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Fields of Grace: A Novel

Fields of Grace: A Novel

Written by Kim Vogel Sawyer

Narrated by Traci Svensgaard


Fields of Grace: A Novel

Written by Kim Vogel Sawyer

Narrated by Traci Svensgaard

ratings:
4.5/5 (11 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Released:
Aug 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781596447745
Format:
Audiobook

Description

With their eldest son nearly to the age when he will be drafted into military service, Reinhardt and Lillian Vogt decide to immigrate to America, the land of liberty, with their three sons and Reinhardt's adopted brother, Eli. But when tragedy strikes during the voyage, Lillian and Eli are forced into an agreement neither desires.

Determined to fulfill his obligation to Reinhardt, Eli plans to see Lillian and her sons safely settled on their Kansas homestead—and he's equally determined that the boys will be reared in the Mennonite faith. What he doesn't expect is his growing affection for Lillian—and the deep desire to be part of a family.

Released:
Aug 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781596447745
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Bestselling, award-winning author Kim Vogel Sawyer wears many hats besides “writer.” As a wife, mother, grandmother, and active participant in her church, her life is happily full. But Kim’s passion lies in writing stories of hope that encourage her readers to place their lives in God’s capable hands. An active speaking ministry assists her with her desire. Kim and her husband make their home on the beautiful plains of Kansas, the setting for many of Kim’s novels.


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Reviews

What people think about Fields of Grace

4.3
11 ratings / 9 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    If you like Christian historical fiction this is a great pic for you. The main characters must immigrate to America so their oldest son can avoid the military draft in Russia in the late 19th century. On their ocean voyage tragedy strikes and the wife must marry her brother in law in order for the family to be allowed to immigrate to America. I liked this book - it's not Nobel worthy literature, but then who expects that out of every book? I enjoyed it, learned a lot about the Mennonite faith, and really felt that I was in turn of the century Kansas.
  • (4/5)
    In 1872 Russia, Mennonites Reinhardt and Lillian Vogt fear their oldest son will be forced into military service, which is against their religious beliefs. Because of this, they decide to immigrate to America, where they will be free to practice their faith. Joining the couple and their three sons on the journey is Eli, Reinhardt’s adopted brother.The journey that should have been the start of their new life ends in tragedy, however, when Lillian’s husband and youngest son die on the sea voyage. In order to protect Lillian and her surviving children, and to keep the family together in America, Eli offers to marry Lillian in a marriage of convenience, to which she agrees. But as the family settles on a homestead in Kansas, Eli’s feelings towards Lillian change from obligation to love.Fields of Grace is a sweet, inspirational historical romance that is sure to appeal to fans of the genre. The story of Mennonites immigrating to America for freedom of religion is an interesting one, and the message of faith, hope, and love in the face of tragedy is a positive and uplifting one.
  • (4/5)
    Fields of Grace is a sweet story about Lillian, a Mennonite woman and her journey of heartache and joy. This story was the first I have read by Kim Vogel Sawyer, and also my first book about the Mennonites. I think Kim Vogel Sawyer did a fabulous job of writing this story. From the great detail and descriptions to the wonderful story line and characters I felt I was right there and a part of Lillian's family. I think this book is also a wonderful example of how Christians deal with the pain they face in their lives, and they struggles the go through, and it was an inspiration and encouragement to see God's grace working in Lillian's life. Story line: Lillian, her husband Reinhardt, and their three sons travel to America with their "Onkel Eli", Reinhardt's adopted brother. They must leave their native country so their oldest son, Hendrik does not have to enlist in the military. On the ship to America, Lillian's husband and youngest son die, and Lillian is faced with many decisions. Before they reach America, Eli and Lillian are married, because it would be improper for them to continue to travel together. Lillian is still grieving for her husband, and Eli is grieving for his friend, but he is happy that he finally has a family, something he has always wanted, and prayed for many times. In America, Eli helps Lillian get settled and is a father to her two sons. Her oldest son Hendrik is rebellious and as they start their new life in America, Lillian and Eli worry over what will become of him. After some time Lillian and Eli start to fall for each other, but will they be able to tell each other? Will it last, or will their son Hendrik, get in the way of it all?
  • (5/5)
    I haven't encountered much historical Christian fiction this well-written or intense. Sawyer does an excellent job with the story, though in places it goes rather slowly. Other than normal ARC editing issues which I can't hold them accountable for here (since by definition ARCs are not finished products), my only major complaint was that it was very similar in plot (though not in setting or characters) to another familiar Christian fiction story--Love Comes Softly. The biggest difference between the two stories is the level of writing in this one is much higher than in Love Comes Softly. Sawyer does a fantastic job of dealing with some very difficult scenes and doesn't shy away from dealing with the inner emotional lives of the main characters.I do agree with other reviewers that the front cover is misleading--the woman on the front cover couldn't be older than about 20, whereas the main female character in the book is supposed to be 38. I would have looked at this and assumed it was just another Amish romance novel, but it was the description on the back that sold me. 99.9% of the time authors have no control over the cover, so I can't deduct points for that, but if her publisher knows what they're doing they'll change the cover when this goes to print. (But points to the artist--it's a beautiful cover, just not right for this book.)
  • (4/5)
    This Christian romance was a delight to read with memorable characters and an interesting setting in the early days of American history as our country was being settled. My only minor complaints were a sometimes stilted writing style, which I assumed Kim Vogel Sawyer used to mimic the ebb and flow (or lack thereof) in low German. It sometimes the sentences awkward made -- if you take my meaning. I think a bit more editing on this front might have avoided any interruption of the reader's journey through the book. As it was, I found myself stopping periodically and wondering why, other than to be purposefully awkward, the sentences were structured the way they were. But this was admittedly not terribly often and overall did not take away from my reading of the book. My other wish was that the book were longer! I wanted to learn more about the characters. And this sort of complaint is high praise, and so, thank you Ms. Vogel Sawyer, for the grand job you did in your characterizations. I did not always like the way your protagonist behaved, but she was truly "her own person." Ultimately, this made her more interesting. I think this book begs for more in a series. I shall watch for more installments.
  • (3/5)
    Christian author Sawyer has penned another book about Mennonites in Kansas. Since this is her family's heritage, it's a topic of understandable importance to her. The copy I read was an unedited reviewer's copy that was issued back in May by the publisher. I hope that some changes may have been made since then as I found parts of the story somewhat implausible. Of course, everyone knows that pioneers had nothing but problems on the prairie. Set in 1872, this book is no exception to the pioneer story. The father and youngest child in the family die during the ocean crossing. A hasty marriage aboard ship insures that all can continue to Kansas with an appearance of propriety. Love blooms, dies, blooms, dies and... Well, I don't want to spoil the ending. Parts of the book are quite engrossing, but I found it questionable that someone who supposedly loved the Lord and her new husband as much as Lillian did, could act so nastily for so long and in such close quarters. My other quibble is with the cover of this book, which I'm sure is not the author's fault. The main character, who is presumably on the cover, is a thirty-eight-year-old woman who has just spent a year in a prairie sod house after having immigrated from Russia in 1872 and suffering immense tragedies in her life. My image of that woman does not fit what I see on the cover of this book at all. Come on, artists, people age, rather than looking younger after surviving in such circumstances.
  • (4/5)
    Field of Grace was a really good book. At first I didn't think I would like it because I usually can't get into a book like it, but this one was able to hold my interest. The hardship that the family goes through to earn their free will to live their life and religion away from the Government. I would recommend this book for others to read, because it really was a good book.
  • (4/5)
    I was so excited when I found out I was one of the ones to review this new book of Kim Vogel Sawyer. I'd never read anything by her before and am glad I had the chance to read this book. Very interesting how she goes back to the beginning of when the Mennonites started coming to America. You see the hard work and heartache they went through in this book and what people really had to go through back then to start new. Always been a sucker for reading books about convient marriage, so when a proposal is given, I was really getting into the book. Loved how she brought grace into the book. How each one of them needed grace. Enjoyed reading this book, although it wasn't my favorite book I've ever read, I will say that I would read another book by her again. Can't wait to see it come out in stores!
  • (5/5)
    First I would like to thank everyone at Library Thing for picking out this book to send to me for review. If I had a choice of what book this would have been the book for me. Kim Vogel ( Vogel is another form of Voelkel my surname) has enlightened us on what it was like to leave your home and travel to the new world to start over. This book is similar to my grandfathers journey to Canada only a few years later ( 1878). We have insight into why many left their home - conscription into the army or religious persecution. It gives an insight into the hardships endured on the crossing to North America. Here we are strangers in a new world no friends, language barriers, money exchange problems etc. This story really grabs your attention and keeps it. The twist to the love story is great. As well the beliefs of the family remind us as to what we should be doing. Thank you for a great book