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Calypso

Calypso

Written by Ed McBain

Narrated by Dick Hill


Calypso

Written by Ed McBain

Narrated by Dick Hill

ratings:
3/5 (2 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Released:
Oct 2, 2012
ISBN:
9781455873654
Format:
Audiobook

Description

When a calypso singer and a prostitute are murdered with the same gun, Detectives Carella and Meyer descend into the murky world of sex and sadism to find a killer on the loose.

"Imagine your favorite Law & Order cast solving fresh mysteries into infinity, with no re-runs, and you have some sense of McBain's grand, ongoing accomplishment." -Entertainment Weekly

"McBain forces us to think twice about every character we meet…even those we thought we already knew." -New York Times Book Review

Released:
Oct 2, 2012
ISBN:
9781455873654
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Ed McBain, a recipient of the Mystery Writers of America's coveted Grand Master Award, was also the first American to receive the Diamond Dagger, the British Crime Writers Association's highest award. His books have sold more than one hundred million copies, ranging from the more than fifty titles in the 87th Precinct series (including the Edgar Award–nominated Money, Money, Money) to the bestselling novels written under his own name, Evan Hunter—including The Blackboard Jungle (now in a fiftieth anniversary edition from Pocket Books) and Criminal Conversation. Fiddlers, his final 87th Precinct novel, was recently published in hardcover. Writing as both Ed McBain and Evan Hunter, he broke new ground with Candyland, a novel in two parts. He also wrote the screenplay for Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds. He died in 2005. Visit EdMcBain.com.

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Reviews

What people think about Calypso

3.0
2 ratings / 2 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (2/5)
    Perhaps the weakest 87th Precinct detective novel I've yet encountered. Disappointing . . . yet still worth reading.
  • (4/5)
    Bones began remembering. As far as Meyer could tell, he was remembering in great detail and with a maximum of accuracy. It was not until several hours later - when Meyer compared notes with Carella on the telephone - that he recognized Bones' story was not without its inconsistencies. In fact, there were only two congruent points between the story Barragan had told Carella and the one Bones told Meyer; both men agreed that George C. Chadderton was an egotistical prick, and both men agreed that is was raining on the night Santo Chadderton disappeared. As for the rest . . .To start with I wasn't sure that I had read this book before, but when I began to suspect what the police would find in the house at the end, I knew that I had. After all, who could forget an ending like that?