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Mornings on Horseback

Mornings on Horseback

Written by David McCullough

Narrated by Nelson Runger


Mornings on Horseback

Written by David McCullough

Narrated by Nelson Runger

ratings:
4/5 (496 ratings)
Length:
19 hours
Released:
Jan 4, 2011
ISBN:
9781442342132
Format:
Audiobook

Description

FROM THE #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF JOHN ADAMS
Winner of the 1982 National Book Award for Biography, Mornings on Horseback is the brilliant biography of the young Theodore Roosevelt. Hailed as a masterpiece by Newsday, it is the story of a remarkable little boy -- seriously handicapped by recurrent and nearly fatal attacks of asthma -- and his struggle to manhood.
His father -- the first Theodore Roosevelt, "Greatheart," -- is a figure of unbounded energy, enormously attractive and selfless, a god in the eyes of his small, frail namesake. His mother -- Mittie Bulloch Roosevelt -- is a Southerner and celebrated beauty.
Mornings on Horseback spans seventeen years -- from 1869 when little "Teedie" is ten, to 1886 when he returns from the West a "real life cowboy" to pick up the pieces of a shattered life and begin anew, a grown man, whole in body and spirit.
This is a tale about family love and family loyalty...about courtship, childbirth and death, fathers and sons...about gutter politics and the tumultuous Republican Convention of 1884...about grizzly bears, grief and courage, and "blessed" mornings on horseback at Oyster Bay or beneath the limitless skies of the Badlands.
Released:
Jan 4, 2011
ISBN:
9781442342132
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

David McCullough has twice received the Pulitzer Prize, for Truman and John Adams, and twice received the National Book Award, for The Path Between the Seas and Mornings on Horseback. His other acclaimed books include The Johnstown Flood, The Great Bridge, Brave Companions, 1776, The Greater Journey, The American Spirit, The Wright Brothers, and The Pioneers. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award. Visit DavidMcCullough.com.



Reviews

What people think about Mornings on Horseback

4.1
496 ratings / 35 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    way too short!
  • (5/5)
    I hereby join the chorus in praise of David McCullough. He's great. The NY "Times" calls him "our best social historian," and I'll certainly go along with that.In this book we get a closeup of "Teedy," as he was called by his family. In spite of a sickly, challenging childhood, TR grew up utterly indefatigable. His public life never swerved from the dictates of his conscience, and he changed America by running independently in 1912 (in the election that gave us Woodrow Wilson). The book points obliquely to a yearning to measure up to his over-achieving father, but Teddy's eventual accomplishment cannot be overstated. I finished this book (which devotes only a handful of pages at the end to TR's Presidency, BTW) with a much fuller appreciation of that fellow whose rightful place is in Mt. Rushmore.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic look into Theodore Roosevelt's childhood and years as a young adult. I'm not entirely sure what I think of him as an adult (I thought he was great when I was young, but as I learned more about history that untarnished view was...well...tarnished). But at the very least, the dude had a crazy adolescence.
  • (5/5)
    I tend to love biographical works by David McCullough and Mornings on Horseback is no exception. Covering the early years of Theodore Roosevelt's life and the lives of his parents and siblings, Mornings on Horseback gives insight to what made up the personality of the greatest American President (in my opinion) that this country ever had. The book goes from early childhood through the announcement of his engagement and marriage to Edith Carow and his re-entry into NY politics with the loss of his run for Mayor.
  • (3/5)
    Some how,, most of McCullough's books leave me wanting more - and not in a good way. Mornings on Horseback is an interesting read on early TR, but I'm glad I had read the Morris and Brand biographies first.
  • (4/5)
    Mornings on Horseback by David McCullough covers the start of the Roosevelt family in United States with many unusual characters and the young Theodore Roosevelt. I was relieved that it was not going to attempt covering his whole life. His life is so interesting and there are so many letters and documents that I think it would have been an overwhelming project. I have already ready read Theodore Roosevelt's book on the Rough Riders (book handed down to me from my grandmother) and intend to slowly cover all parts of his life. I listened to this book on CD and was a little confused by the first CD and part of the second CD, I think that part could have been shortened. But when the story got to Teddy Roosevelt father, I was quickly won over. His father was idealistic and believed in doing the right thing over winning in politics. Had he lived longer, he may have been our first president. He saw to it that his children were well traveled and loved his family with a vigor.Young Theodore was plagued with asthma and the remedies of the times were horrifying, he also seemed awkward. Part of the latter could be that he was later found to be very nearsighted. When he got his first pair of glasses he was delighted and amazed about the world he had been missing. His father gave him a gun and that began his interest in shooting and stuffing them. I so wish that he had been given a camera instead! I learned that I shared a trait with Theodore! He was a persistent researcher. There are problems with that we have both identified! It is hard to know when to start.I really enjoyed the parts about his adventures of being a rancher and it was so sad to learn about the tragedies of his life.I highly recommend the audio version of Mornings on Horseback. There are loads of great stories and fact about Theodore Roosevelt and the story seems to get more addictive as it proceeded.