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Redirect: The Surprising New Science of Psychological Change

Redirect: The Surprising New Science of Psychological Change

Written by Timothy D. Wilson

Narrated by Grover Gardner


Redirect: The Surprising New Science of Psychological Change

Written by Timothy D. Wilson

Narrated by Grover Gardner

ratings:
4.5/5 (21 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Released:
Sep 8, 2011
ISBN:
9781611745849
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Why might some sex education programs result in more teen pregnancies? Why did reading that self-help book make you feel less happy? What’s the best way to recover from trauma? Can we actually improve our lives by redirecting our thinking?
 
We tell ourselves stories to make sense of the world. These stories ultimately determine if we will lead healthy, productive lives or get into trouble. Renowned psychologist Timothy Wilson proposes a radical new view: although these stories can be very hard to change, they can change—surprisingly quickly—if tweaked in the right way. He considers a broad range of problems, exposes failed attempts to solve them, and reframes them with new stories. Scientifically tested, his practical advice and simple techniques have been found to bring about real results including enhanced happiness, personal meaning, and social progress.
Released:
Sep 8, 2011
ISBN:
9781611745849
Format:
Audiobook

About the author



Reviews

What people think about Redirect

4.4
21 ratings / 4 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)

    2 people found this helpful

    Brilliant read on the power and reach of the scripts we all have in our minds and what we can do to change them. The book also slays some sacred cows like The Secret and other books like it.

    2 people found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    2 people found this helpful

    Does it work? - I have a whole new respect for social scientists and a new sadness for my DARE certificate.

    2 people found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    5 people found this helpful

    "Redirect" by Timothy D. Wilson is built around the concept of Story Editing, which he describes asusing changes, or edits, in the stories we use to understand ourselves and the social world aroundus, to make lasting changes in our lives and the lives of others.He shows why Self-Help authors, Scared Straight programs and D.A.R.E. initiatives don't work,have never been scientifically tested and why efforts such as these deserve what he calls,"Bloodletting" awards - solutions that seem to make sense, much like bloodletting once did to physicians, but do more harm than good.Wilson discusses shaping our personal narratives and expands from there to the topics of raising kids, preventing teen pregnancy, teenage violence, alcohol and drug abuse, prejudice and the achievement gap. His chapter on raising kids seemed the weakest, especially the minimal sufficiencyprincipal, which I took as too fine a line when trying to be neither too harsh or too lenient when disciplining children. However, his other chapters provide interesting ideas on how storyediting can be used to counter what would seem to be intractable personal and social problems.My three main take-aways were:1. Wilson's clear-eyed examination of the problems with policy makers, self-help authors andnon-psychologists who rely on common sense to solve problems and fall into the trap ofequaling correlation with causation.2. His chapter on prejudice was very stimulating, including the insight that when it comes to race we overestimate our differences and underestimate what we have in common.3. The Stereotype Threat discussed in chapter 9 was a profound discovery and his use of studies and possible solutions (emphasizing positive aspects of the race and positive role models) was one of the stronger chapters.In sum, Mr. Wilson has written a book on change supported by scientifically-validated studiesthat counter so much of the accepted wisdom and programs that exist today. While much of the book is dedicated to fighting large-scale, social issues, there is enough material on personalchange to make this book a recommended choice for every reader.

    5 people found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Enjoyable read --- not a whole lot of new information, but there were a few surprises. It made sense that CISD (Critical Incident Stress Debriefing) was not effective; reliving stressful events often just brings up uncontrollable emotions whereas time helps one bring perspective to the narrative. There are some useful exercises in the "Shaping Our Narratives" chapter that seem reasonable. There was also confirmation of the current parenting advice of praising the effort, not the innate abilities of the child, and a restatement of what most parents know -- your kid's friends matter! The author reveals that many popular social programs are ineffective, including those dealing with stress, teen crime, teen pregnancy, and drug use. The newest, and most interesting information was about stereotype threat and how to deal with it. I certainly agree with the author that programs should be more rigorously tested before implemented on a wide scale and hope that this is the future of social psychology.

    1 person found this helpful