Enjoy millions of ebooks, audiobooks, magazines, and more

Only $11.99/month after trial. Cancel anytime.

Anne of the Island

Anne of the Island

Written by L. M. Montgomery

Narrated by Renee Raudman


Anne of the Island

Written by L. M. Montgomery

Narrated by Renee Raudman

ratings:
4/5 (48 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 25, 2008
ISBN:
9781400176373
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

Description

New adventures lie ahead as Anne Shirley packs her bags, waves good-bye to childhood, and heads for Redmond College. With old friend Prissy Grant waiting in the bustling city of Kingsport and frivolous new pal Philippa Gordon at her side, Anne tucks her memories of rural Avonlea away and discovers life on her own terms, filled with surprises...including a marriage proposal from the worst fellow imaginable, the sale of her very first story, and a tragedy that teaches her a painful lesson. But tears turn to laughter when Anne and her friends move into an old cottage and an ornery black cat steals her heart. Little does Anne know that handsome Gilbert Blythe wants to win her heart, too. Suddenly, Anne must decide if she's ready for love.

Publisher:
Released:
Feb 25, 2008
ISBN:
9781400176373
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author


Related to Anne of the Island

Titles in the series (37)

Related Audiobooks

Related Articles


Reviews

What people think about Anne of the Island

4.2
48 ratings / 53 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    The third book in the "Anne of Green Gables" series sees Anne leave Avonlea and start life at Richmond College where new friends are made and more challenges faced. I loved the introduction of Philippa Gordon, who ends up sharing a house with Anne. She was so much fun with her quirky, loveable nature and incapability to make any firm decision.I have always been a big fan of Anne and Gilbert, although this time I could have screamed in frustration at Anne's inability to see how much Gilbert loved her until right at the end. However, thankfully, she came to her senses before it was too late.As for Ruby, I had forgotten what happened to her, and Montgomery wrote of her passing with such beauty and gentleness, it brought tears to my eyes. Now it's onto the next book.
  • (3/5)
    A country girl goes to college.2.5/4 (Okay).It's pretty good when it focuses on the plot. It rarely does, though. And there's a new character, Phil, that I like enough that I'm almost tempted to keep reading the series. Almost. Being somewhat bored for three books is enough Montgomery for me, at least for a long while.
  • (5/5)
    This is probably my favorite of the series because it's got the most romance. :) Sometimes I will skip Anne of Avonlea and just go straight from the first one to this one.
  • (5/5)
    Call me, Gilbert Blythe!
  • (3/5)
    This is a good love story. We get to see Anne grow up and finally be honest with herself.
  • (5/5)
    Anne of the Island picks up the story with Anne, Gilbert, and Charlie going off to Redmond College. Mrs. Lynde, now a widow, has moved in with Marilla at Green Gables, thus enabling Anne to go off to school. So Anne joins the ranks of the coeds and has her college years enriched by new friendships and academic challenges. The romantic tension picks up in this story, with Gilbert declaring himself and meeting with a firm rebuff. Anne is certain that he doesn't fit her ideal, though she values him greatly as a friend. When a tall, dark, melancholy man does come along, Anne is swept off her feet and only realizes at the last moment how flat life would be with a humorless hero. Anne is a believable character; she makes mistakes in her relationships and suffers the humiliations and jealousies that most people experience at some point in their lives. I have always enjoyed this installment because Anne is an adult, but very much still herself. Her adventures at Redmond are always less important than the characters and their interactions. I get the impression that Redmond and really all the external circumstances of Anne's history are frames for the character sketches and funny episodes at which Montgomery excels. I love the descriptions of Anne's girlfriends in college; Philippa Gordon has to be one of the funniest, most lovable side characters in fiction. Aunt Jamesina isn't bad either, though I've always felt we didn't get to see enough of her. I found it interesting that Montgomery makes an effort in several places to defend humor. At one point she has Anne quote one of their professors, who says that humor is the best condiment for the feast life spreads for us. Montgomery's body of work testifies to this truth and I'm thankful to partake of her contribution to the feast. This is a very satisfying read and another of my favorites in the series. Long live Anne!
  • (5/5)
    Each Anne book is just so amazing. I love how Ms. Montgomery tailors the writing a little more grown up as Anne gets more grown up. Fun characters, witty dialogue and a fun storyline.
  • (5/5)
    Anne's tale continues with her 4 years at a university in Nova Scotia, with summers and holidays on PEI. A few of her chums from PEI are also at school with her, plus she meets new friends, bids goodbye to a childhood classmate who dies of consumption, almost gets engaged, rejects Gilbert's (and two other) proposals, and in the end is back in Avonlea, a graduate, and finally realizes that she's in love with Gilbert.
  • (5/5)
    Read my full review here.

    It’s no surprise that I love this book since all of Anne’s stories so far have been charming and funny and magical. There’s nothing like it, and the series will always hold a special place in my heart.

    In Anne of Avonlea we get to see Anne mature, and in this book she matures even more. Sure, she’s still imaginative and fanciful and often-times immature, but those instances became fewer as Anne became refined. Obtaining a B.A. was a dream of her’s and I think her four years at college have helped push her into adulthood. She’s worked hard, lived away from home, and visited the place she was born.

    Something so great about this book is that while Gilbert isn’t a huge presence physically, he does tend to be on Anne’s mind. The two are obviously very close, but Anne is terrified of growing up and everything changing - something that is quite relatable to everyone - so she’s blind to her true feelings. I do think she knew deep down she’s in love with him, but she was scared and so was like in denial.

    But because of this again we see Anne grow over the course of the novel, and the moment when they finally get together is very sweet. I can’t wait to read the next book so I can see them happy together.

    I would be remiss if I didn’t say, again, that Montgomery is so good at describing things. And she certainly knows how to create a huge cast of unique and interesting characters. She’s such a talent and her writing is a joy to read.

    Overall, Anne of the Island is a wonderful book.
  • (4/5)
    Here we are again! Book 3 of the Anne Shirley series.....Each book gets better. L.M. is giving Anne such maturity in this installment. Anne leaves home for college, finds new friends, connects with old ones, and falls in love.Another one that I didn't want to put down. I read it through in 2 sittings.
  • (3/5)
    Would that I had been about 16 when I read this.
    This is Anne of Green Gables growing up, finding her place in the world, establishing great girlfriends, finding herself in the midst of studies, coming to terms with the meaning of death and life, understanding that friends can grow up and away, and of course, discovering love.

    Oh, would that I had been 16 when I turned the pages of these books! This is meant for someone who is soul-searching, who is a young adult wondering if college is all that people say it is, who is hoping to find love. Not just love, but love.

    I would have given it 4 stars if the romance was a little more realistic with more depth. Why were they so compatible? It's not really explained. You hardly see them talking - mostly Anne just going on one of her poetic spiels (lovely as they are, they do not showcase romantic love). And goodness, Roy is just too annoyingly perfect to even like his presence in the book. He's too much of a plot device and not enough of a character.

    I really, really enjoyed Phil because she was silly and vapid-sounding, but she wasn't. Not at all. And I love that characters (and people, ultimately) are not all that they seem on the surface. It is depth and layers and it is beautiful.

    I do have some quibbles with book - I am sometimes annoyed at the many monologues that Anne gets. What person who tolerate someone stream-of-conscience-ing them for so long as if who she was talking to didn't matter? Or how sometimes the book sounds very rude. For example, when Montgomery always makes the reference that Charlie was a Sloane, and everyone knows what Sloane's are like. Maybe it's because it's such an old book and a small town and that's what it's like, but for me (suburb, city girl in the 21st century), it completely rude and unfair.

    But ultimately, there is a reason Anne is a classic. Beautiful.

    3.5 stars. Oh, how I wish I were 16.

    -note-
    I realized I skipped book 2, and apparently that's where the romance builds between Anne and Gilbert, so there's that.
  • (5/5)
    [Re-read 2013]

    Still one of my favorites of the Anne series. I especially love Anne's growth here, learning to understand her own romantic notions. And oh how I wish I could spend a week (or a year) living with the chums in Patty's Place.
  • (4/5)
    Anne leaves her home and teaching job in Avonlea to pursue the college degree and scholarship she gave up to take care of Marilla.
  • (3/5)
    Some laugh out loud moments, some moments were it seemed a little to happy-go-lucky. Over all, fairly successful for a third book in a series.

    I think what knocked that fourth star off for me was the chick flick ending sort of thing. I knew it was coming, but it just didn't end the story in a very creative way. Other then that this book was rather timely for me, as I am just completing my senior year of university. Going to a conservative Christian University I could still relate to it pretty well, especially the idea of all your friends getting married off and having babies and such. I think the first book will always be my favorite though.
  • (5/5)
    Like a breeze of fresh air, going back to the world of Avonlea and the characters of Anne, Gilbert, Diana, and their friends and family gives me the most refreshing feeling. And in this one we get to see Anne and Gilbert's relationship change, though not without some major bumps in the road. Anne's life as a college student at Redmond with her friends old and new becomes a time for her to learn many lessons about life. A most satisfying read that I would recommend to anyone!
  • (5/5)
    L.M. Montgomery's irrepressible red-headed heroine, Anne Shirley - she of the high ideals, fiery temper, and elfin beauty - returns in this third volume devoted to her adventures, first published in 1915, and following upon the initial Anne of Green Gables (1908), and its first sequel, Anne of Avonlea (1909). Picking up one week after the events of the preceding book, Anne of the Island is the story of Anne's four years at Redmond College, and follows her as she leaves the island - Prince Edward Island, that is - for the fictional town of Kingsport, Nova Scotia. Here she plunges into the labor and leisure of the college experience - her studies, in which (predictably) she excels in English; her friends, both old and new; her living situation, first in a boarding house, and then in the delightful Patty's Place; and finally, her first serious "beaus" (and proposals!) - emerging, in the end, transformed from girl to woman.I have always loved this book, enjoying everything from the love-triangle involving Anne, Gilbert Blythe and Royal Gardner, to the many little holiday and summer interludes, in which Anne returns to Avonlea, and to her circle of family and friends at Green Gables. The doings of those four college girls - Priscilla Grant and Stella Maynard, two of Anne's old school chums from Queens; Philippa Gordon, a flighty but lovable rich girl whom the others meet for the first time at Redmond; and Anne herself - who take up residence together, make for an engaging story (I particularly adore the three cats!), and I cannot think of Patty's Place without wishing that I too had had the experience of living in such a house, while in college!Of course, this being L.M. Montgomery, it isn't all sweetness and light, and the early death of Ruby Gillis - one of Anne's grade-school chums - from consumption, provides a poignant counter-balance to the more carefree aspects of the story. While there's no doubt that this particular part of the novel functions as a cautionary tale - so much so, that a number of other reviewers have found it offensively preachy - I have always been moved by Anne's genuine struggle, in her discussion with Ruby, to articulate her own inchoate beliefs about the metaphysical. This balancing of the inner and outer life - of the everyday and the eternal - is something I always find particularly well done, in Montgomery's work, and in her characters.All in all, Anne of the Island was as delightful on this reread (hard to say how many times it's been), as the first time I encountered it! I think I may reread the next "Anne" book - Anne of Windy Poplars - sooner, rather than later.
  • (5/5)
    Bitter must be mixed with sweet as life goes on, and goes on changing, but in going on for Anne, "with the blowing of the west wind old dreams returned," making it all worth it. A number of points made me sigh, as well as laugh; I literally laughed aloud during Anne's First Proposal. Goodness, Montgomery was a genius.
  • (4/5)
    I never read the Anne books before, and I'm loving them! I'm listening on Audible and love the narration.
  • (4/5)
    By this, the third book of the series, Anne is a young woman and after working for a couple of years as a teacher, she has saved enough money to go to University in Nova Scotia. Some of her friends are also enrolling at Redmond, and she makes new friends as well. By the second year, tired of boarding houses, there are four girls who decided to rent their own house and together with the elderly Aunt Jimsie, as a chaperone, they set up house for the remaining three years. Friday nights are designated as the evening for receiving gentlemen callers and these attractive girls have plenty of those. Gilbert Blythe is a regular and it is very obvious to everyone that he has deep feelings for Anne. Anne who is very fond of her childhood chum, dreads having to hurt him, As Anne leaves girlhood behind and matures into a young woman, there is little trace of the orphan girl that was. Anne has become serene, sensible and very steady in purpose. In one area however, she seems to lag behind her friends and as she attends one wedding after another, she appears to not be able to see the love that is right in front of her, instead she is still holding out for that elusive Prince Charming that she imagined as a young girl. It takes a dark time and an almost tragedy for Anne to be able to understand where her heart is leading her.I am loving my re-reading of this series, and have come to love Anne as much now as I did when a girl.
  • (3/5)
    It took me quite a long time to read this book, even though it's reasonably short. I think that's because I wasn't enjoying it as much as I thought I would. I really loved the first two books in the series, but this one sort of fell flat for me.It is beautifully written, but I was getting bored of all the descriptions and stuff when the story was going nowhere. I also found a couple of the characters really annoying (Especially Phil, ugh).
  • (4/5)
    Anne of Avonlea was one of my childhood favorites. The series follows Anne on her many escapades, through funny and memorable adventures alike. Anne has every stubborn and quirky quality found in any girl...and her love of life is contagious. When I think of these books I am transported to a field of green and a warm summer wind.
  • (4/5)
    Note: While this is Book 3 in the series it works just fine as a stand alone.Anne Shirley is growing up and now in her late teens, she has the opportunity to go to college. Set in 1915, Redmond College in Nova Scotia, Canada is the nearest and best choice for her. Her dear friend Priscilla Grant also enrolls. Gilbert Blythe and Charlie Sloane, childhood friends, are returning for their second year of education. While there, Anne meets Philippa (Phil) Gordon who she becomes good friends with despite Phil’s honest vanity.I missed these classics when I was kid but I have enjoyed the trilogy as an adult. Book 1 is still my favorite as I feel Anne has the most imagination and the silliest accidents in that book. Now that she’s an adult, she still has much to learn but she doesn’t have as much imagination nor does she have so many simple mistakes and accidents. No, her blunders are fewer but also are more serious, especially in matters of the heart.Much of this book had to do with romance. Sigh. It seems that all the young people go off to college to find a spouse and if they happen to get a degree along the way, so much the better for it. While the ladies have some depth to them in this tale, the men are pretty much just stick figures. Even poor Gilbert Blythe has little to do with the tale. We learn so little about him that I as the reader could project any traits I like onto him to make him the perfect match for Anne. So I would have liked less romance and more details about the characters.With that said, the ladies have their hands full learning how to manage their lives away from home. Anne discovers that she does have a soft spot for cats after all. While Phil usually lacks a filter between brain and mouth, I did find her honesty about everything, including her own faults, to be amusing. One of the ladies gets a Math degree which I thought was great considering the date this was set in and published. (Though we rarely see any of the ladies doing anything related to their studies, since they spend so much time gossiping about the men).The most touching scene for me was when Anne returned to her birthplace. Phil happens to be from there and she invites Anne to come visit during one of their breaks from college. Anne has long wondered about her parents. Going to Bolingbroke held a lot of importance for Anne.After much drama about Anne’s love life, the story wraps up rather quickly. Things are tied up neatly and with a happy ending.I received a free copy of this book. Narration: Colleen Winton once again makes a great Anne. I like how she manages to make Anne sound a little older with each book while also managing to make her be distinctly Anne. Her male voices were also spot on as well as her elderly voices. Anne has a range of serious emotions in this book and Winton did great in capturing them with all their nuances.
  • (4/5)
    Audio book performed by Susan O’Malley

    In book three of the series, Anne Shirley goes away to Redmond College, along with Gilbert Blythe and Charlie Sloane. She rooms with her old friend Prissy Grant, and a new friend Philippa Gordon. College life has some surprises in store for Anne, including more than one marriage proposal and a possible new career as a writer.

    I never read these books as a child, but I am certainly enjoying them now. Anne is a marvelously engaging character – intelligent, naïve one minute, sensible the next, caring, loyal, and enthusiastic. If memory serves (it’s been over 40 years, after all), the interactions of the college roommates seems spot on perfect for students of that age. Oh, the excitement of young love – and the indecision! There are still scenes that take place on the island, of course, as Anne returns home for holidays, but the focus of the book is her college experiences as she grows into a young woman.

    Susan O’Malley does a fine job performing the audio book. She has good skill with various voices, easily differentiating the characters.
  • (4/5)
    All the usual adjectives apply -- charming, sweet, touching, etc, etc. And oh, how my heart stopped at some moments. And the end is just lovely.
  • (1/5)
    When I first joined GoodReads, I went through and marked a lot of childhood favorites with the number of stars I remembered them earning from me. I reflexively marked all the Anne books with lots of stars. I've long had a soft spot for Anne, and I know I read this series several times as a kid. Had you asked me last month, I would have professed to loving the entire series. Then I embarked on a project to revisit them, and oh how sorry I am that I did. The first book was a delight. The second, not so much. And now this one.

    It is with a heavy heart that I confess to loathing this book this time through. I can't stand the verbal quirks Montgomery assigns, especially to Davy "I want to know" and Mrs. Rachel "That's what". I hate the simplistic and treacly Christianity. The scene where Anne tells the dying Ruby what Heaven is like honestly made me queasy. The prose is positively purple throughout.

    I can't believe I'm saying this, but I hate this book. A lot.
  • (3/5)
    I like this one in the series as well. Although, I will say, I kinda like the Kevin Sullivan version better...
  • (5/5)
    This is one of my favorite volumes of the Anne series. I think I enjoy it for the romance, the friendships, and the number of proposals Anne racks up even if several are not very complimentary. Update: Well, the end is a little mushier than I remembered with Anne and Gilbert walking together and building their fantasy life while talking together as no real people ever would. The proposal from the hired boy completely makes up for it though!

    Listened to Blackstone Audio's CD edition narrated by Susan O'Malley. I don't think O'Malley's great so far, she doesn't do a very good job of differentiating among the girls' voices, but I like her better than Barbara Caruso - at least she pronounces Avonlea like a normal person and Davy's voice is much better in this one. After finishing, I'd say O'Malley does a competant job.

    Previously read many times.
  • (4/5)
    audiobook - This, the 3rd book in the Anne of Green Gables series, had a different narrator whom I liked better. She made Anne sound more adult (which, obviously, she is) and she was really good at the different voices. It was probably my favorite Anne book so far; I like that Anne isn't nearly as whiny and annoying as she was in the previous books. The whole Roy vs. Gilbert thing didn't really move me, but that might be due to cultural/language differences between Anne's time and mine.
  • (4/5)
    anne is a little too goodie-goodie. and why doesn't she want gilbert?. didn't like the reader. she gushes. the story is already gushy. a little tone-down would have been better.
  • (5/5)
    This book makes me frustrated with Anne - she lets her imagination run away with herself and makes a muddle of her life. Things I like about this book - the delightful picture of Patty's Place - I wish I had lived somewhere like this when I was going to college! The way in which Anne finally has her eyes opened and the way the resolution of Anne's romantic life somehow resolves Marilla's too in a sort of karmic way. The comedic moments that still find their way into Anne's life, despite the fact that she is more adult than child now.