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Eon: Dragoneye Reborn

Eon: Dragoneye Reborn

Written by Alison Goodman

Narrated by Nancy Wu


Eon: Dragoneye Reborn

Written by Alison Goodman

Narrated by Nancy Wu

ratings:
4/5 (109 ratings)
Length:
14 hours
Released:
Dec 26, 2008
ISBN:
9781423379591
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Twelve-year-old Eon has been in training for years. His intensive study of Dragon Magic, based on East Asian astrology, involves two kinds of skills: sword-work and magical aptitude. He and his master hope that he will be chosen as a Dragoneye -- an apprentice to one of the twelve energy dragons of good fortune.

But Eon has a dangerous secret. He is actually Eona, a sixteen-year-old girl who has been masquerading as a boy for the chance to become a Dragoneye. Females are forbidden to use Dragon Magic; if anyone discovers she has been hiding in plain sight, her death is assured. When Eon's secret threatens to come to light, she and her allies are plunged into grave danger and a deadly struggle for the Imperial throne.

Eon must find the strength and inner power to battle those who want to take her magic...and her life.

Released:
Dec 26, 2008
ISBN:
9781423379591
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Alison Goodman is the author of the international bestselling and award-winning Eon/Eona duology and the Lady Helen series, as well as the acclaimed Singing the Dogstar Blues and the adult thriller A New Kind of Death (originally titled Killing the Rabbit). Alison lives in Melbourne, Australia, with her husband, Ron, and their adorable Australian Terrier mix, Buckley.  Visit her website at www.darkdaysclub.com



Reviews

What people think about Eon

4.0
109 ratings / 88 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Eon: Dragoneye Reborn is certainly unlike any book I've ever read and I'm at a loss at how to go about reviewing it. First of all I didn't have any expectations of how I would receive it but has it turns out I really enjoyed it. One of the things I really liked about it was the Chinese and Japanese influences in the story. I've always been interested in the Chinese Zodiac Animal signs. And this is basically the main angle of the book, young male contestants enter a yearly competition to become the Daragoneye Apprentice for the upcoming Animal sign.

    Eon was a candidate for his Master Heuris Brannon, who put all his eggs in one basket hoping Eon would be chosen as the Dragoneye, and help him reclaim his position as a Lord and get in a position to hinder the corruption in the counsel trying to dethrone the emperor. But you see the thing about Eon is, he's not male and is older than twelve, the age of all dragoneye contestants. I guess being poor and laboring in the salt farm most of her life gave Eon a small frame. I liked Eon's strength on how she handled and accepted the burden of all her masters hopes that was put on her, even though continually living her life as a boy did cause her some confusion. Soon Eon would realize more than her master's hope would be on her shoulders.

    There are so many elements to this story that made it very interesting and enjoyable. The different types of characters in the story for example, the Eunuchs, and the Contraires especially were an interesting facet. Eunuchs should be self-explanatory but the Contraires are said to have two souls, one male and one female. In the end for me, this was the epic story of Eon's journey to finding his or herself.
  • (4/5)
    My first comment is that I am really looking forward to reading Book Two - Eona. It feels like it took a long, long time for Eon to face up to her secret. In fact, this book is a perfect example of dramatic tension - every time I thought I saw a resolution coming, another chapter would keep me guessing. Made it very hard to decide where to stop reading for the night!
    This is classy fantasy, well-grounded in a thoroughly believable and consistent oriental world. With dragons! What could be better!
    If you love fantasy, conflicted protagonists who have to fight their way into their own shape and power, brilliant world-building, flawless dialogue and DRAGONS, then the Eon series is for you.
  • (2/5)
    I wish I could give this two and a half stars, because I really did enjoy great swathes of the story. The writing is solid, the characters are real and flawed and jump to incorrect conclusions and make mistakes, and the story really is one helluva ride.

    I had a difficult time getting swallowed by the story, though. I'm still not sure why, though if I was to hazard a guess I'd say it had to do with the world building. It wasn't totally smooth, and there wasn't a whole lot the reader could infer intuitively. The foundation of Eon's world starts to crumble as he learns things aren't as everyone in the empire assumed they were--which is all well and good, but it happens before the reader has a clear enough view of what those foundations consist of.

    HOWEVER: it is a good book. Please don't mistake two stars as a reason to not read this book or its sequel Eona. If you enjoy YA epic fantasy, you will undoubtedly enjoy Eon more than I did. It just wasn't for me.
  • (4/5)
    This was a great read! I really enjoyed the story, the world, the characters and everything - except that part where Eona got really annoying. The world was so well developed and had such a rich culture and setting. I loved how it was described and the way it was unraveled for us. I really enjoyed the characters and how they all played their part in the story. Eona's character development was great and well fleshed out, although throughout part of the book her lack of confidence was quite frustrating - yet believable because of the society she lived in and the circumstances. A really great read! Cannot wait to dig into the next one! :)
  • (3/5)
    Eon: Dragoneye Reborn is a refreshingly non-western culture fantasy with plenty of action and intrigue. The main character and narrator, Eon, provides an accessible voice for readers while still being fully a part of the Empire of the Celestial Dragons.[return]
    [return]I did find myself wanting to shake Eon for stupidity on a couple of occasions, mostly when I had managed to piece something together before Eon did.
  • (4/5)
    Eon is the first of two books about Eon who is supposed to be a 12 year old boy trying to be chosen as one of the 12 Dragoneyes- those who can see and control a dragon to prevent natural disasters and maintain peace etc. Eon is actually Eona, a 16 year old girl who was working at a salt farm when her master found her and decided to disguise her as a boy and train her to be one of the boys vying for the position as the next Rat Dragoneye. Women are not allowed to have anything to do with the dragons (or much else for that matter) and if anyone finds out she is female she will be put to death, alongside her master. The gamble pays off when she is chosen, however there's more going on than she realizes and soon she finds herself immersed in the politics of the empire and the Dragoneyes. I really enjoyed how this book focuses on the Eastern mythology of the zodiac and the empire. I don't read much in the way of eastern literature and I feel like these books are a nice gateway to get into that style of writing and storytelling. I enjoyed the politics at play as well as the dragons themselves. After reading the second book I have to say that I'd love to read a prequel and I think that would help flesh out some of the other dragons who aren't really mentioned. My biggest issue is that I found some characters to not be fleshed out enough. Eona has friends, but not really. She forms bonds with people, but they aren't concrete enough and I think the supporting cast suffers as a result. Dela and Ryko are fantastic but I found myself to know more about them. Even Chart and the new Rat Dragon apprentice who she knows pretty well are not really described adequately. I don't feel like I really know them with the bare bones explanations, descriptions etc. What was there was great, but it wasn't enough. I also was kind of disappointed with how predictable the story could be at times. I could see where the story was leading long before Eona, and some plot points were a bit too predictable for me. Maybe it comes from reading too much fantasy, but I would have been happy with a huge plot twist or even a little one. Overall, this was an enjoyable story and I will probably reread it. If I saw another book from the same author I would pick it up.