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Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451

Written by Kristi Hiner

Narrated by Tim Wheeler


Fahrenheit 451

Written by Kristi Hiner

Narrated by Tim Wheeler

ratings:
4/5 (481 ratings)
Length:
3 hours
Released:
Mar 16, 2011
ISBN:
9781611067163
Format:
Audiobook

Description

The CliffsNotes study guide on Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 supplements the original literary work, giving you background information about the author, an introduction to the work, a graphical character map, critical commentaries, expanded glossaries, and a comprehensive index, all for you to use as an educational tool that will allow you to better understand the work. This study guide was written with the assumption that you have read Fahrenheit 451. Reading a literary work doesn't mean that you immediately grasp the major themes and devices used by the author; this study guide will help supplement your reading to be sure you get all you can from Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451. CliffsNotes Review tests your comprehension of the original text and reinforces learning with questions and answers, practice projects, and more. For further information on Ray Bradbury and Fahrenheit 451, check out the CliffsNotes Resource Center at www.cliffsnotes.com.

IN THIS AUDIOBOOK

• Learn about the Life and Background of Ray Bradbury
• Hear an Introduction to Fahrenheit 451
• Explore themes, character development, and recurring images in the Critical Commentaries
• Learn new words from the Glossary at the end of each Chapter
• Examine in-depth Character Analyses
• Acquire an understanding of Paradise Fahrenheit 451 with Critical Essays
• Reinforce what you learn to further your study online at www.cliffsnotes.com
Released:
Mar 16, 2011
ISBN:
9781611067163
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Kristi Hiner is an English teacher at Wooster High School in Wooster, Ohio, where she also serves as the school newspaper advisor.



Reviews

What people think about Fahrenheit 451

4.1
481 ratings / 421 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    541 Fahrenheit Ray Bradbury (1953)

    It had been written that this book stands alongside such books as "1984" (1949) and "The Brave New World" (1932).

    I could not disagree more with that statement. In my opinion this book doesn't compare to those novels even slightly in the significant impact felt upon completion of novel. This book left me disappointed.

    "It was a pleasure to burn."

    A world where firemen create fires instead of putting out fires. Burning books and leaving ruins of history behind. When a woman wanted to burn with her books, Montag becomes uncomfortable with his job as fireman. He begins to take books home and marvels at the contents. Ultimately, it's The Bible, that survives the carnage to his own home after his deception is uncovered. He thought he could make a copy before he was discovered.

    Montag eventually goes on the run to escape when it's discovered he's been hiding books. I appreciate the authors desire to illustrate the importance of books or rather knowledge. The story initially gained my interest with this dystopian world but finally became a bore to me and just plain disjointed. The ending was rather disappointing for me.
  • (4/5)
    I saw the movie first in a big-screen theatre, 1966 (directed by François Truffaut, starring Julie Christie as Claisse). Recently I came across a 1971 edition of F-451, and figured it was time to read what Bradbury wrote, rather than a screenplay version. I was destined for disappointment! The storyline is amazing and I have enjoyed other of RB's novels, but the technologically-advanced society in the movie brought the story to a reality that I couldn't grasp by just reading the book. The movie version of the story gets a 5-star rating. I admit I was perhaps unduly influenced by watching rather than reading this novel. Usually I prefer the book, but the movie deviated so much I didn't entirely recognize the characters in the written version. Caveat emptor!
  • (5/5)
    in most of the previous reviews, it seems that the readers have missed a few things. bradbury says the work is "not about censorship." He's right. When Fire Chief Beatty brings Montag to his home, the living room is lined with hundreds of books. "It is not the ownership of books that is against the law," he says. "It is the reading of them."Also, the city was not destroyed by atomic bombs. If it were, surely Montag and his walking books couldn't have survived close enought to watch the destruction, and they did. I suggest this future world has zappers (lasars/solar rays, whatever).the book is a solid classic for our time because so much of what it presents to us has come true. Clarisse says she doesn't hang around with kids because "they are mean. At school, kids are killing kids."Now THAT paragraph alone shouild send cills up anyone's back who saw Columbine, and the D.C. shootings.There's something wrong with the world protrayed in the book; the wrongness is on every page and shows with most of the people. I know a few Millies and Beattys. I don't know enough Montags or Fabers.Bradbury went futher with at least two characters -- Beatty and the girl Clarisse -- when he wrote the play and the screenplays for the story. I wish he'd add that material to the book, but it's his copyright!
  • (5/5)
    Save me a lot of time, haha. Thanks a bunch.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed the concept and I can see how different it might've been when it was first published. The writing is solid and I love how it forces readers to think how a society would be if people do not stand up for what is right and good.
  • (5/5)
    Fahrenheit 451 is Bradbury's warning of what the future could possibly hold. He saw the possibility of a society in which our lives are consumed with mindless entertainment through tv and other forms of media that books have no place in our lives. In Bradbury's future world, it actually becomes illegal to own books. If discovered, firemen, who no longer put out fires but start them, race to your home to destroy both books and homes with fire. Fahrenheit 451 is, presumably, the temperature at which paper will catch fire and burn. Bradbury had incredible insight about the dangers of mindless entertainment, that prevented people from actually thinking life. Rather, we are constantly inundated with shallow information that creates a numb, non-thinking society. Although written about 65 years ago, I found it incredibly relevant in today's culture, with not only reality tv (and most everything else on television), but also social media and smart phones. The book is pretty easy to read after you get oriented to what's going on, and it's a real page-turner. Although the book is pretty brief, the character development of the lead character, Guy Montag, (and a couple others) is pretty fascinating. Highly recommended book that is both entertaining and thought-provoking.