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Pygmalion

Pygmalion


Pygmalion

ratings:
4/5 (32 ratings)
Length:
1 hour
Released:
Dec 6, 2000
ISBN:
9781580815048
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

One of Shaw’s most enduring works, Pygmalion is an insightful comedy of class relations and perceptions, as played out between a Cockney flower girl and the irascible speech professor who has taken her on as a pet project. Described by critics as “a play of great vitality and charm,” Pygmalion inspired the award-winning stage and film productions of Lerner and Loewe’s musical, My Fair Lady.

An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring Roslyn Alexander, Shannon Cochran, Denise du Maurier, Rebecca MacLean, David New, Kenneth J. Northcott, Nicholas Pennell, Nicholas Rudall, Ben Whitehouse and Laura Whyte.
Released:
Dec 6, 2000
ISBN:
9781580815048
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

George Bernard Shaw was born in Dublin in 1856 and moved to London in 1876. He initially wrote novels then went on to achieve fame through his career as a journalist, critic and public speaker. A committed and active socialist, he was one of the leaders of the Fabian Society. He was a prolific and much lauded playwright and was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature. He died in 1950.



Reviews

What people think about Pygmalion

3.8
32 ratings / 35 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    Pygmalionby George Bernard Shaw 1916Washington Square Press 3.9 / 5When Henry Higgins, a linguist, meets cockney flower girl Eliza Doolittle, he makes a bet with his friend Colonel Pickering that he can teach her to speak such perfect English that she could pass as a duchess in polite High Society.He forgets that Eliza is an independent woman, and will not be bought and coddled. Classified under the genre of romance by many, to me, it was also a study of class relations and the perceptions and attitudes towards gender that were prevailing at that time, early 1900's. I really enjoyed the book, but gave it only 3.9 stars. Why? Henry Higgins. The characters are so well developed with a depth and diversity, I felt an instant understanding of them. I just did not like Higgins. At all.This was first a stage play, introduced to the public in 1913, and first printed in 1914. This went on to be the musical 'My Fair Lady' and is an unforgettable book.
  • (3/5)
    Leuk en vlot, spitse dialogen. Sociaal document: moeilijkheid van klasse te doorbreken. Verwijzingen naar Frankenstein zeer duidelijk
  • (3/5)
    Leuk en vlot, spitse dialogen. Sociaal document: moeilijkheid van klasse te doorbreken. Verwijzingen naar Frankenstein zeer duidelijk
  • (4/5)
    For those of us who are familiar only with the movie version titled My Fair Lady, the real story of this play might come as something of a surprise. It did to me! I don't want to spoil anything, but it's fascinating to see how the version starring Rex Harrison and Audrey Hepburn was changed to please its audience in 1964. Apparently the end of the play has been a tug-of-war between George Bernard Shaw and the public (and some critics) since its first performance in 1912. I have to say I'm with the public... sorry, George.This LA Theatre production is a live play that was recorded to create an audio performance. So along with the excitement and energy of a live recording, you also get the flaws: different volume levels as the actors move toward or away from the microphones, audience applause, etc. But, taking it for what it is, I enjoyed it very much. It is brilliantly acted; Shannon Cochran as Eliza is especially good. I also liked the actor who plays Mr. Doolittle, and really everyone performs well. It was fun to imagine the actors on a stage rather than in front of a microphone in a recording studio. The play is very witty and nonsensical, abounding in comic misunderstandings and hilarious reversals of cultural norms. It is, in a word, George Bernard Shaw. And yet for all its fun, it does address serious issues such as women's independence and the strict social class system that based so much of its value judgments on external accoutrements (like a person's accent). Very little is safe from Shaw's satirical eye, but somehow his characters escape being cardboard cutouts displaying particular vices. They're attractive and fun, even the selfish ones. It's the good humor behind everything that does it.Though this is certainly no studio production, it was very enjoyable. I'm not really one for reading plays; they are designed to be experienced as a performance, not a silent reading. If you can't see a play, the next-best thing is to hear it. I recommend it!
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this particular edition as it includes a "sequel". I have read this before but probably never with so much attention. The "learned Bernard" packs so much in 150 pages it would take one months to study the play thoroughly. Was it about class and gender, ignited by the memory of the changes brought about by the Great War? Or was it something more far-reaching, more contemporary, more futuristic?
  • (5/5)
    Well done ensemble recording of this famous play. I particularly appreciated the fact that Shaw's commentary (both before and after the play) and stage directions (for the most part) were included.I was a little surprised by Shaw's exposition explaining that Eliza does NOT end up marrying Higgins but Freddy!!! His description of what results from this marriage is satirical in tone but he is quite definite in this sequel to the events of the play.