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The Crow: The Third Book of Pellinor

The Crow: The Third Book of Pellinor

Written by Alison Croggon

Narrated by Colin Moody


The Crow: The Third Book of Pellinor

Written by Alison Croggon

Narrated by Colin Moody

ratings:
4.5/5 (13 ratings)
Length:
18 hours
Released:
Jun 14, 2011
ISBN:
9781441862907
Format:
Audiobook

Description

While Maerad journeys in the far north, her brother, Hem, is sent south to the golden city of Turbansk. There he learns the ways of the Bards and discovers a hidden gift when he rescues a white crow. But when the forces of the Dark threaten, Hem flees with his protector, Saliman, and a young orphan girl named Zelika to join the Light's resistance forces. Soon Hem discovers that he, too, has a crucial role to play in the quest to solve the Riddle of the Treesong.

"This penultimate epic...is emotionally astute and brimming with vivid detail." -Kirkus Reviews

Released:
Jun 14, 2011
ISBN:
9781441862907
Format:
Audiobook

About the author



Reviews

What people think about The Crow

4.5
13 ratings / 10 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    This book, the third in the series, is particularly dark, with the feeling of threat and unease woven throughout the second half of the book. Some of the imagery is particularly unsettling, especially that regarding children, with sections that reminded me of Nazi concentration camps. I say this because this book is listed in the Junior section of my local library, which I'm not entirely sure is suitable, I would suggest Young Adult would be more appropriate.With all of that said, I still enjoyed the journey, the friendships and the magery.
  • (5/5)
    All novels, and especially fantasy novels, provide the opportunity for authors to create their own worlds in which to place their characters, and in large measure what makes the story convincing is the plausibility of that secondary world. Croggon's land of Edil-Amarandh is given credible substance by its characters' interaction with the geography, climate and changing seasons, and the success of The Crow and the other Pellinor books is enhanced by the impression that Maerad and Hem, Cadvan and Saliman are all inhabiting a real landscape: we are with them, almost in real-time, every step of their journeys, every rest in their tasks. It may or not help to imagine their world as perhaps that straddling what is now the mid-Atlantic ridge between Newfoundland and western Europe, sometime towards the end of the last Ice Age when sea levels were lower, but it is not essential, particularly as Croggon's storytelling skill provides the verisimilitude to convincingly transport us to this sprawling continent in the grip of unfathomable changes.Fans of Maerad from the first and second books may baulk at a volume in which she gets only passing mentions, but her brother Hem becomes as fascinating and sympathetic a character as his sister in the course of nearly 500 pages. In many ways The Crow appears as a narrative reflection of The Riddle: they straddle the same time-frame, ending with each of the two siblings meeting up with a lost friend on Midwinter's Day; one sibling travels to the north-west, the other to the south-east to gain insights into the Treesong; both become imprisoned though in rather different circumstances, having to rely on their own inner resources; both discover they have gifts that they were not aware of; and both are rightly distressed when they lose significant friends. But The Crow is not just a mirror image of The Riddle, and the dangers Hem meets and his responses to events and predicaments are strikingly different from his sister's.The Crow is an absorbing read, and while there are stretches where nothing much seems to happen, the inner turmoil and personal growth that Hem undergoes is as essential to Croggon's tale as any burst of action is to a more conventional sword-and-sorcery novel. Love and loyalty, beauty and poetry alternate with scenes of horror and destruction and cruelty; the feeling that one is there when Turbansk is besieged, when the child-soldiers are abused, when friends are separated or re-united is strong throughout these pages and re-inforces the reader's empathy and sympathy for the youngsters in the story as they grow old before their time. It is a harsh observer who doesn't engage with Hem and Irc, his friend the white crow.
  • (3/5)
    I wished it stayed with Maerad's POV, but oh well.
  • (4/5)
    The Crow by Alison Croggon was not my favorite of the 3 Books of Pellinor I've read, but it was still a great read. It was entertaining and sometimes even scary. And I cried once. And yes, I do tend to like books more when they make me cry! I think it's because the characters have to be well-written in order for me to connect with them at all. But more on that later.The first 2 books in this series follow a young girl named Maerad and her friend Cadvan on their journey to find something called the "treesong." Book 3 changes direction a bit. It follows Hem, Maerad's younger brother. He has been brought to the Suderain, a land in the south, by his mentor Saliman. Their city, Turbansk, is under attack. The city's seige, Hem's escape, and Hem's travels deep into evil lands fill the pages of this story.I found this book to be a bit slow in the beginning, but I chalk it up to the new characters. Maerad and Cadvan dominated the 1st 2 books, and I love them both dearly. So the character changes were definitely noticed. Once I got to know Hem, Saliman, and the others from The Crow (Hem and Saliman we actually meet in earlier books, we just don't know them too well), this book went a lot faster. My favorite character has to be Irc, the white crow Hem nurses back to health. The things he says are priceless and made me laugh out loud. I also love how even when Irc is surrounded by evil and in danger of death, his obsession with shiny things is still in full swing, leading him to steal a pendant from the leader of the Dark. My other favorite character is Zelika, Hem's friend. She is spritely, spicy, and has a lot of attitude. She has a thirst for revenge and a lot a energy. I connected with her immediately. All in all, this was a great read. If you've read books 1 and 2, read this one too. It's weird because Maerad and Cadvan aren't in it at all, but it's still fun to read, and fun to meet new characters. I especially loved seeing Hem's transformation from child in the beginning to young adult at the end. I can't wait to read book 4.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting and well paced, but somehow less enthralling than the previous two. This surprised me because Hem's transformation is in many ways more interesting than Maered's and he wallows a great deal less than she does. Maybe a second reading will improve it. Just the same, I enjoyed reading this book and would still recommend it.
  • (5/5)
    When I first came across Hem, the protagonist of this story, in The Gift, I didn't develop anything like the same sympathy for him that I had for his sister Maerad, the protagonist of that book. So I was expecting to find The Crow a lot less stimulating than the other books in the series but decided to read it anyway, for the sake of completeness. I'm glad I did, because it turned out to be a very exciting, and at times very moving, story. It was interesting, too, to get a different perspective on some of the same events narrated in the previous books.
  • (5/5)
    This story IS spiritual warfare. Allegorical in the vein of Tolkien, and GOOD... not a copycat. It's part of the Pellinor series, following The Naming and The Riddle. The Crow takes up the story of the brother of the heroine from those two books, Maerad. Hem is not only separated from the sister he only recently found out he had, but is thrown into a battle for life. A huge challenge and learning opportunity for a twelve year old!
  • (5/5)
    The Pellinor series is still going strong. A really well written book with fantastic characters!
  • (4/5)
    I was quite disappointed to find this book wasn't about Maerad. I also found it quite hard to read some parts. I'm looking forward to the next one though!
  • (4/5)
    The Third book of Pellinor but not the last, it's the story of Maerad's brother Hem. His quest for a place in the world and a way to defeat the Hulls and their master. Very interesting in that Croggon doesn't shy away from showing the reality of war to the reader and the reality of being sucked into a cause.The framing device is a little clumsy but otherwise it's a good read.