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Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet


Romeo and Juliet

ratings:
4/5 (76 ratings)
Length:
2 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Dec 27, 2003
ISBN:
9780060743253
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as ebookEbook

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Description

A pair of star-cross'd lovers. –Prologue

Romeo and Juliet

was Shakespeare's first great tragedy, a richly lyrical love story that has long been one of the author's most popular plays for performer and audience alike. Romeo and Juliet is a simple but dramatic cautionary tale about the blindness that both love and hate can engender.

As performed by Claire Bloom and Albert Finney, this lively production captures the youthful exuberance and poetic passion that characterize all of Shakespeare's early work and makes Romeo and Juliet in particular the greatest romantic creation in English Literature.

This unabridged, full-cast recording is a wonderful way to experience and listen to Shakespeare out-loud.

A HarperAudio production.

Publisher:
Released:
Dec 27, 2003
ISBN:
9780060743253
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

James Anthony is an award-winning author, yet comes from a distinctly non-literary background. A former tech-entrepreneur, he followed his passion for poetry by 'translating' all 154 of Shakespeare's sonnets, published by Penguin Random House in 2018. James writes across many genres, including travel, screenplays, and fiction, but retains an enduring love of the poetics of Shakespeare's iambic pentameter. After spending many years in the US, James now lives in his native London with his beloved wife Versha. For more information on James's writing, visit www.james-anthony.com



Reviews

What people think about Romeo and Juliet

3.9
76 ratings / 80 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    This review is for the Frankly Annotated First Folio Edition, with annotations by Demitra Papadinis.The layout of the book is fantastic, making it easy to keep your place in the play when checking on the notes. The notes themselves are fantastic, going in depth and not leaving out the dirty jokes. A thoroughly enjoyable and educational edition!
  • (2/5)
    Bad audio quality when the actors shout or speak loud.
  • (5/5)
    Teenage Proclivity for Conjugation: "Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare, J.A. Bryant Jr. Published 1998.

    Upon each re-reading I always wonder why Shakespeare does not reveal the reason that the families hate each other. We are told that the households are alike in dignity (social status). We are even provided with a "spoiler alert" when we learn that the "star crossed lovers" will commit suicide, resulting in a halt to the feuding between the two families. In addition, we receive the clue that the feud has gone on for a long time (ancient grudge) However, the omission of the reason for the feud leaves us wondering and imagining a variety of scenarios--just as Shakespeare must have intended. I think it is important for an author to leave a mystery for the reader to explore. In Star Wars there was a sense of mystery about the Force, what was it. Are there any reasons needed, ever? The humankind's history is filled with feuds which are completely pointless... "Ancient grudge", servants' street fight -- and general desire to feel better than someone else. Isn't this very pointlessness that Shakespeare intended the viewers to see?

    The rest of this review can be read elsewhere.
  • (4/5)
    Note: this is only four stars compared to other Shakespeare. Romeo and Juliet is not the best play he ever wrote, but it is far and away better than almost anything else in the English language.
  • (4/5)
    The play, set in Verona, begins with a street brawl between Montagues and Capulets who are sworn enemies. The Prince of Verona intervenes and declares that further breach of the peace will be punishable by death. Later, Count Paris talks to Capulet about marrying his daughter, but Capulet is wary of the request because Juliet is only thirteen. Capulet asks Paris to wait another two years and invites him to attend a planned Capulet ball. Lady Capulet and Juliet's nurse try to persuade Juliet to accept Paris's courtship.

    Meanwhile, Benvolio talks with his cousin Romeo, Lord Montague's son, about Romeo's recent depression. Benvolio discovers that it stems from unrequited infatuation for a girl named Rosaline, one of Capulet's nieces. Persuaded by Benvolio and Mercutio, Romeo attends the ball at the Capulet house. However, Romeo instead meets and falls in love with Juliet. After the ball, in what is now called the "balcony scene", Romeo sneaks into the Capulet courtyard and overhears Juliet on her balcony vowing her love to him in spite of her family's hatred of the Montagues. Romeo makes himself known to her and they agree to be married. With the help of Friar Laurence, who hopes to reconcile the two families through their children's union, they are secretly married the next day.

    Juliet's cousin Tybalt, incensed that Romeo had sneaked into the Capulet ball, challenges him to a duel. Romeo, now considering Tybalt his kinsman, refuses to fight. Mercutio is offended by Tybalt's insolence, as well as Romeo's "vile submission," and accepts the duel on Romeo's behalf. Mercutio is fatally wounded when Romeo attempts to break up the fight. Grief-stricken and wracked with guilt, Romeo confronts and slays Tybalt.

    Montague argues that Romeo has justly executed Tybalt for the murder of Mercutio. The Prince, now having lost a kinsman in the warring families' feud, exiles Romeo from Verona and declares that if Romeo returns, "that hour is his last." Romeo secretly spends the night in Juliet's chamber, where they consummate their marriage. Capulet, misinterpreting Juliet's grief, agrees to marry her to Count Paris and threatens to disown her when she refuses to become Paris's "joyful bride." When she then pleads for the marriage to be delayed, her mother rejects her.

    Juliet visits Friar Laurence for help, and he offers her a drug that will put her into a death-like coma for "two and forty hours." The Friar promises to send a messenger to inform Romeo of the plan, so that he can rejoin her when she awakens. On the night before the wedding, she takes the drug and, when discovered apparently dead, she is laid in the family crypt.

    The messenger, however, does not reach Romeo and, instead, he learns of Juliet's apparent death from his servant Balthasar. Heartbroken, Romeo buys poison from an apothecary and goes to the Capulet crypt. He encounters Paris who has come to mourn Juliet privately. Believing Romeo to be a vandal, Paris confronts him and, in the ensuing battle, Romeo kills Paris. Still believing Juliet to be dead, he drinks the poison. Juliet then awakens and, finding Romeo dead, stabs herself with his dagger. The feuding families and the Prince meet at the tomb to find all three dead. Friar Laurence recounts the story of the two "star-cross'd lovers". The families are reconciled by their children's deaths and agree to end their violent feud. The play ends with the Prince's elegy for the lovers: "For never was a story of more woe / Than this of Juliet and her Romeo."
  • (2/5)
    READ IN ENGLISH

    I suppose this is an absolute must-read for everyone who has ever been to high school. I read it in my fifth year and actually I really couldn't understand what gave this story it's marvelous reputation.

    May Contain Some Spoilers!

    Maybe it was more normal in those days, as I'm not the slightest a professor when it comes to both English Literature/Plays and English History, but it seems at least a bit weird, to run away and kill yourself over someone you've only just met and everything. Yes, there is of course a lot of drama in it, and presumably it is better to see it on stage than to read it, but I had expected more from this story, as it is so extremely famous!