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Icon of Evil: Hitler's Mufti and the Rise of Radical Islam

Icon of Evil: Hitler's Mufti and the Rise of Radical Islam


Icon of Evil: Hitler's Mufti and the Rise of Radical Islam

ratings:
4.5/5 (3 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jul 8, 2008
ISBN:
9781400176717
Format:
Audiobook

Description

In the 1920s, Hajj Amin-al-Husseini was the political and spiritual leader of the Palestinian Arabs. A vicious anti-Semite, he led numerous pogroms against Jewish settlers. During World War II, al-Husseini allied himself and his people with Hitler; he lived in Germany, met with Hitler, encouraged "the final solution," and became close friends with Himmler and other Nazis. After the war, al-Husseini escaped (he would certainly have been convicted at Nuremberg for war crimes) and fled to Egypt. His standing only rose, and in Egypt he was instrumental in fomenting Nazi-style anti-Semitic propaganda there. He also became the mentor to a new generation of radical "Islamo-fascist" Arab leaders. Foremost among them: Yasser Arafat.
Publisher:
Released:
Jul 8, 2008
ISBN:
9781400176717
Format:
Audiobook

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4.7
3 ratings / 2 Reviews
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  • (4/5)
    That Haj Amin al-Husseini, the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, was a bit of a psycho, is not (or should not) a matter of conjecture. The question is why his name is not more synonymous with the Holocaust.Dalin and Rothman set out to fix this situation but in a book somewhat shorter than I expected, really don't delve deeply into the life and times of the Grand Mufti, and fall into the trap of going to lengths to reinforce the Mufti's evilness (the man complained to German Gas Chamber operators that they weren't killing Jews quick enough, so I don't think we need reminding that he wasn't the most savoury of characters).While "Icon of Evil" might be useful as introduction to the world of Haj Amin al-Husseini, according to the Bibliography there are a multitude of sources that will give you a fuller view of the Mufti.
  • (5/5)
    This is a very readable and well documented account of the political career and legacy of Haj Amin al-Husseini, the influential mufti of Jerusalem who allied himself and the Arab cause to Nazi Germany. Escaping trial for war crimes, he returned to the Middle East and continued in the creation of today's radical Islam. A fairly brief book, I felt that it greatly enhanced my understanding of modern history.The book focuses on the mufti's political and polemical career, almost completely ignoring his private life except to note his fondness for luxury. Family members are mentioned only if they, like Yassar Arafat, were disciples of his vision. If he had a wife (or wives) and children, they are not mentioned here. The chief focus is on the Nazi years; one criticism that I have is that there is no explanation of why he went into eclipse in the 1960s.One comment, this is not a criticism, is that the book is written from a Jewish/Zionist point of view. This is not a secret, and I am not aware of any evidence that the authors have shaded the facts. It is rather in the tone of the work. One problem that I have in discussing the Arab-Israeli situation is that I can genuinely sympathize with both sides. I don't find it surprising that al-Husseini, and quite a few other Palestinians, were not enthralled with the prospect of massive immigration of Jews into Palestine with the subsequent formation of a Jewish state. What is unconscionable is how this became the excuse for mob violence, murder of opponents and a call for the extermination of all Jews throughout the world. As an atheist, I put al-Husseini on my list of people who prove that religion doesn't necessarily create moral people. I will never lose sympathy for Israel in the face of the rabid, and sometimes deranged accusations against Jews. I have not yet heard that Zionists have been accused of arranging the 2004 tsunami, but I won't be surprised if that's coming. There is a substantial section on the history of radical Islam, especially in Palestine, up to the present, including the continuing popularity of The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, the Blood Libel, Mein Kampf and Holocaust denial. The authors feel that this is all so obviously nonsense that they fail to examine the matter of whether or not Muslims, either the leadership or the average person, actually believe this. These ideas are spread by the governments, but do they actually believe it themselves, or is this a completely cynical manipulation of public opinion? A very worthwhile book.