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The Face on Your Plate: The Truth About Food

The Face on Your Plate: The Truth About Food


The Face on Your Plate: The Truth About Food

ratings:
4/5 (14 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Released:
Mar 16, 2009
ISBN:
9781423384243
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Somewhere in between Fast Food Nation and The Omnivore's Dilemma, between eating at McDonald's and killing a pig for dinner, there is a need for an audiobook that will probe more deeply and provide greater understanding and insight into the psychological factors that influence decisions about what we eat and why - and how these choices affect our lives, animals' lives, and the environment.
In this revelatory work, Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson, the best-selling author of When Elephants Weep, does just that, showing how food affects our moral selves, our health, and the environment. The Face on Your Plate raises questions that make us conscious of the decisions behind every bite we take:
How does the health of animals affect the health of our planet and of our bodies? What effect does eating animals have on our land, on our waters, and even on global warming? What are the results of farming practices - debeaking chickens and separating calves from their mothers - on animals and humans? As a psychoanalyst, Masson uniquely investigates how denial keeps us from recognizing the animal at the end of our fork - think pig, not bacon - and each culture's distinction among animals considered food and those that are forbidden.

The Face on Your Plate brings together Masson's intellectual, psychological, and emotional expertise over the last twenty years into the pivotal book of the food revolution. Anyone who wants to be open-eyed about their food choices - vegans, vegetarians, and meat eaters - will welcome this timely work.
Released:
Mar 16, 2009
ISBN:
9781423384243
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson is a former psychoanalyst who was, briefly, director of the Freud Archives. He has taught the history of psychoanalysis and journalistic ethics at the University of Toronto and the University of Michigan. At present he is an honorary research associate in the department of sociology at the University of Auckland, in New Zealand. He is the author of numerous books, most recentlyDogs Make Us Human, and bestselling books on animal emotions, including Dogs Never Lie About Love, When Elephants Weep, and The Dog Who Couldn't Stop Loving. @jeffreymmasson www.jeffreymasson.com


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What people think about The Face on Your Plate

4.1
14 ratings / 4 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (2/5)
    I always like it when someone clues me in about the truth of anything. That way I can be sure I'm not about to read something incredibly biased and selectively researched.Masson is a vegan. He wants you to be vegan, too. He thinks that this will solve a lot of the world's problems. He has a valid point. He, however, writes and documents the same way PETA does. PETA, in my opinion, has the right idea. They just go about it in the wrong way. Their cause is an important one, but unnecessarily misrepresenting facts does little to protect them from being labeled as completely nuts.I wrote a paper in college about the truthfulness of a statement made in the diet book Skinny Bitch. The claim was that milk leached calcium from bones. Now, whether or not that claim is true is irrelevant in my opinion. The authors of that book took that information directly from the PETA website who took it from an outdated, unreliable study. Masson does something similar.A full quarter of his book consists of end notes. He cites many different studies as he fleshes out his arguments. The trouble is, he frequently interjects his own opinions and unfounded claims into the text - often by piggybacking these claims onto something he's cited. That's not to say that the man should not be able to put forth his own opinion in his own book, it's just that his presentation is a bit misleading.That said, Masson does a decent job of explaining why folks should go vegan. He explains the health and environmental benefits. He spends a lot of time identifying animals as thinking, feeling, sentient beings who are being tortured and exploited by humans. He rambles in his prose and gets sidetracked fairly frequently, but you really get what he is saying. And you can tell that he really believes it, which helps.The biggest problem I had with his content was the lack of an explanation of why we sometimes label meat by its animal name (chicken, turkey) but rename others (beef, pork). As a psychoanalyst, I feel that he could have added some depth to this subject. In fact, the book jacket makes one think this will be addressed, as did his public radio spots. In reality, there isn't a lot in this book that one could not get from The Omnivore's Dilemma, which, in my opinion, is the better book.Masson's arguments really made me think and made me consider what I'm eating. If nothing else, he achieved that much.
  • (4/5)
    Well written, easy to read essay on the harm we humans do to animals. There were sections I wish the author would have spent more time with when talking about particular animals, and others (fish) where he spent too much time being detailed.
  • (3/5)
    The first few chapters were very informative, almost too informative, saturated with facts and research results. I also value the mid-section of the book with chapters about different animals and the practices around farming different species.
    The dilemma is ”the fave on your plate” (literally) is discussed towards the end of the book with/through the explanation of the psychological concept of denial.

    However, the very last part of the book sounded to me like an infomercial (a run through where to shop vegan, what to eat, a few plant-based cooking tips etc.), and shared from a point of a privileged, well-educated man who had the time and the means to afford all sorts of products that made it easy to follow the plant-based diet. Also, he contradicted himself encouraging the reader to shop locally, after which he suggested buying various imported sweeteners which, in his opinion, were healthier than white sugar. I felt that many of the author’s (health) claims seemed unsupported, very biased which he kind of ”warned” the reader about, but I somehow feel that he took too much liberty in the last chapter of the book and became a preaching voice.
  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Although the facts in this book were interesting, I liked this book a little less than other “foodie” books I’ve read this year. The author has a vegetarian agenda so the tone of the book gets preachy at times. There were some things I’d never thought about before, such as “stealing” honey from bees. I was also offended by a part of the book in which the author suggests that people should think above and beyond religious dicta. I would rather think through religious doctrine to see why foods the author wouldn’t eat are, in fact, okay to eat within my own religion. One part of the book, about farmed fish, was really horrifying. That chapter will certainly have me choosing wild fish over farmed fish if at all possible. It will not, however, stop me from going fishing myself and eating the fish I catch.One thing I particularly liked that the author suggested was the idea of “informed consent”. Why not let people know ahead of time what animals must endure prior your eating them? I don’t advocate PETA members accosting diners in restaurants, but I do think that information about the animal food industry should be made available to everyone. I also think that slaughterhouses and people within the meat industry should be more forthright and open about the process of raising animals to become food.The author also mentioned that it would be worthwhile to learn more about the individual species of animals that we do eat. If we understand animals more, we might decide to eat less of them.This book had its flaws, but overall it gave an interesting perspective of the food industry from a vegan/vegetarian perspective.

    1 person found this helpful