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Backtalk: 4 Steps to Ending Rude Behavior in Your Kids

Backtalk: 4 Steps to Ending Rude Behavior in Your Kids


Backtalk: 4 Steps to Ending Rude Behavior in Your Kids

ratings:
4/5 (9 ratings)
Length:
1 hour
Released:
Aug 1, 1998
ISBN:
9780743541848
Format:
Audiobook

Description

"So what? All the other kids get to do it!"

Few behavioral problems challenge and frustrate parents, caregivers, and teachers as does verbal rudeness in children of any age. Reinforced by the wise-cracking kids on TV and in the movies, backtalk has become all too common among today's youngsters. But there is nothing cute about this behavior. Remarks like "Yeah, right," "Big deal," and "Make me" -- from children as young as three -- get in the way of real communication between parents and kids, and can also be detrimental to a child's social and intellectual development.

Now, two experts in the field share their simple and specific four-step program for ending backtalk and restoring balance in relationships between parents and children, from preschoolers to teens. You'll learn how to recognize backtalk, how to choose and enact a response that will make sense to you and the backtalker, and when to disengage from the struggle and move forward. Full of advice and encouragement as well as suggestions on how to keep track of what works and what doesn't, Backtalk can be put to use immediately, before you hear another "Whatever."

Released:
Aug 1, 1998
ISBN:
9780743541848
Format:
Audiobook

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Reviews

What people think about Backtalk

3.9
9 ratings / 3 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    This book has great advice in how to deal with those 'snarky' remarks that kids make, without making a hostile enviorment at home. It is hard to implement the steps that the author recommends only becuase kids are quick to turn around, beg and whine and also they know how to push your buttons. But I would recommend this book because everything they talk about, examples they give I have seen and they explain how to deal with it all. Although I don't agree with how they deal with adult children, hey, if they are talking to you that way at that age, you have allowed it! Just to turn around on a dime and put their things out the door and change their bedroom I think is harsh and not warrented unless you have given a warning.It is an easy read and I do recommend it for parents/adults who are having problems with the younger set.
  • (4/5)
    While the sections on teenagers and younger children are obvious this book proceeds into the college years. During these years the child on the verge of adulthood starts questioning the values and education of the parent.
  • (4/5)
    I found this book very helpful and informative within it's limited focus. The system in this book reminds me of how friends of mine discipline their children which I much admire. It is simple and easy to implement: recognize, choose consequence, enact, and disengage. The book has chapters for dealing with other adults who don't support your methods, and using the system on college age and adult children. Actually you can use this system on anyone, it is a system based on behaving respectfully and withdrawing support from disrespectful people.There are a few minor problems I have with the book. They spend too much time criticizing "progressive parenting" and "the media". I would rather they just explained their method. The only problem I have with their method is that I'm susceptible to the "just give me another chance" and "guilt" arguments from children, which must be resisted. Also they point out that children do this to feel powerful, and I sympathize with children feeling powerless. I'm in favor of empowering children. But they make a good argument children are better off in life if they are taught how to behave properly. I wish they spent more time on not "rubbing it in". Discipline is about the consequences of actions, not punishment. Lording your power over your children makes discipline into a power struggle and takes away any good that might have resulted. That only comes up once, in the last chapter. And I wish they spent more time discussing positive ways to help children find significance and a sense of belonging within the family, but that is probably outside the scope of this text. I give it 4 out of 5 stars for good practical advice clearly explained. 1 star off for spending too much time criticizing the competition.