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When China Rules the World: The End of the Western World and the Birth of a New Global Order

When China Rules the World: The End of the Western World and the Birth of a New Global Order

Written by Martin Jacques

Narrated by Scott Peterson


When China Rules the World: The End of the Western World and the Birth of a New Global Order

Written by Martin Jacques

Narrated by Scott Peterson

ratings:
3/5 (60 ratings)
Length:
16 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Nov 23, 2009
ISBN:
9781596594944
Format:
Audiobook

Description

HOW CHINA'S ASCENDANCE AS AN ECONOMIC SUPERPOWER WILL ALTER THE CULTURAL, POLITICAL, SOCIAL, AND ETHNIC BALANCE OF GLOBAL POWER IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY, UNSEATING THE WEST AND IN THE PROCESS CREATING A WHOLE NEW WORLD According to even the most conservative estimates, China will overtake the United States as the world's largest economy by 2027 and will ascend to the position of world economic leader by 2050. But the full repercussions of China's ascendancy-for itself and the rest of the globe-have been surprisingly little explained or understood. In this far-reaching and original investigation, Martin Jacques offers provocative answers to some of the most pressing questions about China's growing place on the world stage. Martin Jacques reveals, by elaborating on three historical truths, how China will seek to shape the world in its own image. The Chinese have a rich and long history as a civilization-state. Under the tributary system, outlying states paid tribute to the Middle Kingdom. Ninety-four percent of the population still believes they are one race-"Han Chinese." The strong sense of superiority rooted in China's history promises to resurface in twenty-first century China and in the process strengthen and further unify the country. A culturally self-confident Asian giant with a billion-plus population, China will likely resist globalization as we know it. This exceptionalism will have powerful ramifications for the rest of the world and the United States in particular. As China is already emerging as the new center of the East Asian economy, the mantle of economic and, therefore, cultural relevance will in our lifetimes begin to pass from Manhattan and Paris to cities like Beijing and Shanghai. It is the American relationship with and attitude toward China, Jacques argues, that will determine whether the twenty-first century will be relatively peaceful or fraught with tension, instability, and danger. When China Rules the World is the first book to fully conceive of and explain the upheaval that China's ascendance will cause and the realigned global power structure it will create.
Publisher:
Released:
Nov 23, 2009
ISBN:
9781596594944
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Martin Jacques, a political journalist and scholar, is the coeditor and coauthor of The Forward March or Labour Halted?, The Politics of Thatcherism, and New Times. He lives in London.



Reviews

What people think about When China Rules the World

3.1
60 ratings / 5 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (1/5)
    This is uncritical of China to the point of sycophancy. It even goes as far as treating Chinese medicine as a genuine science and not a Chinese version of homeopathy that it is. I can only assume this book is sponsored by the communist party. I hope everyone involved in making this is suitably embarrassed.
  • (3/5)
    A robust qualitative and quantitative account of China's rise to power in the closing decades of the 20th and beginning decades of the 21st centuries. When China Rules the World certainly makes its case with more than enough supporting data.

    Much of the informative qualitative aspects are traced through a high-level view of Chinese history, revealing the longevity of the Chinese culture, little-known innovative aspects of the earliest Chinese rulers, inventors and explorers, as well as overviews of Chinese cultural behaviors, political philosophies, social sentiments and its notable lack of outward imperial expansion. Indeed, China refers to the latter half of the 19th through the 20th as its "century of humiliation" while, by the beginning of the 21st century it finds itself leading the economic world order admist the faltering Western institutions that have dominated it for the last century and a half.

    Unsurprisingly, most of Jacques' argument stems from the quantitative analysis of Chinese economic performance, relative to the global economic order and, if the intuition wasn't already there for you, the rise of Chinese influence around the world is convincingly an incontrovertible reality. The argument is made through countless references (contained within roughly 100 pages of notes and bibliography) and a few anecdotes from Jacques himself (observed through his professor fellowships held at several Chinese universities through the early aughts and aught-teens).

    While the last update was over 7 years ago, there's little that seems to have changed in the general trend that Jacques has illustrated throughout this book. The only shortcoming I had with it, and this may merit a separate text altogether, is the lack of detail on domestic political function, structure and organization. While there was a small subsection or two on domestic politics, very little of it made any mention to particulars and instead fell to the more qualitative anecdotes and inferences made by Jacques. Whether this was due to far less rigidity in domestic Chinese political protocol (as compared with its Western counterparts) or that it was simply not what Jacques was attempting to explain was not easily discerned within the text.

    Regardless of this, Jacques has put together a comprehensive and quality argument for why China will rule the world. For anyone interested in foreign policy, global finance, economic power and even Chinese politics, Chinese culture and its history in terms of Western notions and concepts, I would recommend this book for reading, perusal, or reference.
  • (3/5)
    A very interesting premise. The book is divided into two parts, of varying quality - about the fall of the western world, and the rise of the Chinese. Covers both topics from a historical, economic, and political perspective.

    Some of the conclusion are very interesting (e.g. China will modernize in its own way with a relatively authoritarian government, and not necessarily follow the Western method of industrialization which also involves greater social liberties), but some of the chapters and assumptions are so repetitive and unnecessary as to be useless. Chinese people enjoy Chinese food? Well, do go on.

    In summary, the book has some interesting ideas, but they are mired in repetitions and some incredibly obvious remarks. I suggest one read it, but with a critical eye.
  • (4/5)
    This is an intentionally opinionated history of the Supreme Court of the United States of America.

    Burns brings his considerable historical knowledge and literary skill to bear on what has sometimes been the most respected institution in American government, and at other times derided as partisan and backward-looking. As he traces its development from the words in the Constitution and the brilliant, energetic, ambitious, and forward-thinking John Marshall, through to today's Roberts Court, it becomes clear that Burns considers the latter view to be correct for most of the Court's history.

    Certain bad Court decisions, such as Dred Scott, are well known, and I have a strong interest in American history. Despite that, I found much of the surprisingly sordid history of Court decisions turning the meaning even of the 14th and 15th Amendments on their heads, inventing a distinction between state and national citizenship, and applying "due process" and other procedural and substantive rights almost entirely to property and the regulation of economic activity, and reducing civil rights of individuals to almost nothing, to be a revelation.

    The interplay between politics and the Court, and the persistent conservatism of the Court over decades and generations, even in the face of true national crises like the Great Depression, is disturbing and disheartening. When he reaches the Warren Court, Burns is in some respects downright gleeful, but also aware that it is the flip side of the intransigent Court that opposed Franklin Roosevelt's efforts to create legislation and take action that would alleviate and reverse the Great Depression. In both eras, the personalities and political views of the Justices, rather than the myth of dispassionate, high-minded jurisprudence,

    As we proceed forward from the Warren Court to the current Roberts Court, once again a conservative Court with an easy willingness to strike down as "unconstitutional" progressive legislation, Burns begins to lay out the polemical purpose of this book. He argues that the power of the Court to strike down legislation and to be the final arbiter of Constitutionality in all things, is unfounded in the Constitution or any supporting evidence of the intentions of the Founders, and that it has done more harm than good, threatening the foundations of democracy. His proposed solutions will sound radical to many, and certainly don't entirely agree with him myself. Nevertheless, even as a polemicist, Burns remains calm, rational, clear, and thoughtful, and this is an argument well worth reading and considering.

    Recommended.

    I borrowed this book from the library.
  • (3/5)
    Well-presented but somewhat dated by 2011.