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One More for the Road

One More for the Road

Written by Ray Bradbury

Narrated by Campbell Scott


One More for the Road

Written by Ray Bradbury

Narrated by Campbell Scott

ratings:
3.5/5 (8 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jul 5, 2005
ISBN:
9780060855048
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

For more than fifty years Ray Bradbury has regaled us with wonders, enabled us to view from fresh perspectives the world we inhabit, and see others we never dreamed existed.

Here are eighteen brand-new stories and seven previously published but never before collected stories -- proof positive that Bradbury's magic is as potent as ever.

Sip the sweet innocence of youth, the wisdom -- and folly -- of age. Taste the warm mysteries of summer and bitterness of betrayed loves and abandoned places. These stories will set your mind spinning and carry you to remarkable locales: a house where lime has no boundaries; a movie theater where deconstructed schlock is drunkenly assembled into art; a wheat field that hides a strangely welcome enemy. These are but a few of the ingredients that have gone into Bradbury's savory cocktail. And every satisfying swallow brings new surprises and revelations.

Publisher:
Released:
Jul 5, 2005
ISBN:
9780060855048
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Ray Bradbury (22 August 1920 – 5 June 2012) published some 500 short stories, novels, plays and poems since his first story appeared in Weird Tales when he was twenty years old. Among his many famous works are 'Fahrenheit 451,' 'The Illustrated Man,' and 'The Martian Chronicles.'

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Reviews

What people think about One More for the Road

3.5
8 ratings / 6 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Given to me by relatives of the author. Contains one of my favorite short stories (among all short stories read, ever) and two I liked. I don't remember the other stories so will need to reread.
  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Well, I got into Bradbury a little later in life, but I've really enjoyed his work. Typically, really imaginative and riveting. I guess that's why this only received three stars. It wasn't bad writing - I don't think that's possible by Bradbury. But the stories were a bit mundane and I guess I was just hungry for something else. No rocket-ships, no sinister characters, no otherworldly beings, really, for the most part, the stories could have been non-fiction in most of the cases (a couple of exceptions). It just wasn't what I was expecting, or what I really wanted right then. But, the writing as always at least, was topnotch.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    The spectre of death hangs over these twenty-five short stories by Ray Bradbury, but not in the way you'd expect, or in any way that is at all fun or especially interesting. Aging, the end of life, and the regret that accompanies these things are the book's central themes, and although a few of these stories were written while the author was still a young man, they nonetheless come across as insubstantial, dated, (especially in the pieces that deal with relationships), and overly sentimental - certainly not Bradbury at his best. Still, there are a few gems here for those who care to dig, most notably, "Where All Is Emptiness There Is Room To Move," "With Smiles As Wide As Summer," and the heartbreaking, "The Nineteenth," all of which move forward with humour and genuine emotion. For a similarly-themed story collection with sharper teeth, check out Harlan Ellison's 'Angry Candy.'

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    A collection of short stories by Ray Bradbury, Recently published. Some of these stories were very good, but some seemed forced. Ray’s new stories seem to lack the balls and anger that his older work possessed. Still good, but not his best work.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)
    I wasn't sure about this book of short stories to start with, as the first couple didn't grab me at all. But as I continued, I realised that all the stories were about loss. There are some ghost stories, and time-travel features in a couple more, but others are set in the real world.
  • (3/5)
    One More for the Road is a short story collection by Ray Bradbury. It consists of 24 unrelated stories, 17 of which had never been published before. Bradbury is a master of the genre, and this book contains some really nice stories. It also contained some that fell very flat. A few of the stories grabbed my, and several others were very interesting in concept, but just weren't my style. Unfortunately a lot of the stories didn't meet either of those criteria for me. The Nineteenth was my favorite. It was a moving story of a man mysteriously encountering he deceased father on a golf course looking for lost balls. The Dragon Danced at Midnight was a furiously paced story of the rise of a filmmaker via the lucky accident of a drunken projectionist showing the reels of his film out of order. Autumn Afternoon was a sad tale, of an old woman and her young niece. The niece saves calendar pages as remembrances. When cleaning out her attic the lady finds a stack of her own calendar pages from her youth, but she can't recall why she saved them. For the rest the tales were mostly forgettable. Not bad really, just not remarkable. If you are a fan of Bradbury, feel free to give this a shot. You may like it more than I did. If you are new to the man, I'd stick with Fahrenheit 451 or the Martian Chronicles. 5 out of 10