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You Belong to Me: And Other True Cases

You Belong to Me: And Other True Cases

Written by Ann Rule

Narrated by Laural Merlington


You Belong to Me: And Other True Cases

Written by Ann Rule

Narrated by Laural Merlington

ratings:
4/5 (11 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Released:
Mar 19, 2013
ISBN:
9781469285269
Format:
Audiobook

Description

A former Seattle policewoman, Ann Rule has extensive experience of violent crime and brings this knowledge to bear in this collection of fascinating case studies. You Belong to Me focuses on one of Florida's most shocking criminals-Tim Harris, the poster-perfect "All-American" State Trooper who hid bizarre and fatal fantasies behind his badge of authority.

Bearing the stamp of classic Ann Rule that makes her books so extraordinary, this and other cases from her personal files prove once again her undisputed status as the Queen of True Crime.

Released:
Mar 19, 2013
ISBN:
9781469285269
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Ann Rule wrote thirty-five New York Times bestsellers, all of them still in print. Her first bestseller was The Stranger Beside Me, about her personal relationship with infamous serial killer Ted Bundy. A former Seattle police officer, she used her firsthand expertise in all her books. For more than three decades, she was a powerful advocate for victims of violent crime. She lived near Seattle and died in 2015.


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Reviews

What people think about You Belong to Me

4.0
11 ratings / 1 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I have been an Ann Rule fan since I read "The Stranger Beside Me" and started side-eyeing every random person I saw. I got this one for $0.99 on the Kindle, so I figured it was worth a read. This is only the second collection of case files I have read of Rule's - I have largely stuck with her books that are dedicated to a single case. I did like this book overall. The main case in the book (the story of the murder of Lorraine Hendricks in Florida) was interesting, and, as always in the case of Ann Rule books, a good reminder to be wary of people who are too charming and who exhibit controlling behavior. This first section was a fast read. As is normal for Rule, she gives, to the extent possible, an overview of the lives of the major players - the criminal, his long-suffering wife, the victim, and the detectives who handled the case. The author does a good job of making these sections readable, using foreshadowing where applicable, and giving us a real sense of how everyone's lives were affected. The last part (showing empathy and compassion for the victims and their families) is where I think Ann Rule rises above the pack of authors in this sometimes crappy true crime genre. She is respectful of the victims and less likely to go into extremely gruesome detail. The only reason I am giving this four stars is because the other cases were a little bit lacking. ***Spoiler alert*** One case ended up not being a criminal case at all. However, the author still did a good job, in all the cases in this book, of letting the readers get to know the people who were affected by the cases. One note: Since the first criminal we encounter in this book (Tim Harris, the criminal in the main case in the book) was a state trooper, several other reviewers have said that Ann Rule bent over backwards (to the book's detriment) to paint Tim Harris as a complete aberration in the criminal justice field. Rule herself was a policewoman at one point and does make an effort to explain the hardships faced by police officers and government prosecutors. But I did not feel as though she "bent over backward" to show that Tim Harris was an outlier. Rather, she explained how he used his power to trap his victim. I did not get the impression that she was trying too hard to convince the readers that, aside from this isolated case, the police can never be involved in criminal activity. She did comment that Harris made the profession look bad, but I don't think that's an unreasonable assertion.

    1 person found this helpful