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Still with Me

Still with Me

Written by Thierry Cohen

Narrated by Nick Podehl


Still with Me

Written by Thierry Cohen

Narrated by Nick Podehl

ratings:
3.5/5 (3 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Released:
Dec 11, 2012
ISBN:
9781469252957
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Since its initial publication in France, Still with Me has been published in 15 countries. The book won France's Grand Prix Jean d'Ormesson in 2007.

Jeremy takes his life on his twentieth birthday after childhood friend Victoria rejects his love.

On his twenty-first birthday, he wakes up.

Victoria is at his side, blissfully in love with him. While Jeremy can't remember the previous year, he savors the miracle of waking up alongside the woman he loves.

The next time he wakes, another year has passed and he finds himself a spectator of his own life. Victoria now carries his child, but the man alongside her is a disturbingly different person-a cruel, egotistical, seemingly unknowable Jeremy. Is it amnesia? Insanity? Or has the God Jeremy defied with his selfish act now cursed him?

This strange and beautiful novel tells the tale of a man lost between life and death, but connected by the love -- as friend, lover, son, and father -- given and taken over the course of a lifetime, a love that simply won't let go.

Released:
Dec 11, 2012
ISBN:
9781469252957
Format:
Audiobook

About the author


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Reviews

What people think about Still with Me

3.3
3 ratings / 3 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Still with Me by Thierry Cohen; (3 1/2*)I found this book to be uniquely & hauntingly eerie. It is the story of a young man who commits or attempts (?) to commit suicide upon the spurning of his one & only love. But he wakens to find himself married to the young woman and the father of a new baby boy. Needless to say he is in shock. At the end of the day he finds himself falling back into the labyrinth from whence he had awakened that morning.Through the remaining years of his life (?) time he will occasionally awaken on his birthday to find that years have passed, he is much older and his life is irrevocably changed; not for the better. For with each awakening he learns that during the span of time between, he has lived a life that has had a great negative effect on his family and friends. He comes to realize that he is not a good man. His family & friends have come to fear him. So he attempts to find a way to protect them from himself.The concept of this book is HUGE! I found it to be fascinating and think that in the hands of a more experienced writer, Still With Me could have been an absolutely brilliant book. As it is I found it to be very good and the reading of it has left me with much to ponder. I do recommend it to a certain breed of reader but definitely not for all.
  • (4/5)
    I started to read this book in French a while ago, unfortunately my French is just not good enough (even with a dictionary by my side).

    Honestly, yes, it was a bit hard following what was going on, but it's not rocket science. Things can get lost in translation, but I think Summer Robinson did a wonderful job.
    The story is pretty simple, Jeremy, turning twenty, hopelessly in love with Victoria, commits suicide on his birthday after she rejects him. Then, a couple of times over the years, he wakes up the morning of his birthdays to find that his life has moved on, he got the girl, they had a family, he lost the girl, and to his horror, he is a horrible, horrible man.

    I was captivated by this story, it's brilliant, actually. The villain in this book is Jeremy himself. How do you stop someone you've never met, can't meet because you can't both be there at the same time? And the remnants of his horrible doings are all around you? That's what makes it so good, Jeremy is trying to outsmart his other self.
    I did shed a tear or two during the final chapters. I don't know, it was so sad that he never got to live this life that he was obviously destined to live.

    I don't know what I thought the ending would be when I started this. I'd like to think he gets to start all over again.

    I sure didn't expect a religious preaching, although I saw it coming somewhere throughout the book. To each their own, I guess. I love it when authors manage to weave religion into a story without being preachy, but this is actually so preachy that I felt kind of insulted. I'm deciding whether or not just to ignore the whole religious aspect, because the rest of the story was magnificent.
  • (2/5)
    This novel was written by the author after his best friend committed suicide. It begins with the (attempted? completed?) suicide, on his birthday, of a young Jeremy, who has been spurned by Victoria, the woman he loves. Instead of dying, however, Jeremy wakes on his birthday a year later to find that he and Victoria are happily in love; however, he has no memory of anything since his suicide attempt.With each chapter, Jeremy wakes on another birthday, to find his life irrevocably altered each time. He feels more and more out of control as his life deteriorates, unable to figure out what is happening as his reprehensible, but unremembered, behavior between birthdays destroys his entire life. He struggles to understand whether he is really alive or in hell.The novel is, of course, an exploration of the aftermath of a suicide. The tone of the novel suggests that suicide is a selfish choice that is made without thought to others. In the punitive aftermath of Jeremy’s choice, one can’t help but wonder whether the novel is the author’s way of working through some of his anger at his best friend. Which would be completely understandable, but it limits the story. Rather than exploring the multifaceted and complex issues around suicide, it feels boiled down too simply to a selfish, impulsive choice that occurs because the person doesn’t think about those around them. Of course, suicide is not that simple.Another unfortunate result of this tone is that Jeremy comes across as a rather unsympathetic character. We get glimpses of the “real Jeremy” on his birthday as each chapter begins, and these are presented in stark contrast to the everyday Jeremy who apparently hurts everyone around him. Because Jeremy himself is terribly confused about his identity, the reader never really gets a sense of who he is, making it incredibly difficult to invest in the ultimate outcome of his story. The surrounding characters, too, seem rather incidental and are never really developed. The writing itself is quite good, and deftly captures Jeremy’s sense of increasingly confused desperation; however, it was ultimately not enough to make me ever feel connected to the story, which ended on a rather ambiguous and unsatisfying note.