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Pines

Pines

Written by Blake Crouch

Narrated by Paul Michael Garcia


Pines

Written by Blake Crouch

Narrated by Paul Michael Garcia

ratings:
4/5 (246 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Released:
Aug 21, 2012
ISBN:
9781469216157
Format:
Audiobook

Description

The one-million copy bestseller that inspired the Fox TV show.

Secret service agent Ethan Burke arrives in Wayward Pines, Idaho, with a clear mission: locate and recover two federal agents who went missing in the bucolic town one month earlier. But within minutes of his arrival, Ethan is involved in a violent accident. He comes to in a hospital, with no ID, no cell phone, and no briefcase. The medical staff seems friendly enough, but something feels…off. As the days pass, Ethan's investigation into the disappearance of his colleagues turns up more questions than answers. Why can't he get any phone calls through to his wife and son in the outside world? Why doesn't anyone believe he is who he says he is? And what is the purpose of the electrified fences surrounding the town? Are they meant to keep the residents in? Or something else out? Each step closer to the truth takes Ethan further from the world he thought he knew, from the man he thought he was, until he must face a horrifying fact-he may never get out of Wayward Pines alive.

2013 International Thriller Award Nominee

Released:
Aug 21, 2012
ISBN:
9781469216157
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Blake Crouch is a bestselling novelist and screenwriter. His novels include the New York Times bestseller Dark Matter, and the international bestselling Wayward Pines trilogy, which was adapted into a television series for FOX. Crouch also co-created the TNT show Good Behavior, based on his Letty Dobesh novellas. He lives in Colorado.


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Reviews

What people think about Pines

4.2
246 ratings / 62 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Pines by Blake Crouch by Paul Michael Garcia is an audible book that kept me guessing to the very end! What a wild ride! So many mysteries! Nothing makes sense! So much intriguing clues but the puzzle is beyond my brain to figure out before it was revealed! Excellent!!! One of my favorite books so far this year! The narration was terrific also!! All around fantastic! I can see why it was a major TV series event on Fox!
  • (2/5)
    Absolutely by the numbers. Read line an outline of Lost or Twin Peaks. Most entertaining part of the book is the afterword that states any attempt at recreating Twin Peaks is doomed to failure and now his book is a show that's an attempt to recreate Twin Peaks.
  • (4/5)
    Holy hell what a story. Special Agent Ethan Burke wakes up with no clue what is going on. Briefly remembering a car accident he realizes he's in the small town of Wayward Pines. He quickly discovers not everything is as it seems. An intense thriller that will keep you wondering WTH right up until the end. I listened to the audiobook version of this and the narrator did a great job.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoy books that start off seemingly normal but the further you get in the more questions are raised until you reach the point where you can't work out what's going on with the scenario that the novel is portraying. That is, in a good way, not the way that a novel is so poorly written it struggles to convey its meaning.This story, much like the show Lost where it starts off with a simple plane crash, yet as the story unfolds things get less clear. Only here it's a secret service agent waking up with no memory of how he got to be laying bruised in a park in the middle of the day. Slowly he becomes aware that he came to the town to investigate two missing agents and was in a car accident, yet he's missing his gun, ID and paperwork and no one in the town seems to be particularly helpful in finding his personal effects. The more questions he asks the more people become standoffish. It's not until the closing of the book that what is going on finally becomes apparent, and I have to say it was unexpected, of the many ideas I had thought of this was not one of them.Although it is a quick read, it's very much worthwhile and enjoyable. I'm looking forward to see where the story goes in the following books as this was brilliant.
  • (3/5)
    A fast-paced but deeply medium novel in the vein of Twin Peaks (explicitly, according to the author). The combination of folk horror and survival horror didn't work for me, but I can see why it's popular.
  • (2/5)
    Ehh I wanted to read Pines because I watched the tv mini-series Wayward Pines. I guess some of the tension I would of felt reading this was lost since I knew what was going on.
    Ethan, a secret service agent is going to Wayward Pines to look for two missing agents that were last seen there. On his way to Wayward Pines he gets into an accident, he cannot locate is wallet, he can't get through to his family or work on any of the phones, he can't seem to leave Wayward Pines and people are acting strange.
    The writing was okay, the fragments were getting to me. Way too many. The book is a quick page turner read and kept me into the story. It's also a little different from the TV series, which is good, but I just felt like I didn't care at all about the characters or what happened to them or how they felt because they were so lacking.
  • (4/5)
    This book was AWESOME! It the revelation at the end was totally unexpected...I LOVE THAT!!! I look forward to finding the time to read the rest of the series.
  • (5/5)
    Wow, that was quite a twist, and I definitely didn't see that coming!
  • (4/5)
    A real page turner. The story caught me in the first chapter and I couldn't put it down. Don't get hug up on the science and just enjoy the story.
  • (4/5)
    Ethan Burke is an FBI agent who awakens in a field after being in a car accident. The town he wanders into to find help is a strange town reminiscent of the 1950's. Although polite, the residents don't answer his questions and the perfect little town begins to seem a little too perfect. With no way to call home or connect to the outside world, Ethan becomes determined to understand what is going on in Wayward Pines to find his way back home.This is a creepy and fast read and I couldn't put it down. It launched me into the other two books of the series that I had to read immediately after this one. So don't start this one unless you have time to read all three. You've been warned!
  • (4/5)
    What do you get when you mix Jurassic Park, LOST, Twin Peaks and Planet of the Apes? Why, you've got Pines! An extremely fun and often times terrifying read by Blake Crouch. Ethan Burke is on assignment for the Secret Service. His mission: to find two missing agents, last known whereabouts: Wayward Pines, Idaho. Before he has a chance to launch his investigation his car is t-boned by a semi. When he opens his eyes he is in a forest and a bit disoriented. His wallet, credit cards and cell phone are gone so he must walk towards the picturesque town center to call the office and his wife and check into a hotel. Not so easy when you have no ID or money. Not so easy when the town folk don't take too kindly to strangers. In his efforts to find a way home he discovers he first needs to find a way out but until he finds that he learns some odd things about this town and the reader finds they're just as disoriented as Ethan. In true Crouch fashion, the reader is transported to the unknown and it's a frightening place. Fasten your seat belts and take a drive to Wayward Pines soon, you may be stuck there for awhile.
  • (3/5)
    The author states in afterward he was inspired to write Pines by viewing the original TV series Twin Peaks. I felt like I was reading an extended version of a Twilight Zome episode. The writing felt very matter of fact. Some character exposition, but we're moving this forward. Though there was physical action, I was more aware of his mental confusions.
  • (4/5)
    PINES is definitely a nailbiter, and you'll enjoy it. But as the first of a trilogy, it will not only make you look forward to reading the next two books; it will make you feel incomplete until you do.After a secret service agent is in a car accident and regains consciousness in a small town, he can only think of returning to his wife and son in Seattle. But, for some reason, no one in the town wants him to leave, and when he tries to escape, he finds there is no way out. The limited-time TV series, "Wayward Pines," was based on this trilogy. Maybe, if you haven't already seen the TV series, you'll enjoy the books more. I base that on my own preference for reading the book before I see the TV show or movie. Or you may feel differently: if you see the TV show first, you'll know the end of this book isn't really the end.
  • (3/5)
    Reading this book after discover the television series, I found it to be slow. It is not a bad read, but in an action/thriller, it is sometimes difficult to get through the page when you know what's going to happen...or at least think you know. This is a study of the idea of perfection, gods, happiness, and the missing invisible that determines these things to be true.
  • (4/5)
    Super creepy, great mystery and interesting plot. I couldn't put it down yet wished I could read while covering my eyes.
  • (4/5)
    I hadn't heard of this book or of Blake Crouch until I'd heard of a television show called Wayward Pines that was supposed to be coming out. It was compared to Twin Peaks and that was all I needed to know to be sold on it. So, when I was watching the first episode and noticed that there was a "based on" credit for a book series I made a mental note of it and went on with watching the show. By the time I started reading this book I had already completed the entire first season of the TV show. I just wanted to give that full disclosure before I continued.

    I found it to be really fun and exciting to compare and contrast the way the television show was done as compared to the source material, the book series. I loved seeing where things were similar and where they were vastly different. And boy! Were they vastly different for the most part! And, that's not a critique. I loved the television show and I love the first book (haven't read the others yet, so can't comment on those) as related works and as completely separate and individual works. They're wonderful.

    The way Crouch writes is very easy to read and follow and understanding. This was a page-turner that I could hardly put down and I practically devoured it. The book answered a lot of the lingering questions that I had after watching the first season of the show and almost all of the questions that the book itself with all of its differences raised for me as I read it.

    The only critique that I have is that there are places where it seems like Crouch could have done a little more research into certain things, but nothing altogether too drastic. I don't expect perfect adherence to science, for example, because when dealing with sci-fi elements you absolutely have to tweak things or even make things up. I just thought some of the tweaking and making-up-of-things in certain areas could've benefited by a bit more research. But, it's a nitpick rather than a true detraction. The book doesn't hurt for it.

    I would absolutely recommend this book series to someone else. In a heartbeat.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting. Will read the next book in the series.
  • (3/5)
    I picked up this book because I read an interview with one of the producers of the TV show (airing in the summer of 2015) who said he loved this story because it reminded him of Twin Peaks and even after reading it several times he couldn't believe that there were absolutely no plot holes. With such a high standard set going in, I don't see how I could possibly have been satisfied. And overall, I wasn't.Pines read like a mash-up of a half-dozen genre stories you've read (or seen) before. Simply listing them here would in effect be a major spoiler to the ending. Suffice it to say, Twin Peaks and The Prisoner offer only two of many motifs used in this book.The writing was serviceable enough. Crouch seems to know what he's doing. But a master craftsman, he is not. Let me lower your expectations. The characters are barely one dimensional. The pacing is haphazard, at best. The dialog is stilted. And those plot holes the producer denied? Maybe not big enough to drive trucks through, but they certainly exist in the form of dropped threads introduced and forgotten by the novel's end.Perhaps I'm meant to read the second and third book in this series to understand where those threads where going, but after the third act "reveal" in Pines (the big twist at the end) I don't have much desire. I haven't been this disappointed in a twist ending since the clown in It turned out to be an alien living in the sewers.Maybe I'll check out the TV show. My curiosity has not quite been sated.
  • (4/5)
    I started watching the TV show with the family this summer. In our house, tastes are diverse and it is rare find a show that two parents and a teenager are willing to watch together and enjoy. I tried to get this book, which the show is based on, from the library at the start of the tv series because I couldn't wait to find out what was the big mystery of Wayward Pines. As it turned out everyone else in my town had the same idea and I didn't get the book until the series had concluded. I was hesitant to still read it because after knowing what happened in the show I thought it was just going to be a rehash of the TV plot. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the book was just as a good as the show and it actually went in different plot directions. Both the book and the show begin when FBI agent Ethan Burke wakes up from a car crash in the town of Wayward Pines. Right off the bat you know something isn't quite right. Once you arrive in Wayward Pines you can never leave. I like that the book explored more of Ethan's background like his time as a prisoner of war in Iraq. By watching the show and reading the book you get more views into the Wayward lifestyle. Even though not everythinhg matched up (some character's fates were different) it was still congruent enough to make you feel both stories were happening in the same town. I enjoyed both book and TV series and look forward to reading the next book, Wayward.
  • (3/5)
    Possibly not the most literary of writers but the majority of this short novel is an enjoyable and quite gripping thriller in the vein of Lee Child, with surprising and unexplained scifi/supernatural(?) elements with a similar feel to James Herbert(!). But without giving too much away, the problem is that it finishes with a denouement when really what you want is a climax.
    So although most of the strange happenings in the story are explained in some detail, I was still left feeling a little cheated of what I was hoping for at the conclusion of the book.

    I understand that this is just part one of a trilogy, and for the majority of the book I was absorbed enough that I was looking forward to reading the rest of the series. Unfortunately by the end of the book, and as much as I enjoyed it, I feel I know enough about the story and don't care enough about the characters to be bothered to read the further two installments. At this point they feel more like optional extras than integral episodes...
  • (5/5)
    It's hard not to give this 5 stars. It was a great ending to the book, and even knowing I have the sequel in my hands, it would have been find as a standalone. The only thing you're missing in any of this is "what happens next?" I have never seen Twin Peaks ever, and any of the rest of that ilk was lost on me. This book, however, drew me in. I don't need anyone telling me "it's just like..." because it isn't. Don't expect it to be "just like" something else. Ever. It isn't like anything else you've read.
  • (4/5)
    Read it in a couple of evenings. Exciting and chilling explanation of our future. Is a little town just how we are most suited? What happens when it's equilibrium is upset? Chilling. Read it and see
  • (4/5)
    This was a pretty good book. I am looking forward to the next in the series. It's about this secret service agent, Ethan, who ends up in this town Wayward Pines and can't get out. He is trying to figure out what the town is, but can't get any answers. I found the book to be fast paced. Ethan was likable I was rooting for him throughout the whole book. Torn between giving it 3.5 and a 4.
  • (5/5)
    This is not a book that can afford multi-tasking. I have a tendency to read in hunks between work assignments etc. Divided attention does not work well. I got very confused in the last few chapters for a while.

    On the whole though this book has tons of action, suspense, and finally clarity. It was a really good read.
  • (4/5)
    FREAKY read. Lots of heart pounding stomach turning suspense! It's the 1st in a trilogy.
  • (5/5)


    It was easier to accept what could not be changed than to risk everything and seek out the unknown.
    -Chapter 9



    Wow. This book. It was like Stephen King, Shirley Jackson and the Twilight Zone all wrapped into one gorgeous package. I saw a couple of reviews on Booklikes and I knew there was a tv series coming, so I figured I had better get moving and read these books. Am I ever glad I did!!

    I don't want to give anything away. I'll just say that this is an amazing psychological thriller that you cannot miss. I loved every minute of it. It kept me guessing right up to the end. Read it before you watch. The books are almost always better, in my humble opinion.

    I'm already well into Book 2 - Wayward and I'm loving it too.

    Recommended to:
    Anyone who likes Stephen King or psychological thrillers or... reading. ;)

    --I was able to read this through Kindle Unlimited, but I think I want this book on my shelf.
  • (5/5)
    Secret Service Agent Ethan Burke wakes up on a road in the woods by a river. He has nothing but the clothes on his back and injuries. He's able to walk to the nearest town, a small place of just a few hundred people, surrounded by majestic mountains and the pine forest. It's beautiful, but Ethan begins to have flashes of memory, of being in a car with another agent, of being on a mission, being hit by a semi, watching the agent die. Ethan's time in the local hospital convinces him that he's being lied to and drugged, and that the sheriff is part of an effort to keep Ethan from leaving Wayward Pines.
  • (4/5)
    I downloaded this last year to take part in an online book club, but never got around to the reading part. Sorry, book club! Anyway, my contribution would have been positive - quick, standard fare, but wonderfully easy to devour in a few hours. Think Twin Peaks, the author's inspiration, crossed with The Village and a dash of The Truman Show. I thought I knew where the plot was going, but was still surprised - and a little bit let down - by the twist.The first half of the story is gripping and full of tension - well, for me anyway, because I hate reading about solo characters who are launched into Stepfordesque situations, one man against a community of oddballs pretending to be normal. Federal agent Ethan Burke wakes up injured and disorientated in Wayward Pines, Idaho, after his car is hit side-on by a Mack truck. He can't remember who he is and can barely walk, but the real trouble starts when he tries to retrieve his wallet and ID from the sheriff's office and get the hell out of Pines. I kept shouting at him, 'Don't go to the sheriff! Don't tell him that! Don't trust anyone!' Ethan is predictably resourceful - and seemingly indestructible - so I didn't worry about him for too long.The first part of a trilogy, Pines is basically all about Ethan trying to escape from a Stephen King novel. The second part is a build-up to the sequel. Entertaining and intriguing - not sure I'll be reading on, though.
  • (4/5)
    Welcome to Wayward Pines! Pines is one of those books that will make you question the things you see, the places you go and the people you know and don't know. Things are not always as it seems in Wayward Pines, Idaho and when Secret Service Agent Ethan Burke travels there to look in to the disappearance of two of his co-workers he soon finds that out. I can't say much more then that without giving away the story so you will just have to check it out. It was a little different from what I've been reading lately. It was sort of a mix of sci-fi, horror, thriller, mystery and dystopia/post-apocalyptic but I thoroughly enjoyed it. Once you read the first few pages, you're hooked and you won't want to put it down. It was definitely the fastest I've read a book in a while because I couldn't stand the thought of not knowing what was going to happen next. If you can, check out or buy all three books in the series at once so you'll have the next one on hand. Trust me, I'm wishing I would have done that!
  • (4/5)
    Great book. I felt like I was watching an episode of the Twilight Zone most of the time I was reading, which I loved! I just started watching the TV series as well last night and there are already quiet a few things different even in just the first episode. I recommend this book to any one who likes a good mystery!