hobb definitely pulled off something that could crash down horribly if you're not careful. In that case, it's the fact that two of our main characters don't meet until the very end - and it was something I was expecting to happen way sooner in the book - something I think most authors would have decided to do. But honestly, it just worked out so wonderfully. But let's really get into this review:World: 4.5/5 starsThis of course takes place in the same world as the Farseer books, however we are taken down south and don't hear much about the Six Duchies. I absolutely love everything about the world so far. It's just so interesting and awesome. I'm just scooped right into it, and I can see how this world is a living and thriving one, and I just can't wait to see more of it.Not to mention Hobb seems to have quite the mind. I was impressed with the magic system in Farseer, but talking ships? Didn't expect that!Characters: 4.5/5 starsFor the most part, I have positive things to say about most of them - whether they be heroes or villains. The character development that started is great, and I'm excited to see more - even in some characters I hate, I want to see grow to be better people. But I do think some characters needed some work - including Althea, who was one of my favourite characters. Some characters I couldn't care for at all. I don't understand them in the least.ALSO the ships. They are characters, and I love them!!! Such an interesting thing to do!Plot: 4/5 starsReally loved the plot, but some parts obviously just didn't quite get me. Other parts/scenes I mean... meh. Or just wish they didn't need to be there. Definitely lots of exciting action, though. Complex family stuff that honestly was enjoyable.->Romance: There was ''meh, whatever'' and then there was ''WHY''. So yeah, not really any positives here. Writing: 4.5/5 starsI really love how Robin Hobb writes. But when you consider stuff about some characters and plot and what-not, I can see a little more room for improvement. But overall, loooove it.
  • (2/5)
    I wanted to like this book. I had people recommend Robin Hobb to me as a great writer before. So I tried once, failed. This, my second attempt, determines if I keep going. I wondered as I listened to the audio if the good of Robin Hobb writing is in the actual reading. The audio sufffers from being unable to adequately show the POV shifts when they happen. Not enough of a noticeable gap.The early story suffers from so much backstory and information dump, it hides the actual plot from progressing. I'm sure much of the detail offered is relevant in some way, but the presentation leaves much to be desired.Then I reached the scene that made me want to chuck the MP3 player across the room. I can take only so much, but an overbearing, abusive, controlling, self absorbed bastard like Kyle Haven is portrayed in this book, I can't take it. It links to too many bad memories, which means it isn't a good book to me. Through all of this, it didn't help that the way the narrator chosen by Tantor to read this book annoyed me. The way she drew out the final syllable of words, sounding like she was running out of breath. Ugh. Just not good form for me. So for me, done with this author.
  • (5/5)
    Ship of Magic is the first book in the Liveship Traders trilogy. It is set in the same world as the Farseer trilogy, although the setting and characters are almost completely different.This is the series that made me a huge fan of Robin Hobb. Although I liked the Farseer trilogy, the ending left me a bit confused and I really wanted to see the world sketched out a bit more. Hobb certainly does that and a lot more.The story begins in the port city of Bingtown, a heavily taxed but otherwise neglected exclave of the nation of Jamallia. Bingtown Trader families are famous for their liveships - vessels carved from a special type of wood that ripens into sentience after three people in the family die aboard. Althea Vestrit has been waiting all her life for their ship Vivacia to quicken - even with the sadness of her father's death accompanying it. She has grown up on board the ship and fully expects to inherit it, but when it actually happens, she's in for a nasty shock - the ship instead goes to her greedy brother-in-law Kyle. Althea's gentle cousin Wintrow is training to be a priest and greatly enjoying it, but his father Kyle is determined to make a sailor out of him - by force if necessary. The newly awakened and confused Vivacia needs someone with Vestrit blood aboard her, but all she has is Wintrow, imprisoned upon her against his will. And there's Kennit who is not satisfied with being the most successful pirate of his time, and his plans will lead him directly into Vivacia's path.Hobb is never unduly kind to her characters - she makes them work really hard and go through a lot (it's almost physically painful to read about sometimes, but at least it pays off in the end, unlike say, with Joe Abercrombie.) They are not Chosen Ones - they are just fairly ordinary people that only become heroes because they care about something very much, and will cross any obstacles for it. Althea is no exception - she's stubborn, spirited and impertinent. I found myself alternating between cheering for her and being exasperated at her obstinate sense of entitlement. She loves Vivacia and after a few days of utter despair, makes up her mind that she will do anything to get her back - including proving her seamanship by enlisting on a dangerous whaling ship. Wintrow is also very well written, especially his relationship to Vivacia. He resents her because her need for Vestrit blood has chained him to her, but he also recognises that she's sad and confused and needs his help.Another thing I love about Hobb's fantasy is that there are no straight up villains. Everyone is complex and changeable, and Kennit is no exception. He's got some backstory behind his desire to capture a liveship, and he prides himself on being just and practical, and he's even kind most of the time. He also manipulates people for his own ends, but Hobb never portrays it as evil - he's just the product of his circumstances. The supporting cast is also really well envisioned - especially other Vestrit women (Ronica, Keffria and Malta.)The plot is really just a function of the characters' natural actions - although there is the lingering issue of the sea serpents. Hobb's descriptive writing and the complex history of Bingtown and the Rain Wilds really brings the setting to life.Highly recommended, even if you've never read anything else by Hobb.