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All Through the Night: A Troubleshooter Christmas

All Through the Night: A Troubleshooter Christmas

Written by Suzanne Brockmann

Narrated by Michael Holland


All Through the Night: A Troubleshooter Christmas

Written by Suzanne Brockmann

Narrated by Michael Holland

ratings:
4/5 (17 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Released:
Oct 30, 2007
ISBN:
9781423342885
Format:
Audiobook

Description

It's Christmastime in Boston, and this year the silver bells will be wedding bells as FBI agent Jules Cassidy ties the knot with the man of his dreams, Hollywood heartthrob Robin Chadwick.

The pair plan a quiet, intimate ceremony, to be witnessed by family and close friends from the FBI, SEAL Team Sixteen, and Troubleshooters, Incorporated, including Sam Starrett and Alyssa Locke. But the holiday season brings more to the happy couple than they expect.

A waterfall coming through their kitchen ceiling, a bat colony in the attic, old family tensions…even an international incident can't dampen their spirits. But add to that a parade of unexpected guests, including a reporter looking for a scoop, an ex-lover hell-bent on causing trouble, and a dangerous stalker, and suddenly the wedding is poised to unravel in chaos.

But nothing will stop Jules and Robin from getting their happy ending, because along with a guest list featuring the most elite counterterrorism force in the world, they have their own secret weapon - true love.

Released:
Oct 30, 2007
ISBN:
9781423342885
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Suzanne Brockmann is an award-winning author of more than fifty books and is widely recognized as one of the leading voices in romantic suspense. Her work has earned her repeated appearances on the New York Times bestseller list, as well as numerous awards, including Romance Writers of America’s #1 Favorite Book of the Year and two RITA awards. Suzanne divides her time between Siesta Key and Boston. Visit her at www.SuzanneBrockmann.com.


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Reviews

What people think about All Through the Night

3.8
17 ratings / 14 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (2/5)
    BURNING HATE.
  • (4/5)
    Anne Wilder is a demure companion by day and a cat thief by night, pursued by Colonel Jack Seward, an agent for the government. Jack is confused by his attraction to both the plain widow and the burglar, but is determined to catch the thief and solve the mystery.There are complex machinations behind all of this and the author does a wonderful job of gradually revealing them. Both Anne and Jack are nuanced characters with good reasons for their behavior. I admit I took one star off because I don't believe that a man would not be able to tell that this was one woman after several meetings; I've always had trouble with these types of stories where the woman tries to disguise her identity and no one recognizes her. But otherwise, this was a great book with well-drawn characters and an interesting plot.
  • (4/5)
    This book grew on me. The beginning was a bit slow and confusing. In the middle I was a bit disturbed by the hero and heroine's use of sexuality in their power dynamics. But I enjoyed their growing relationship once they stopped fighting each other.One weak point I think was the story of the girl the heroine was supposed to be chaperoning. It didn't really add anything, and bogged down the plot a bit.
  • (4/5)
    All Through the Night - A Troubleshooter ChristmasTroubleshooters series #12Jules & Robin; Will & DolphinaThis covers the proposal and preparation for Jules' and Robin's wedding, along with working around issues like a Boston Globe reporter (Will Schroeder) crashing their bridal shower, taping a private conversation with Robin, then having it fall into the hands of a rival reporter who writes for a tabloid magazine and, of course, using only the sound bites that would make Robin look bad. Will has to claw his way back into the good graces of Jules, Robin, and Dolphina, their personal assistant, whom he has fallen hard for. The guys' former lover, Adam Wyndham, who is known to stir up trouble between them, is being threatened by a mentally ill man who thinks Adam has an evil twin who is an alien robot. Hmm, the way he acts, it could be true. The stalker turns violent, causing Adam to run to Jules for help. In doing so, he brings the man directly to the door of Robin and Jules' home, putting everyone there in danger.There is a poignant moment on their wedding day when Robin almost misses the wedding ceremony due to circumstances out of his control.This installment is full of occasions showing the love and support between the guys and all of their friends and (most of) their family members--kind of like most weddings, huh? There's always going to be someone in the family who is a butthead. Sam & Jules have another heart to heart and Sam proves once again to be a great sounding board and full of solid advice.Even though the last book in the series was the story where Jules and Robin realize they can't live without each other, I liked this one even better because we got to listen in on their serious conversations where they discussed jealousy, trust, unconditional love, etc., and saw how they worked through what was troubling them. Their love has grown and matured. This was a great example of what a romance story--and a workable marriage--should be like.
  • (4/5)
    This book never really sucked me in and I'm not sure why. Seward was a really compelling hero; he was so in love, and so ashamed of his feelings...incredibly strong but still oddly bashful. He's gorgeous, but his voice is raspy because he was hung (on a noose) for two minutes, and he has a crippled hand. Very stiff, bottled up, proper, yet really believably ruthless and passionate.

    I liked Anne quite a bit as well but I expect that she's the one I had the problem with. I just didn't buy her as a thief. Her thief-personality was too different from her everyday personality. And her reasons for stealing weren't compelling enough for me. She is independently quite wealthy, so her nighttime escapades have a Robin Hood aspect.

    The plot is pretty good; relatively simple, but well-done, and it makes sense.
  • (4/5)
    All Through The Night is a book that takes place around Christmastime, in Boston, Massachusets. Where FBI agent Jules Cassidy becomes engaged to Robin Chadwick, the love of his life. Their plan for their wedding is a small ceremony with just family and close friends, with Sam Starret and his wife Alyssa. But then they receive the news that the President will be attending the wedding, and they have to move it from small and intimate to a large fiasco. But during their engagement, there are other problems that surface, that could put them both in danger and threaten them both. So now the Wedding could be thrown in Chaos.All Through The Night is my favorite of the Troubleshooter series, since I just love Jules and Robin, but most especially Jules. For most of the books we see him in them, so now we have his and Robins story, and their wedding (and I just love wedding stories) especially involving these two characters. There is also a subplot with their secretary and a research reporter, who has been captured by terrorists and knows how it is to be tortured, and manages to save Jule's life. So in this wonderful Holiday story, we see the true power of love. This was definitely one of my favorite contemporary romances to read, and would recommend this one to anyone that loves a good romance that will bring out the best of stories!!
  • (4/5)
    Re-read April 2011This one is really for fans of Jules & Robin. It's a novella (longish at 270 pages) and it doesn't pretend to have the usual Troubleshooters story arc. The story charts the course of Jules & Robin's wedding from proposal to reception and readers get to have a brief catch up with many of the other TS characters, including Sam & Alyssa. I enjoyed it as I had done when I first read it. My only bugbear is that the sex scenes were too tame - in m/f scenes the author, while not super graphic or anything, usually gives more detail, but most of the m/m was fade to black. I'm not sure why.
  • (3/5)
    If you like lots of profanity and gay love stories, then you will enjoy this title. Nothing on the audio book's slip cover really indicated that it would be anything other than a typical love story. Since it was my only alternative while on a trip, I listened to it. It would not be at all appropriate for children given the frequency with which the "f" word is used. Once the story gets going it's fairly entertaining, but it was not one that would motivate me to try other examples of Brockmann's work.
  • (5/5)
    Jules and Robin!!!!!!! Finally happy and together, Jules and Robin are starting their lives, preparing for their first Christmas, when they begin receiving threats from a stalker.This is Brockmann's first to star two homosexual lovers - Jules and Robin have been recurring characters, but have always had the second or third tier storylines. Brockmann writes just as sweet and romantically for these two men as she does for her male/female leads (though the sex scenes are less explicit than the male/female scenes).This was a great story, as well as a thoroughly charming love story - I loved it!!!Recommended.
  • (3/5)
    I love Jules and I love Robin, but I was a bit disappointed with this book. I loved that they had their happy ending and I loved seeing all the old characters return, but it felt a bit like a cop-out. Absolutely nowhere near as great as Force of Nature, which truly had action admid their romance. They were far too mushy with each other. I almost felt like they were turning into romance heroines, yet she's never written her other couples like that. Jules is FBI and Robin was a "ladies man" for far too long. These doe-eyed love birds were pushing the believability factor a bit too much for me.
  • (5/5)
    Not the best of the Troubleshooters series but still really great because Jules's character is so awesome. It's love scenes are a little awkward because it's a romance about two gay guys but it's also really normal and sweet at the same time. I'm really happy Suzanne told Jules's story!
  • (2/5)
    Connie Brockway's novel All Through the Night is a story about a widow (Anne) who steals to assuage her guilt over her husband's death (and well the men that died with him). She steals jewelry from rich ladies who pledge to contribute to her charity for injured and homeless soliders but fail to follow through. Apparently, her husband (Matthew) committed suicide by War. Basically he contrived to get someone to give him a Captain's commission based on a scant amount of naval experience. Then wandered off into battle resulting his own death and his entire crew. Prior to his death - he sent his wife a note telling her that she would be free of him now, and her inability to love him as he deserved. The War was the Napoleanic War. But this is a Regency Romance. So it takes place after that WAR. The hero (Col. Jack Seward), who is tracking the thief, is a spy and a bit of a hardened rogue. He's being manipulated by his father (Jamison) who is the head of some covert agency and sends Jack out to do all sorts of underhanded things. Jack and Anne fall in love, much angst ensues.

    The blurb on the cover led me to believe it would be a cat and mouse game - it's not. Lacks humor, which is odd, considering the last novel I'd read by Brockway (The Other Guy's Bride) was actually fairly humorous. This one is a wee bit too melodramatic for its own good. And Brockway over sells Anne's backstory. Anne was married to a Narcissist, who everyone else considered a saint, and it led her to become a cat burgler or jewel thief.

    Jack is more interesting. The heroes often are in these novels, not quite sure why. Without going into too much detail, Jack was raised in a work house and then adopted by Jamison, who turned him into a spy. The novel does provide some rather complex, if unlikable, supporting characters. And Jamison, who is clearly a sociopath, is far more complex than you'd think from the brief description. But the plot suffers from the writer's struggle to create hot love scenes, which is admittedly a genre related flaw. Sex scenes are not easy to write - literary writers struggle with them. There's a fine line between erotic and just plain ludicrous. The old adage less is more rings true here.

    All Through the Night is however interesting in how it depicts the struggle for gender equality in this time period. How women are often suppressed by men. The hero (Jack) at one point in the story, actually thinks to himself - how he is the heroine's "superior in gender, physical strength and rank". This is admittedly before the heroine in the guise of a thief, steals into his room, ties him up, and has her way with him sexually, while holding him at swordpoint, then physically bests him and escapes. It's also stated at various points, how she has a lot more money than he does. But the heroine is called "MRS Wilder" not Anne. MRS stands out, because the other women are Miss or Lady. And in most of these novels you see the word Lady. I've come to the conclusion that the word "MRS" has got to be the most sexist of terms. The woman is no longer an individual - she takes on her spouses' identity and name. Unlike MR - which does not have a marital connotation or one of ownership, MRS does. This book really underlines it - and does it in a rather subversive manner.

    Brockway is a somewhat subversive romance novelist in that she likes to critique various tropes. In this novel - Anne Tribble marries Lord Matthew Wilder, who showers her with riches, adores her, but doesn't want her to have kids or is into sexual love - which he considers lust and beneath them. He can love her, but she can't sexually love him. He wants her to let him take her over, become his. Not just take his name, but everything else as well. He's a fairy tale prince who appears, at least on the surface, to hand poor Anne, from less than classy roots, the world. But she grows to hate his insecure and fawning attentions and despise herself for feeling this way. Until she decides to leave him and live with her father. Unable to handle her abandonment, he enlists and kills himself and his men - to punish her. Resulting in Anne martyring herself to a cause and robbing rich ladies as a thief, that everyone but the hero, believes is male - the hero knows she isn't because she propositions him. As the thief she takes on the aggressive and proactive male role. She has the power. Until the rough around the edges, and Colonel of modest means, Jack Seward swoops in and rescues her taking her away from that life. She becomes his Mrs. Seward. And when all is resolved, which of course it will be, Jack and Anne disappear together within the fog. Normally, in these books, Seward is the fiend and Matthew the hero, but here it is the opposite. We never meet Matthew - he's dead before the book begins.

    The story works and it doesn't quite work. In that the writer takes the story a wee bit too seriously, and the characters feel at times over-drawn or over-wrought. Far too much time is spent on erotic sex scenes - which could have been shortened, and repetitive monologues about how much the two characters desire each other and can't live without one another - which unfortunately comes across more as "obsession" than love. And does little to counteract against the Matthew/Anne back story. The dialogue also lacks a certain snap, crackle and pop.

    Overall not a bad read, but can't say I recommend it either.
  • (3/5)
    I loved Jack. He is a very sexy and seriously pent-up enforcer. Jack and Anne together as predator and thief is so hot. They are intense and deliciously angsty lovers. The characters and world surrounding the two is less enthralling and unevenly held my attention.
  • (5/5)
    Great fun. This is Troubleshooters light - all the great characterization, witty banter and humor Brockmann's known for but without the death, destruction and mayhem. Wonderful Brockmann, as usual. I'm glad that Jules and Robin finally got their happy ending, and that I got some nice glimpses into some of the characters whose stories were told in previous books. Thoroughly enjoyable for any fan of the Troubleshooters series.