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Sex on the Brain: 12 Lessons to Enhance Your Love Life

Sex on the Brain: 12 Lessons to Enhance Your Love Life

Written by Daniel G. Amen

Narrated by Patrick Lawlor


Sex on the Brain: 12 Lessons to Enhance Your Love Life

Written by Daniel G. Amen

Narrated by Patrick Lawlor

ratings:
3.5/5 (18 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jan 1, 2007
ISBN:
9781400174027
Format:
Audiobook

Description

"The vast majority of love and sex occurs in the brain. Your brain decides who is attractive to you, how to get a date, how well you do on the date, what to do with the feelings that develop, how long those feelings last, when to commit, and how well you do as a partner and a parent. Your brain helps you be enthusiastic in the bedroom or drains you of desire and passion. Your brain helps you process and learn from a breakup or makes you vulnerable to depression or obsession."



While plastic surgeons, diet gurus, and the pharmaceutical industry may have convinced you that they hold the secret to a fulfilling sex life, the truth is that you already have the only thing you really need: a brain. As the largest and most sensitive sexual organ in the body, a healthy human brain enhances your sex life and heightens sensation. A troubled brain, however, makes emotional and physical connection with others difficult. So forget the implants, the fad diets, and the pills. Learning about this intriguing and sexy organ is the key to your sexual satisfaction.



Based on Dr. Daniel Amen's latest research in practical neuroscience, Sex on the Brain shares twelve lessons that help you enhance your love and sex lives through understanding and improving brain function. Filled with practical suggestions and information on how sex can save your life, Sex on the Brain reveals:



-How sex helps prevent heart disease, improve memory, stave off cancer, and boost your immune system



-How the differences between men's and women's brains affect our perceptions and interest in sex-and how you can understand these differences to make the most of the opportunities with your partner



-Why breakups hurt so much, and what you can do to ease the pain



-Surefire techniques to fix common problems-depression, PMS, ADD-that get in the way of good sex



-How to make yourself unforgettable to your partner



Everyone wants to know how to improve his or her love life, but so few of us understand the integral role that the brain plays in getting us in the mood, keeping us excited about our partner, and helping us achieve greater satisfaction. Sex on the Brain explains everything, showing you how use your brain to create a healthy, happy, and hot sex life.
Publisher:
Released:
Jan 1, 2007
ISBN:
9781400174027
Format:
Audiobook

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What people think about Sex on the Brain

3.3
18 ratings / 3 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I really liked this book. It was easy to read and actually answered the questions that I could not find the answers to anywhere else.I understand the nature of crushes and infatuation now. In short, when I have a crush my body is actually tricking me, by releasing hormones to get around self preservation. Crushes by nature are illogical. But if there is nothing to get you to become attracted to another person you would never have a desire to have a boyfriend. DAMN HORMONES!If you want the specifics as to what is actually going on you will have to just read the book yourself.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)
    An interesting book overall with a lot of good information about how to keep a focused, healthy brain.

    The most interesting part of the book to me was where he describes how the various parts of the brain affect one's mood, including one's sexual drive (or lack thereof) and the foods you can eat and habits you can cultivate to help them function properly. My least favorite part was his section on identifying personality disorders -- mainly because with each section I started wondering if he was describing me.... (I hear that's normal when reading these kinds of books, but it's no less disconcerting.)

    One of the things that struck me while reading this book is making your brain (and therefore your sex life!) healthier isn't really all that different from making your body healthier overall. Basically: Exercise regularly, eat right, avoid junk food and unnecessary drugs. Granted there's a little more to it than just that, especially if you have some physical or emotional trauma, but it's a good place to start.

    My biggest criticism is that the author seems to view things a little too much from his specialist point of view. Looking at your behavior as a function of your brain activity (or lack of activity) is certainly useful and beneficial from time to time. But I would argue that it's just as good not to think too much about whether one's brain is working properly, lest it become an obsession.

    And of course, I believe that looking at the physical is only half of the equation. I do think that there is a metaphysical ingredient as well. (I understand the argument that metaphysical feelings, such as those that we have with regard to "free will" or possessing a "soul," could themselves be a trick of the brain, but if that's the case, why fight it? Clearly our brains think such metaphysical feelings are beneficial to us, and evolution has equipped us with such brains, so embracing those feelings must be a good thing, right?) I enjoy thinking about chicken-and-egg problems such as: Are decisions made by activity in the brain or does brain activity occur because decisions are made? Regardless, where does the decision or activity originate? Does a brain that is functioning properly make "right" or "good" decisions, or even "more correct" and "better" decisions on average? And so on...
  • (3/5)
    Interesting, but I wonder...
    Recently there have been stories about using oxytocin spray to heal broken relationships. Hmm. It could work, I suppose, but it think doing a load of laundry might be better overall. Or perhaps just touching one another.
    This book talks about brain chemicals and how they affect emotions. Since we understand so very little about the brain anyway (hey, I have MS and they have no idea how to work with that), and the medications they use for depression and other brain disorders work in unpredictable and undefined ways and also seem to really mess with so many other things, I found the good doctor's recommendations a bit scary.
    I love reading about the brain. I hate the idea that taking a pill that alters brain chemistry is the solution to everything.