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Eon: Dragoneye Reborn
Eon: Dragoneye Reborn
Eon: Dragoneye Reborn
Audiobook14 hours

Eon: Dragoneye Reborn

Written by Alison Goodman

Narrated by Nancy Wu

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

3/5

()

About this audiobook

Twelve-year-old Eon has been in training for years. His intensive study of Dragon Magic, based on East Asian astrology, involves two kinds of skills: sword-work and magical aptitude. He and his master hope that he will be chosen as a Dragoneye -- an apprentice to one of the twelve energy dragons of good fortune.

But Eon has a dangerous secret. He is actually Eona, a sixteen-year-old girl who has been masquerading as a boy for the chance to become a Dragoneye. Females are forbidden to use Dragon Magic; if anyone discovers she has been hiding in plain sight, her death is assured. When Eon's secret threatens to come to light, she and her allies are plunged into grave danger and a deadly struggle for the Imperial throne.

Eon must find the strength and inner power to battle those who want to take her magic...and her life.

LanguageEnglish
Release dateDec 26, 2008
ISBN9781423379591
Eon: Dragoneye Reborn
Author

Alison Goodman

Alison Goodman is the author of the international bestselling and award-winning Eon/Eona duology and the Lady Helen series, as well as the acclaimed Singing the Dogstar Blues and the adult thriller A New Kind of Death (originally titled Killing the Rabbit). Alison lives in Melbourne, Australia, with her husband, Ron, and their adorable Australian Terrier mix, Buckley.  Visit her website at www.darkdaysclub.com

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Reviews for Eon

Rating: 3.1744868035190614 out of 5 stars
3/5

682 ratings88 reviews

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  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Eon: Dragoneye Reborn is certainly unlike any book I've ever read and I'm at a loss at how to go about reviewing it. First of all I didn't have any expectations of how I would receive it but has it turns out I really enjoyed it. One of the things I really liked about it was the Chinese and Japanese influences in the story. I've always been interested in the Chinese Zodiac Animal signs. And this is basically the main angle of the book, young male contestants enter a yearly competition to become the Daragoneye Apprentice for the upcoming Animal sign.

    Eon was a candidate for his Master Heuris Brannon, who put all his eggs in one basket hoping Eon would be chosen as the Dragoneye, and help him reclaim his position as a Lord and get in a position to hinder the corruption in the counsel trying to dethrone the emperor. But you see the thing about Eon is, he's not male and is older than twelve, the age of all dragoneye contestants. I guess being poor and laboring in the salt farm most of her life gave Eon a small frame. I liked Eon's strength on how she handled and accepted the burden of all her masters hopes that was put on her, even though continually living her life as a boy did cause her some confusion. Soon Eon would realize more than her master's hope would be on her shoulders.

    There are so many elements to this story that made it very interesting and enjoyable. The different types of characters in the story for example, the Eunuchs, and the Contraires especially were an interesting facet. Eunuchs should be self-explanatory but the Contraires are said to have two souls, one male and one female. In the end for me, this was the epic story of Eon's journey to finding his or herself.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    My first comment is that I am really looking forward to reading Book Two - Eona. It feels like it took a long, long time for Eon to face up to her secret. In fact, this book is a perfect example of dramatic tension - every time I thought I saw a resolution coming, another chapter would keep me guessing. Made it very hard to decide where to stop reading for the night!
    This is classy fantasy, well-grounded in a thoroughly believable and consistent oriental world. With dragons! What could be better!
    If you love fantasy, conflicted protagonists who have to fight their way into their own shape and power, brilliant world-building, flawless dialogue and DRAGONS, then the Eon series is for you.
  • Rating: 2 out of 5 stars
    2/5
    I wish I could give this two and a half stars, because I really did enjoy great swathes of the story. The writing is solid, the characters are real and flawed and jump to incorrect conclusions and make mistakes, and the story really is one helluva ride.

    I had a difficult time getting swallowed by the story, though. I'm still not sure why, though if I was to hazard a guess I'd say it had to do with the world building. It wasn't totally smooth, and there wasn't a whole lot the reader could infer intuitively. The foundation of Eon's world starts to crumble as he learns things aren't as everyone in the empire assumed they were--which is all well and good, but it happens before the reader has a clear enough view of what those foundations consist of.

    HOWEVER: it is a good book. Please don't mistake two stars as a reason to not read this book or its sequel Eona. If you enjoy YA epic fantasy, you will undoubtedly enjoy Eon more than I did. It just wasn't for me.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    This was a great read! I really enjoyed the story, the world, the characters and everything - except that part where Eona got really annoying. The world was so well developed and had such a rich culture and setting. I loved how it was described and the way it was unraveled for us. I really enjoyed the characters and how they all played their part in the story. Eona's character development was great and well fleshed out, although throughout part of the book her lack of confidence was quite frustrating - yet believable because of the society she lived in and the circumstances. A really great read! Cannot wait to dig into the next one! :)
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    Eon: Dragoneye Reborn is a refreshingly non-western culture fantasy with plenty of action and intrigue. The main character and narrator, Eon, provides an accessible voice for readers while still being fully a part of the Empire of the Celestial Dragons.[return]
    [return]I did find myself wanting to shake Eon for stupidity on a couple of occasions, mostly when I had managed to piece something together before Eon did.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Eon is the first of two books about Eon who is supposed to be a 12 year old boy trying to be chosen as one of the 12 Dragoneyes- those who can see and control a dragon to prevent natural disasters and maintain peace etc. Eon is actually Eona, a 16 year old girl who was working at a salt farm when her master found her and decided to disguise her as a boy and train her to be one of the boys vying for the position as the next Rat Dragoneye. Women are not allowed to have anything to do with the dragons (or much else for that matter) and if anyone finds out she is female she will be put to death, alongside her master. The gamble pays off when she is chosen, however there's more going on than she realizes and soon she finds herself immersed in the politics of the empire and the Dragoneyes. I really enjoyed how this book focuses on the Eastern mythology of the zodiac and the empire. I don't read much in the way of eastern literature and I feel like these books are a nice gateway to get into that style of writing and storytelling. I enjoyed the politics at play as well as the dragons themselves. After reading the second book I have to say that I'd love to read a prequel and I think that would help flesh out some of the other dragons who aren't really mentioned. My biggest issue is that I found some characters to not be fleshed out enough. Eona has friends, but not really. She forms bonds with people, but they aren't concrete enough and I think the supporting cast suffers as a result. Dela and Ryko are fantastic but I found myself to know more about them. Even Chart and the new Rat Dragon apprentice who she knows pretty well are not really described adequately. I don't feel like I really know them with the bare bones explanations, descriptions etc. What was there was great, but it wasn't enough. I also was kind of disappointed with how predictable the story could be at times. I could see where the story was leading long before Eona, and some plot points were a bit too predictable for me. Maybe it comes from reading too much fantasy, but I would have been happy with a huge plot twist or even a little one. Overall, this was an enjoyable story and I will probably reread it. If I saw another book from the same author I would pick it up.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    this book was pretty good, though it had it awkward moments. at the beginning it was all ready talking about periods and it went into full detail of a totally wrong kiss!!! other than those two small points, the story was very good. it was a little slow and about 50 pages too long. i love the idea of all the different dragons though, even though two of them are pretty much the exact same color!!
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    Oh my god. Eon drags you in by tooth and nail and won't let go. Appearances aren't always what they seem. Just as the gifts that one has, receives or even gets may take time to master. Coming to terms with what happens to ones family (whether it's your blood family or one of your choosing) is part of ones life. Eon is the first in a duo of books. Talk about a bloody cliff hanger at the end of Eon.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    I enjoyed this set of books so much. It was a amazing book about a girl overcoming the oppression of her culture and rising above them all with grace and kindness while destroying evil!
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    Usually when it takes me over a week to finish a book it's because I didn't like it or found it very boring. Fortunately with Eon that wasn't the case and it took me so long to finish it simply because last week had me in a near constant state of exhaustion and I couldn't focus on reading for very long.

    Eon was such a good book! I absolutely love books with dragons and things based in Asian culture so I had high expectations for this book which isn't always a good thing but all of my expectations were either met or surpassed. This was EVERYTHING I've been wanting in a fantasy book for ages!

    My favorite things about this book

    The world building

    The character development

    Transgender people

    Disabled main character

    Mulan type main character

    Identity issues the main character develops

    The very subtle, barely there romance

    All of the Asian culture

    Things I didn't like:

    Eona's disability gets healed at the very end. We need more main characters who are super powerful AND disabled. Not people who are cured/healed the second they get super powerful

    This wasn't too big of an issue but I thought Eon transitioned into Eona a bit too seamlessly and quick in my opinion

    In other words this is an amazing book and anyone who likes fantasy should read it.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    It's a young adult book. Don't expect extreme moral complexity, but hop on for an atmospheric world, some "fuck yeah, feminism!" moments, and a compelling ensemble of heroes. Any story that, at its core, is a tale of a young woman learning how powerful she really is, has a good chance of winning me over.

    This is the only story about a woman masquerading as a man that actually addresses the dysphoria she might feel, the profound discomfort caused by living as a person she isn't. It's made all the more powerful by her mentor and friend Lady Dila, who is a trans woman and communicates the message that being a woman isn't necessarily about the body, but about a strong internal feeling of womanhood.

    My major reservations are that the villain is a bit too cartoonish, and the Throwing Off the Disability trope at the end made me go "Nooooo!" It was such a good representation of disability until then, why did you have to take it away from me?
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    Okay, so I can't describe just how much I loved this book. I'm going to read it at least twice more so I can go back and pick up some of the amazing details to the story that I missed. I couldn't put it down!
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    The premise: ganked from Goodreads: Eon has been studying the ancient art of Dragon Magic for four years, hoping he'll be able to apprentice to one of the twelve energy dragons of good fortune. But he also has a dark secret. He is actually Eona, a sixteen-year-old girl who has been living a dangerous lie for the chance to become a Dragon-eye, the human link to an energy dragon's power. It is forbidden for females to practice the Dragon Magic and, if discovered, Eon faces a terrible death. After a dazzling sword ceremony, Eon's affinity with the twelve dragons catapults him into the treacherous world of the Imperial court, where he makes a powerful enemy, Lord Ido. As tension builds and Eon's desperate lie comes to light, readers won't be able to stop turning the pages…My Rating: Good ReadDespite the length, Eon is a fast, engaging read that will pepper the reader with all kinds of questions about the nature of feminism, gender, and even disability. While I can't promise all of those answers will be satisfying, they work well to create a story that takes a common fantasy trope and turns it into an utterly important and necessary plot point. Goodman does a fantastic job with the narrative voice, which is worth noting because I suspect most writers would have trouble with a voice of a girl pretending to be a boy. I often forgot that Eon was female, and yet I never forgot, if that makes sense, and that's a tribute to Goodman's skill. The book certainly has me curious to see how the story wraps up in Eona, and the world-building is quite compelling and unique to readers who are used to the standard medieval fantasy fare. I can't speak to age group recommendations, because I don't have a child, but I do have nieces: I'm not sure I could recommend this to my nine-year-old niece, who has particularly religious parents who may be weirded out by some of the book's deeper questions and themes, but I do have a fourteen-year-old niece who might just be the right age for this. So it's definitely worth recommending to young teens in addition to adult fans of fantasy.Spoilers, yay or nay?: Yay. As with all book club selections, there will be spoilers, so if you're trying to avoid them, please do not read the full review. However, if you're all caught up, I'd love to hear your thoughts. The full review may be found at my blog, and you can go to the review directly by clicking the link below. As always, comments and discussion are most welcome.REVIEW: Alison Goodman's EONHappy Reading!
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    I’ve been looking forward to reading this book ever since I slated it for the Australian Women Writers Reading Challenge. I was finally able to get to it, and it did not disappoint! Eon has a unique background: rooted in Chinese and Japanese culture and transformed into something both familiar and alien at the same time. The dragons are a wonderful addition to the story, and I loved how the author used them.The story is based on the age old tale of a woman having to work hard to make it in a man’s world, but it is handed intelligently and there is a wonderful mystery surrounding the issue. In Eon’s world, it is thought that women are unworthy of the powers of a Dragoneye, and that they are too soft and unpractical to really be good at anything except sewing and gossiping. While I hated the prejudice against women, I found Eon’s struggles all the more griping as she (he?) tried to hide her deadly secret. The characters make Eon a delight to read, with their depth and realistic attitudes. The villains were properly terrifying in their psychotic nature, and the heroes were endearing. I found Lord Ido interesting but repulsive at the same time. His ambition scared me and his philosophies were so outrageous that I was genuinely mystified by them for a while. Eon’s struggles to understand her own nature were very well written and I sympathised with her a lot.Eon is a great book, which I enjoyed reading immensely. A word of warning, you really want to have access to the sequel, Eona, when you are reading this book, because I think it would be very difficult to wait to find out what happens! Read more of my reviews here.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Eon, a young woman disguised as a twelve-year-old boy, struggles to make her way through the intrigue-laden Imperial Court, where she must politick with the Dragoneyes and their allies even as she works to master her own inconsistent magical powers.I found this a remarkably readable book. It was easy to sink into, and Goodman's prose reads up right quick. I whipped right through it, and I enjoyed it a fair bit. That said, I find that I'm having trouble reviewing it, because the things that really jump out at me are the elements that tripped me up and made it tough for me to love it.But we'll get to those in good time. There were a couple of things I really liked, and I'd prefer to start off with those.Lady Dela, one of Eon's compatriots, is right at the top of the list. She's physically male, but at no point does Eon refer to her as 'he' or demean her choice to embrace her female nature. She's not universally accepted, and Goodman makes sure we know that she's been persecuted in the past, but she remains true to her inner self. I was, so, so glad to see a trans character in a book marketed at the (North American) YA set, and I was even happier to see Goodman treat her with such honesty. The contrast between her physical sex and her true gender does hint at what Eon herself is going through, but it never becomes the focus of her character. She's a person, first and foremost.I also liked the mystery surrounding Eon's fleeting grasp on her powers. It is a tad predictable, but I don't feel that the book suffers for it. I was still eager to read on in the hopes that Eon would figure it out sooner rather than later. As a reader, I'm always ridiculously satisfied when a character finally learns something I've known for a couple hundred pages. And even though it was fairly obvious to me, (and to many others, if the reviews are anything to go by), it makes sense that Eon wouldn't clue into it right off the bat.Eon's world also made for a nice change from your standard medievalesque fantasy setting. I will say, however, that a couple of Goodman's word choices threw me. Lady Dela, for example, is called a Contraire. French, anyone? It stood out like a sore thumb in this Asian-inspired world.Now: the stuff that didn't quite work for me.EON has a large cast of characters, and Goodman does a fairly good job of limning each of them; however, I had some problems with the ways they all related to one another. I often felt like Goodman was telling us one thing and showing us another. Eon's relationship with her master was perhaps the most jarring of all. What Goodman told me about their connection was dramatically different from what she showed me.I sometimes had trouble connecting to the action, too. I'd find myself reading back over particular passages to see what it was I'd just read. I'm still not sure if this was because Goodman didn't delve deep enough for me, or if my dodgy sense of the characters' interconnections made it tough for me to commit to some of the plot stuff.All in all, though, this was an enjoyable read that I couldn't quite love, hard as I tried. I'd still recommend it to those with an interest in Asian-inspired fantasy, but I'd say that those of you who're more heavily invested in character-based stuff should proceed with some caution.(A slightly different version of this review originally appeared on my blog, Stella Matutina).
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    This was amazing. It kept me on my toes through the whole experience as i got deeper and deeper into the book. The culture in the book reminded me of Japanese and Chinese culture. I would recommended this book to anyone who is need of a good adventure. The twists that the author include made you see some very human aspects of each of the characters and made you cheer for Eon's side the more you read.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    This story just sucked me in and I read it and the sequel in just a few days. The story is about a girl who is pretending to be a boy in order to become a Dragoneye - the human counterpart to a spirit dragon. There are a lot of Japanese and Chinese cultural and historical aspects woven throughout the book including Chinese astrology which is represented by the 12 dragons. The pace of the book is relentless - there is always something going on. The characters are interesting and there are quite a few to keep track of, and the setting makes for such an interesting story. You will be cheering Eona on and holding your breath throughout the story.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    This is one of the more original fantasy novels I've read, for all that it adheres to the standard three-act adventure structure quite closely. The story is similar to Tamora Pierce's SONG OF THE LIONESS quartet, except much darker and more mature, and set in a China-based country to Pierce's Europe-based Tortall. Characters were engaging and complex, and I'm quite eager to pick up the sequel and see what happens to them next. The writing was weak in some places, and the pacing felt unrealistic at times, but the book deserves a solid four stars.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    No Mysterious (sparkling) Boy - check
    Girl disguised as a boy - check
    Adventure, magic and a unique setting - check
    Why DIDN'T I PICK this up sooner from my TBR pile - I'm a dumbass

    Eon is hiding a secret that could destroy all that he has worked for if it comes out, because he is not really a boy but a girl who is training to become a Dragon apprentice which is a role that eventually each candidate. If they are chosen to be able to helm magic of the elements and to control a dragon who is in charge of one. However Eon fails in his bid to get chosen by the dragon who he has worked hard for so many years to win, but this isn't the end for his ambition - because he hails back the missing Mirror Dragon, who has disappeared for centuries. And in the midst of all of this, chaos and betrayal rocks the kingdom and it is up to Eon/Eona to help save it.

    I ADORED this book! I love the trope of gender bending heroines, and Alison Goodman explored beautifully gender roles and sexuality with multifaceted depth. Eon/Eona was a fantastic heroine, with flaws as well as determination to succeed in a man's world and I love books where characters challenge the world's view. I really felt this was similar in tone with the Song of the Lioness series by Tamora Pierce, which is one of my all time favourite series, which fans of this series will definitely love Eon and its sequel Eona.
    With a setting that was rich and vibrant, and fleshed out characters this book was such a breath of fresh air. I have inhaled the sequel and Alison Goodman has definitely become an auto-buy author now for me.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Eon: Dragoneye Reborn is certainly unlike any book I've ever read and I'm at a loss at how to go about reviewing it. First of all I didn't have any expectations of how I would receive it but has it turns out I really enjoyed it. One of the things I really liked about it was the Chinese and Japanese influences in the story. I've always been interested in the Chinese Zodiac Animal signs. And this is basically the main angle of the book, young male contestants enter a yearly competition to become the Daragoneye Apprentice for the upcoming Animal sign.

    Eon was a candidate for his Master Heuris Brannon, who put all his eggs in one basket hoping Eon would be chosen as the Dragoneye, and help him reclaim his position as a Lord and get in a position to hinder the corruption in the counsel trying to dethrone the emperor. But you see the thing about Eon is, he's not male and is older than twelve, the age of all dragoneye contestants. I guess being poor and laboring in the salt farm most of her life gave Eon a small frame. I liked Eon's strength on how she handled and accepted the burden of all her masters hopes that was put on her, even though continually living her life as a boy did cause her some confusion. Soon Eon would realize more than her master's hope would be on her shoulders.

    There are so many elements to this story that made it very interesting and enjoyable. The different types of characters in the story for example, the Eunuchs, and the Contraires especially were an interesting facet. Eunuchs should be self-explanatory but the Contraires are said to have two souls, one male and one female. In the end for me, this was the epic story of Eon's journey to finding his or herself.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5

    I loved this book.

    So many things about it called to me. It's set in a world that's influenced by Asian culture, where the Emperor reigns over twelve Dragoneye Masters who are in touch with the twelve dragons representing the animals of the Chinese Zodiac, the individual points on the compass, certain virtues, and together have influence over the natural and spiritual world. In the midst of this fantastic world, we have Eon, who is actually a girl named Eona. She pretends to be a boy at the advice of the man who has bought her out of slavery into another form of slavery, and who trains her to compete in the annual attempts to win over that year's ascending Dragon, to be apprenticed to the Dragoneye who takes the place of the old one about to retire from his year and reign.

    Everything about this story is fantastic in the best of ways. Eon herself is a character who fits a role more than she is able to control her destiny, because of the way her world is and the firm rules that reign throughout her culture. Nevertheless, she proves to be the tool through which the action all takes place, and through which the chaos that shortly unfolds is experienced firsthand. And considering how enjoyable working through this deeply cultural tale is, I found myself not minding the role she played because I was having too great a time experiencing the story for myself.


    Strangely enough, though I remember I enjoyed the story thoroughly, I find it hard to pick out one thing over another to speak about to praise it. It's one of those books that is filled with enough action and unique controversial situations because of the very male-dominant and royalty-submissive culture that it's rooted in, that many of the features I enjoyed most about the book can be summed up through the desire to see Eon succeed as a woman in disguise where men rule.

    The book is also littered with side characters that bring a smile to your face and make you laugh, that make you think and really consider some controversial and unusual situations in a world built to be so strict. The themes of being cripple, of what gender a person is and what roles they play regardless of their natural sex is are very unique concepts to ingrain into a book so thoroughly and prominently. It's one of the places where Alison Goodman really shines with her writing. She takes deep into consideration what living in a world like this would be like, and she plays out these biases and the problems that people face about them very well. It keeps the book interesting, and puts us face to face to situations we would never have thought about having to face otherwise.

    Another huge part I loved about this book was the joy of having to face up against a truly challenging, powerful, and complex antagonist as well. It shouldn't be hard to pick his name out after you start getting a hand's breadth into the book, so I'll say the name without real concern for spoilers: Lord Ido. He is the very definition of a great bad guy, and it's his cunning and prominence that truly calls me to him as the man playing that power-hungry, but oh-so-slick role. He rules in this book as the Ascendant Dragoneye for the very year that Eon attempts to come in as his apprentice, should she be chosen by the Dragon of that year. The best part is that you know he's behind nearly all the devious events arising in this book, but he sets them into motion without ever denying that he's the one behind them, and never having to prove that he's the one behind them either. You automatically know that he's the guy that's upsetting you at every stage and turn, and so does everyone else! But he doesn't need to lift a finger in confirmation or defense since the world over acknowledges his superior skill in the role he fulfills, and the underhanded role he influences flawlessly. To further boot, there is a part at the end of the book that confirms my suspicious about his potential awesomeness as the antagonist, and also confirms my immense appreciation for his character. [No spoilers, I promise. But I will talk about this more in my review of Eona.]


    Overall, though the book has it's stupidly predictable moments from the get-go, it's got a lot of rich, great world-building around it and multifaceted characters to make reading the book a breeze. I found it deeply enjoyable and fell madly in love with it, especially with the super-amazing-spectacularly-awesome-fantastic twist at the end with Lord Ido. Me gusta. Me gusta mucha.


    This book gets a one hundred percent recommendation from me. However, before you pick up this duology, you might want to look to my review of Eona first. There is a great shift between the first book and the second which everyone should take into consideration, especially if you were thinking about buying this duology. It will be filled with spoilers that need to be addressed before the quality of these two books can be addressed as a whole, and whether they were a success or not.

    If you go over to read that review now, a major thank you for cooperating with me on that point.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    I read Eon back in 2012 and from the very first page I was drawn into it's imaginative world. At the time of reading it I had never read a novel in the first person point of view that was so richly descriptive. I really enjoyed seeing the world from Eon's point of view and it was very vivid all the way down from the Asian architecture and culture right down to the smell and taste of things. I really fell in love with the settings and lore and could not put the book down. After quite a few chapters I remember being amazed that I couldn't even remember reading a single word, it was like having a giant HD movie screen playing in my mind and I felt like I was living inside of Eon's world, facing the same choices and dreading the same consequences that she did.I found myself inexorably drawn to Eon who was basically a slave. At a very young age he was sold to the salt mines but was eventually discovered and bought by one of the ex-Dragoneyes in a last ditch effort to recover his long lost fortune and ends up apprenticing Eon in the ways of the Dragoneyes. Eon's master hopes he will be chosen by the Rat Dragon (one of the 12 mystical dragons whose Dragoneye's control their mystical energy and use it to protect the land from unnatural and natural disaster's). Eon faces a hard life, one filled of constant learning and discipline which would be hard for any young adult but Eon is also crippled. He was in a tragic accident a few years back that left his hip nearly shattered and his leg lame. So Eon finds it nearly impossible to perform all of his duties especially the combat training but he perseveres and his disability just adds another unique layer to the story.What gives the story so much more depth is that Eon and his master share a deadly secret, one that could mean death for both of them especially in the patriarchal society that they live in. You see Eon is a girl and also happens to be one of the strongest magic users her master has ever encountered. With one final hope of turning out an apprentice that could possibly become a Dragoneye he risks all in the hopes that it will salvage his lost fortune and prestige all the while Eon may just yet become the first female ever to become a Dragoneye but she would have to keep her secret until the day she dies. It's very interesting to watch Eon's dual nature. She's pretended to be a boy for so long that the girl inside of her is pretty much dead. She doesn't know what it's like to be a woman and it gets very confusing for him/her at times. If all of that isn't enough, The Kingdom is being threatened from within and there are some powerful alliances that threaten to topple this peaceful society and Eon finds herself caught right in the middle of it all.I can't praise this book enough and I look forward to more from Alison Goodman. Eon felt like a genuine heroine. She isn't all powerful, she has a lot of problems such as her bad leg and doesn't always make the best decisions. Remember she's still a very young girl that's pretending to be a man and has never really been a part of society much less wielded power and respect. She makes a lot of bad decisions and isn't able to just randomly kick everyone's butt without a sweat (kinda hard kicking butt with a lame leg) So I found her very unique, real and a refreshing change to the all powerful female leads that you see in so many YA fantasy series. I also love her internal struggle as well as watching her mature. In a world where males rule and are respected she will have to choose between the power she desires or her true nature but she is no longer sure of what that is anymore.Do yourself a huge favor and get this book along with Eona the second and final book in this outstanding duology. Eon was one my top books of 2012 and still tops my all-time favorites for YA-Fantasy. The world is familiar yet unique, the characters have layers and layers of depth and the world building is nothing short of fantastic. The fact that Alison Goodman is able to be so descriptive using the first person pov is astounding. She's an extremely talented author and Eon/Eona is a must read for all fantasy fans. I can't rate this book high enough. It's been nearly two years and Eon and her story are still stuck in my head which is just all kinds of awesome.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    This is not the typical fantasy/dragon book in which the hero goes on a quest to save someone (or something.) This is a coming of age story in which Eon fights against the odds and attempts to change the world. This book is set somewhere in the far east (China?) and incorporates the twelve animal signs of the zodiac.In the world that Eon lives in, the dragons choose the person they will work with. The ascending dragon, the one the new year embraces, becomes the leader of the dragon council, a very powerful organization working with the Emperor and manipulating earth energies for the good of the Empire. The apprentice, who had worked for 12 years to learn their dragon's power, then becomes the Dragoneye, and the dragon chooses a new apprentice. Young boys, around age 12, had been training for years for the chance to become an apprentice. Since the year of the Rat was upon them, the rat dragon would choose its apprentice. Ido, the Rat Dragoneye, would be head of the dragon council. However, there were only eleven dragons present as the Mirror dragon had not been seen for over 400 years.Eon had a carefully guarded secret. Eon was really Eona, a woman. Women were treated as second class citizens in this society and forbidden to hold any position of power. Master Brannon, former Tiger dragoneye, chose to deceive everyone by training the 16 year old Eona as 12 year old Eon. The main reason he did so was that Eon had the rare dragon sight, allowing him/her to see all 12 dragons. Eon was passed off as a eunuch to mask the feminine traits. The penalty for such deception was death, and thus it was imperative that this remain a secret.Eon was also a cripple, having a broken hip that did not heal properly. Thus Eon was not able to perform some of the moves required in the dragon training. People of that time believed that misfortune was somehow contagious and most steered clear of the cripple. Some of the other dragoneyes were resentful of Eon for taking the place of someone who was whole. But, as stated earlier, the dragon chose it's apprentice and nobody knew what factored into the choice.The Emperor was suffering ill health and there were others waiting in the wings to fill the vacuum presented. Sethon, the Emperor's brother, was commander of the empire's armies. He was feared to have the best chance of taking over once the Emperor died. The Emperor also had a sixteen year old son who was in line to take over for his father, but it did not seem he had enough power to overcome Sethon. Lord Ido, the Rat Dragoneye, was outwardly backing Sethon, however Ido had his own designs on the throne.This book was full of intrigue and political machinations not usually associated with Dragon stories. I found myself rooting for Eon, who was not only a woman, but also a crippled woman. Thrust into the middle of a political fight she was not prepared for, Eon could not afford the luxury of learning by her mistakes. I also found it an interesting metaphor that Lord Ido was the Rat Dragoneye, as the rat brings very specific connotations. There are also several different sub groups portrayed: Eon as a woman playing a man; Lady Dela, who was a man playing a woman; Ryko, Lady Dela's bodyguard, was a eunuch; and Lord Ido, the Rat Dragoneye, who exhibited symptoms of excessive steroid use.Thus "Eon" was not the typical dragon story I was expecting. However, that turned out to be a good thing. Opening up a whole new world of fantasy, Allison Goodman weaved an interesting tale of perseverance and loyalty. The only negative was that the outcome was predictable and the ending contained little closure, setting the story up for a sequel. If you enjoy rooting for the underdog, then I think you will enjoy "Eon."
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    I am so glad I finally got to read the first part of the story! Knowing where Eon was headed was helpful. If I had read them in order it would have been harder wondering what would happen to her and the her dragon. But it was easier on my nerves even if it was an accidental cheat. Still, learning what led up to what I had all ready read was great. I understood ITO a little more and her relationship with the others Rieko and Lady D, seeing how the relationship with Rilla and her son had been when she was with her "Master". The Pearl Emporer's friendship and knowing how they supported each other through the their individual losses helped me to understand more the way things turn out in the EONA. Absolutely LOVED these books. Will recommend them to many of our kids that come in here.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    Eona has spent the last several years of her life living as a boy named Eon, training to be a Dragoneye. Dragoneyes connect with mystical dragons and harness their power to keep the land safe. Eona becomes the mirror dragoneye, a dragoneye that hasn't been seen in 500 years.

    The story is interesting and moves quickly, however about half way through the book I saw where the plot was going. It became obvious to me that the dragon was looking to connect with the female side that Eon was repressing and that the folio he was unable to read would be written in women's writing. Being able to figure out the plot so early on disappointed me, but the story was still interesting enough for me to continue reading. Looking forward to the sequel.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    God that was exactly what I've been needing. (Full review eventually)
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    A great read. truly immersive world with fascinating characters and lore. I can't wait to read the sequel!
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    What can I say about books like these? It wasn't that bad. It wasn't that good either. Had this been a book I had read when I just started out reading fantasy I might have been more positive about it. It wasn't and therefore I can only say it is a standard fantasy. Pretty boring.


    Couple of things:

    1) Why is the heroin suddenly rewarded with superpowers, status etc. This is so cliche. I'm not saying it can't be done, but if it is done it should be done masterfully, because anything falling short of that is just so boring. Unfortunatly it wasn't done masterfully, not bad either, but as I said...

    2) The evil villan. For god-sake couldn't he have been less like a high-school bully and more like a real person.

    3) The evil villan's prodigy. Why do we even need one?

    4) The world could fit on the back of a post stamp. This is the feeling I get reading this book. It is not a good feeling.

    5) Innocent girl get introduced to political intrigue. How often has this been done?

    6) I'm willing to bet (I haven't read that far) she meets a boy and it is love at first sight, she doesn't want to fall for him, but she just can't help it. He happens to be from a powerful family. Together they have to defeat the evil lord/supernatural/army/etc.

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    I would never have picked this up to read on my own, but I really enjoyed it.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    Eon is a cripple trying to become the next dragon apprentice. But he is hiding a bigger secret than anyone knows - and as he emerges as an unknown power in court, he will have to keep this secret hidden as many eyes watch his every move.

    I like this book a lot. It hit all the right spots in my YA fantasy craving. It had solid moments, great action, and lovely characters to cheer on. Eon, or Eona really, is a great character. There is true strength in her character, not just the author telling us she is strong. The way she goes forward and tries to solve her problems without giving up is worth reading. I also appreciated how sensible she was. This is a first person point of view that doesn't grate on me at all.

    I am completely in love with the way Goodman was able to write the exposure scenes when Eona had to reveal her secrets. I love the doubt and the anger of the side characters, and the angry defensive way Eona responded in kind. I felt angry reading it and just as frustrated - perfect translation of emotions from pages to the reader. It felt real. Where no character is perfect, everyone makes mistakes and judges other people on their own perceptions. The author writes subtlety so well. Like ahhmygosh this is beautiful, sort of subtlety. She can capture emotion between characters -hidden love, betrayal, disgust, fear, anger- in such simple ways. It is never heavy handed, never spoon fed to the reader. But we see it in the softness of the dialogue, the harsh commands, the body language. This book leaves me space to imagine, and I love it for that.

    One thing, though, is that there are very limited characters in this book. I don't mind because it's a YA fantasy and if you introduced more major characters, it would end up being more of an epic high fantasy sort of book, which it definitely is not. But I'm just a little concerned for the sequel because a small character cast usually ends up with a shallow story and plot for the sequels...... But I'll just have to trust the author.

    The world is rather interesting because even though it's set in this quasi-Eastern Asian world with analogues of the zodiac, dragons, emperors, the dichotomy of the Sun and Moon powers in people, and talk of foreigners, we can still see remnants of the modern world. Sun powder is obviously steroids. Little things like that. It manages to be different and familiar at the same time. But it is easy in its familiarity and makes it even easier for me to fall into this world.

    The dragon powers are a bit amorphous at this moment. I am hoping Goodman will elucidate more about how it all works in the future books. Illusions and fighting techniques and swords that can hold emotions. Yes it is all interesting. But I want to know a little more of the rules that govern this type of magic. I am eagerly waiting. Also, I am not sold on the fact that one dragon can be so much more powerful.

    The plot was absolutely fantastic. I just have all the highest praises for Goodman's writing. She doesn't give away the tension. She makes it harder for the main character, to let us see Eona's strength when the problems are finally resolved. The protagonist doesn't always win. And that is fantastic.

    Although I only rated this book three stars, it's actually a very solid 3.5 stars. And if I ever reread this series, I will change the rounding from three to four. I am not sure it can last the test of a second read, so that's why I'm hesitating and rounding it down for now. 4 stars, for me, means I definitely will reread it. And right now, it's up in the air. But my gosh, I can tell I'm going to like this series already. And I will definitely be looking up other books from this author.

    Highly recommended to YA fantasy readers.

    -edit-
    Read the sequel "Eona" and I would still recommend this book. But book one is better than the second. I probably won't reread this series though. It doesn't end as strongly as I would have liked.