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Pawleys Island: A Lowcountry Tale

Pawleys Island: A Lowcountry Tale


Pawleys Island: A Lowcountry Tale

ratings:
4.5/5 (23 ratings)
Length:
10 hours
Released:
May 3, 2005
ISBN:
9781597371797
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Of the many barrier islands that pepper the coast of South Carolina's Lowcountry, Pawleys Island, the "arrogantly shabby" family playground for generations, might be the most mysterious and charming of them all. It is here and in the surrounding area that Dorothea Benton Frank has placed her latest Lowcountry tale, Pawleys Island.

Meet Huey Valentine, the owner of Gallery Valentine, catering to interior decorators and, heaven save us, tourists. Huey resides on his family plantation on the shores of the Waccamaw River, where he cares for his mother, Miss Olivia, a wise and irresistible octogenarian. And meet Huey's great friend Abigail Thurmond, retired attorney from Columbia, who has laid claim to her family's home on Pawleys Island. Huey and Abigail are complacent in their fat and sassy lives until the stormy advent of the artist Rebecca Simms.

Rebecca has been catapulted from her home, her marriage, and her children. She has escaped to Pawleys Island to hide herself from herself. But after Miss Olivia pries Rebecca's secrets from her, Huey and especially Abigail are challenged to reenter life outside the dream state their idyllic geography evokes. They will see that Rebecca has her day in court, but they never expect to provoke a national forum for discussion.

With characteristic humor and a full cast of eccentric and wonderfully lovable characters, Dorothea Benton Frank brings us her most honest and entertaining story to date. People have secrets they never want anyone to know. People have pasts they would prefer be left out of conversation. In Frank's nimble hands, it all comes spilling out to be examined and reconciled.
Released:
May 3, 2005
ISBN:
9781597371797
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

New York Times bestseller Dorothea Benton Frank was born and raised on Sullivans Island, South Carolina. Until her passing in 2019, Dorothea and her husband split their time between New Jersey and South Carolina. A contemporary voice of the South, Dorothea Benton Frank was beloved by fans and friends alike since her debut novel Sullivans Island. Readers from coast to coast fell for the quick wit and the signature humor that permeated her many bestselling novels.

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Reviews

What people think about Pawleys Island

4.3
23 ratings / 12 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Another story where a woman perseveres through a difficult time and comes out happy.
  • (4/5)
    Pawleys Island, on the most basic level, is a feel good story about how relationships shape our lives. Rebecca is an aspiring artist adrift after an abusive husband turns her children against her and sends her packing. She comes to Pawleys Island to regroup. Once there she meets 3 people who will help change her life and give her the courage to fight for her children.
  • (5/5)
    Pawleys island. Has been 20+ years since I’ve been there! Has me hankering to return. Real down to earth Southern women! Great story!
  • (5/5)
    I enjoy her books about the low country... it was a quick read after a couple of dark reads.
  • (4/5)
    Wonderful! Dorothea is a terrific story teller. I just recently relocated to the "Lowcountry" from Northern Virginia and was introduced to her books. No matter where you live, her stories are a must read. I am on a quest to read them all.
  • (3/5)
    I think of Dorothea Benton Frank as the little sister of Anne Rivers Siddons and Pat Conroy, my two favorite SC low country writers. Frank's books are more chick lit and less emotional baggage, more beach read and less "serious literature." Still, her stories usually keep me entertained. She has a feel for the dialogue and dialect of the South, and spins comfortable tales with happy endings.In Pawleys Island we meet "matrimonial lawyer" Abigail Thurmond, who has given up her law practice and moved back to her childhood home on Pawleys Island to deal with the grief of losing her son and husband in a short period of time. Her best friend is Huey Valentine, a gay man who runs the local art gallery. Both Huey and Abigail come from money, inherited money, and earn plenty of money, and between them they don't even have a goldfish to demand that they spend their money on anything but themselves.Along comes Rebecca Simms, who has escaped to Pawleys Island after losing her home and children to her cad of a husband. Abigail and Huey fly to the rescue. Huey gives Rebecca a job and Abigail swings back into attorney mode to represent Rebecca pro bono and give the scallywag of a husband the licking he deserves.There is little drama in the story. No surprise skeletons in Rebecca's closet. No heinously unjust court ruling. Just the story of how the friends rally around Rebecca and set her world right.I don't think I was in the mood to read about people who never have to worry about money. Even Rebecca, who had been tossed out of her own home, ends up with a fat bank account. I know wealthy people can have heartache and troubles too, but if you took Rebecca's plight and added the likely more realistic plot point of having no money and no fairy godmother of a lawyer, it would be a very different story.This one was readable and the characters were likeable, but there was no depth to character or plot. Nice weekend beach read but not Frank's best and certainly not on par with even Siddons's worst.
  • (4/5)
    Another wonderful lowcountry read by Frank. I love her characters, and especially revel in her descriptions of the oceanside life.
  • (3/5)
    The southern belles offer you laughs in the Low Country. Rebecca is down and out and leaves Charleston after her husband has taken her two kids and her life. She lands at a local art gallery in Pawley’s island to sell some of her work where she meets Huey which hires her to work at the art gallery and the nosey Abigail (retired attorney), steps in to help the underdog under covering mischief to help Rebecca. A light humorous read..
  • (3/5)
    (16 Aug 2011)Sprung upon in a charity shop because I have read another of her South Carolina novels, but a “meh” read. Two old friends on an island have their quiet lives interrupted by the new girl in town, fleeing from an unpleasant husband and her uncaring children. Will Abigail dust off her law qualifications and come to the rescue? We are meant to identify with the characters early on and root for them, but I couldn’t really involve myself with them. Frank seems to love her characters a bit too much and the divorce story just wasn’t that hugely interesting to me. Good atmospheric scenery though.
  • (4/5)
    Another great book by Frank. I was sure I would love this book just like the others and I was right. Huey and Abigail are a hoot and we can not leave out Miss Olivia and Byron they all make the book so great. I love the way author writes these stories everyone can relate to the story at some point.
  • (3/5)
    rebecca is thrown from her home by her abusive husband after he turns the 2 children against her. She ends up on this island with Huey, a rich art person, shows her artwork, gains his love and his rich mothers. They find out how wronged she has been and Abigail the lawyer takes Nat to court. Charlene is the side-show with all the new body parts. The court room scene is a scream of fun.
  • (5/5)
    Really good book and want to read others by this author