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UnavailableXenocide: Volume Three of the Ender Quintet
Currently unavailable on Scribd

Xenocide: Volume Three of the Ender Quintet


Currently unavailable on Scribd

Xenocide: Volume Three of the Ender Quintet

ratings:
3.5/5 (52 ratings)
Length:
20 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 1, 2004
ISBN:
9781593974794
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Xenocide is the third installment of the Ender series. On Lusitania, Ender found a world where humans and pequeninos and the Hive Queen could all live together; where three very different intelligent species could find common ground at last. Or so he thought. But Lusitania also harbors the descolada, a virus which kills all humans it infects, but which the pequeninos require in order to transform into adults.

The Starways Congress so fears the effect of the descolada, should it escape from Lusitania, that they have ordered the destruction of the entire planet and all who live there. The Fleet is on its way and a second Xenocide seems inevitable, until the Fleet vanishes.

A Macmillan Audio production.

Publisher:
Released:
Aug 1, 2004
ISBN:
9781593974794
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Orson Scott Card has won several Hugo and Nebula Awards for his works of speculative fiction, among them the Ender series and The Tales of Alvin Maker. He lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife and four children.


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Reviews

What people think about Xenocide

3.6
52 ratings / 58 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Hard to rate, I discovered the Enderverse in the late nineties and devoured them in quick succession. It's impossible to rate each individual volume in the series because in my memory they form a whole and each individual book is just a part of the story. I probably would have to say the Speaker trilogy ((Speaker for the Dead and its two sequels Xenocide and Children of the Mind) were my favorite. I felt like a teenager again contemplating the mysteries of the universe again. It was a glorious feeling to recapture and for that reason alone I would give it 5 stars.
  • (3/5)
    Meh, I appreciate the ideas here, I really do. But all that was interesting about Ender, Valentine and even the pequeninos is made cardboard for the sake of philosophical discussion. I really like the continuing themes of what is alien and what is not, and even what is god and what is not. I am less than thrilled with the plastic interactions of the characters discussing those themes. Not sure I have the stamina for the next one...
  • (4/5)
    I've been devouring the ender series over the last weeks, and enjoying my time with it quite a bit. It has a very smart story and handles a lot of interesting topics very well. This book was no exception to that.

    The fundamental issues that are the topic of this book are interesting and well-written. The characters are also very well written, and the dialogues at the beginning of the chapter that have become standard for the series are also interesting, especially due to their perspective (I'll refrain from talking more about that, as it would probably qualify as a spoiler).

    All in all, I have enjoyed the biggest part of the book a lot, and was considering a five-star-rating, until almost at the very end, there was a moment that, to me, was too much of a deus ex machina. It did not quite ruin the book to me, but it was a bit far-fetched and did not fit into my understanding of the ender universe, which was, for the most part, very realistic (if you disregard things like near-lightspeed travel and instantaneous communication, which are at least somewhat explained).

    So, only four stars, and I'm interested in how the next and final book pans out.
  • (3/5)
    I still like the basic story and characters, so I did enjoy this book, but I found myself annoyed at two things. First, the way that all the unsolvable problems were all almost completely solved within the last 100 pages seemed beyond implausible. I am a fan of Star Trek, so I am used to science being stretched beyond the breaking point of plausibility, but that brings me to my second gripe. Card spends an interminable amount of time with characters extensively exploring the philosophy and scientific minutiae that supposedly support the technology developed and used, all the while leaving the scientifically literate reader disappointed. If science can't support something in a story, then don't spend pages and pages and pages trying to justify it, just do it, and make up some brief, magical explanations. Had this been done, the book would likely have come in at a more reasonable 300 pages or so.
  • (4/5)
    I don't know how to feel about this book. The problems it set up, the conflicts it presented, the questions it raised, the people it introduced...they were all brilliant and fascinating and thoroughly engrossing. Riveting, mind-expanding, so many delicious adjectives. Five-star adjectives, without question. Diverse, real, complex characters that deal with problems every bit as grand. But then...everything just got tied up with such infuriating neatness. Deus ex machina that couldn't get more blatant if Zeus himself had descended from Olympus and manipulated things to their neat ends. All of the most crucial solutions - in addition to what will surely be the backbone of sequels - quite literally conjured out of nothingness. In fact, one could probably argue that things were tied up quickly and neatly in order to make way for the hastily-introduced seeds of the coming conflict.I can't give it less than four stars because the majority of this book was just so strong, and the people you're introduced to, and the added depth to those you already knew, are entirely worth the journey. But the conclusions did little justice to the myriad complexities and richness of the problems that they solved. And that makes me sad. I'll just say that if you find yourself skimming once you hit 450 or 500, and completely giving up around 550...I'm not gonna argue with how you choose to spend your time.All the same, this book and the people, peoples, and problems it introduced me to will remain with me long after I've forgotten how it ended. I loved this book. I just wish it could have had the conclusion it deserved.
  • (5/5)
    My copy is folded and bent and loved and read four times.
  • (3/5)
    This book asks and further examines the difficulties for species survive together.
  • (3/5)
    This book asks and further examines the difficulties for species survive together.
  • (3/5)
    While the majority of this book was as intriguing as ever in its exploration of ethics and personalities, the deus ex machina that tied it all together definitely did not work for me. Yet this is only the third book in the Ender Quintet. Should I continue, or should I try something else by Card? He certainly seems prolific.
  • (4/5)
    Some curious and very creative ideas. Diving into the second half (Book four - Children of the Mind) I want to see where he takes it!
  • (4/5)
    Continue to be drawn into this series...The writing is great. The concepts quite interesting. I have only one issue and that relates to the plot twist near the end...My hope is that this is "fixed" in the next book but that is just me.Great story that I should have read a long time ago!
  • (3/5)
    Could not finish it. Very philosophical, less action than in previous books.
  • (3/5)
    What stayed with me from this book was Han Qing-jao's test to see if she was godtouched.
  • (4/5)
    This installment is fascinating for its study of the characters. Both of the alien species, the humans, and the computer become complex and real. Other worlds are developed to very good levels and it keeps you turning the pages.
  • (4/5)
    I need to rethink rereading some of my favorite books from my teenage years and simply let the past remain in the past. Ender's Game and Speaker for the Dead hold up well over time, but then Ender's story devolves from there into ridiculousness.The last two books are an exercise in moral tedium without an intriguing plot.I read Xenocide for the first time nearly two decades ago and upon finishing it I distinctly remember not caring enough to pick up the next book, the series conclusion Children of the Mind. I mean, Xenocide leaves you hanging with a fleet of starships heading towards Ender and crew to destroy the entire planet(!), and I still didn't bother to find out how it ended, at least not for several years. Curiously, I followed a similar pattern while reading Card's Shadow series.The side narrative about Qing-jao, the people of Path and the Starways Congress was interesting, but that's about it.
  • (4/5)
    This installment is fascinating for its study of the characters. Both of the alien species, the humans, and the computer become complex and real. Other worlds are developed to very good levels and it keeps you turning the pages.
  • (4/5)
    Xenocide is the third book in the Ender's Game series and explores the increasing risk to Lusitania, a planet housing the only other two sentient species in the galaxy, along with a virus that would kill every human if it could. The book starts in space as Ender's sister travels to Lusitania to see her brother. It also reaches far away to a planet called Path, where certain citizens are touched by God, which causes them to be both incredibly smart and also servants to brutal OCD symptoms. Card somehow brings this all together into a really interesting mix, at times having the two non-human sentient species talk to each other. A good book and I'm looking forward to what happens next.
  • (5/5)
    Great continuation of Ender's story. I'm not sure I buy all the Metaphysical stuff. But it kept me wanting to see what would happen next.
  • (3/5)
    TOO LONG. I grudgingly give this book a 3, based only on my affection for the characters and the creativity of the story. Most of the book suffers from overkill in one sense or another, which leads to its main problem of length. It´s impossible to deny that Card is brilliant, but I can think of no writers other than Dickens (barely) and presumably Tolstoy (although I have yet to read him) who can justifiably write 600 or more pages of novel. Yes I'm aware I'm including Dostoyevsky in this statement (sorry Karamazov-lovers). Card could have brought this one in at under 500 and lost nothing while gaining much due to brevity.

    Problems (where to start?):

    Much of the length problem was due to tedious treatment of 3 of the main characters. Miro -- look, I get that he doesn´t like being paralyzed and that he´s wallowing in self-pity. You can cut at least 10 pages of his wallowing and I will still understand it. His transformation at the end will still be impactful.

    Si Wang-Mu -- the introduction of Path and the gradual revelation of OCD was masterful. What I needed much less of was the hammering home of their inner turmoil over the gods. There´s a specific 5 page passage starting on 430 that as far as I can tell is used solely for Wang-Mu to ponder the nature of godhood. If you´re going to spend 5 pages on her, at least use it to develop the mind-boggling and completely inexplicable split-second decision she makes at the end to run off with New Peter.

    Quara -- I did not swallow this character for one instant. Besides the ridiculous lapse in logic that she´s prepared to wipe out 2 species (including her own) so as not to kill 1 species, I´m supposed to believe that she´s defending Descolada just to get back at her family? And this is the first sign of mental instability that she´s shown in 30 years? Ender couldn´t have "healed" her in all that time (Is he a demi-god with supernatural powers of healing as shown in Speaker for the Dead or isn´t he?)? And then in all the arguments they had with her, no one could have raised the point that a dying Piggy raises at the very end: even if Descolada is a sentient being, it is a murderous and tyrannous one, and we have the right to defend ourselves. This woman is simply insane, and I do not believe that she would have been allowed to affect so much of the goings-on if Card were trying to be at all realistic. She was used to create conflict in an already uber-conflictive book, and guess what -- not necessary! That´s almost 30 pages saved right there. Did anyone else catch the part where she was passing Ela´s defense work to the virus itself? Mentioned but never follwed up on.

    My other objections are less grave. There´s the dialogue style, just as present in Speaker and to a lesser extent in Ender´s, where every character is constantly psychoanalyzing every other, and everything they say can be decoded to show a deep personal insight. Although it worked without overtly bothering me in the first two books it got to be too much in this one (perhaps due to the length). People don´t actually talk like this, or if they do I´ve never met them. It´s not natural and became intrusive to my reading experience. There was a bizarre narration sequence on page 100 where Card suddenly addresses the reader in the 2nd person -- jarring to say the least. Finally, there was the arrival of young Val and New Peter at the end, which I just thought was unnecessary. There was already PLENTY going on in this novel, why add more complication out of the blue?

    This is one of my longest reviews because this book was very frustrating to me. It was frustrating because there were so many really good things about it (mainly plot and the ethical/geo-political dilemmas), but some really bad ones as well.
  • (3/5)

    I have been reading the Ender and Bean series because I started them long ago and I am a completeist. I finished the Bean series and then I read Speaker for the Dead and Xenocide, so I'd be reading in terms of internal chronology. The Bean series I liked just fine as what they are--action sci-fi. The Ender series are something else entirely.

    I love Ender's Game. I've read it several times and each time I have the same emotional response to it. It's a book I'm happy to say is a favorite. But the sad truth is, the series as a whole suffers from what I have dubbed "Amber Spyglass syndrome". You know, the first book is amazing, and you can't wait to read the rest of the series. And then the second book isn't exactly what you expected, and you're not sure you entirely trust where the author is going, but surely the third book will be great. And then you read the third book and you are totally disappointed and a little bit stabby because good GRIEF, it's nothing but opinions and philosophy with a very thin veneer of story over it and moreover, the characters you've grown to love are just gone.

    *takes a deep breath*

    So that's what I see going on with Xenocide. Card has substituted philosophy for story and the result is an odd and unsatisfying book. I appreciate the difficulties Card is facing in terms of trying to write science fiction as a person of faith. But as someone who is also religious, I also really dislike what he does here, just as much as I dislike what Pullman does in Amber Spyglass. It's not even good science fiction--the solution to the problem is some alchemical combination of magic and religion and philosophy. It's a solution to f-t-l travel, and so it takes on a classic sci-fi problem, but in a way that I--not at all a scientist--found both aggravating and suspect.

    Moreover, I felt distanced from Ender, which I never have before. I never necessarily liked or agreed with all his actions and stances, but I always cared for him. Xenocide's Ender is not the Ender I cared about. The characters even refer to him mostly as Andrew, which doesn't help.

    So it's frustrating and I now have to decide whether to go on, if I should finish the series or give the whole thing up as a bad job. It's a tough call and I haven't made it yet. But I know that I'm annoyed with the moralizing and philosophy masquerading as story.

    Book source: public library

    Book information: 1996, Tor; adult science fiction (YA crossover)

  • (4/5)
    The last time I read this book I remember walking away from it with such awe. I loved the ideas that Card presented regarding the lives of the aliens and the philosophical struggles that were encountered.

    This time however, I was a little disappointed. I knew what to expect and I knew I loved it, but it just wasn't the same. Maybe it was because of how the science behind the most important plot points were explained but I was disappointed.

    Another thing that bothered me was the two random story lines of Ender and the people of Path. It seemed that there were two separate stories period. And as it turns out there were. Card confessed that he had the idea of Path already set to be a different story but then decided to write another Ender book and so used what he had... So that was disappointing.

    Anywho, this is still a good book and definitely worth a read. Just don't expect to be fooled by the science and do expect to have your personal philosophical ideals tested.
  • (3/5)
    This was a good continuation of the Ender series. Fortunately, Card employs the recap function of many series writers, something I usually hate, but because it has been a few years since I read the previous book, I wasn't too lost.

    Overall it was pretty slow. There is some action, but it's very philosophically based. While I like that, there comes a point where I get tired of hearing character's thoughts and would much rather they interacted with each other more. I have the show me don't tell me syndrome. I'm also now very used to Heinlein's style of writing, which is almost exclusively dialogue.

    The end made very little sense to me. Without putting any spoilers in here I thought the ending was far less self-containing. I suppose I forgot there was another one after it. On to Children of the Mind!
  • (1/5)
    In my memory, this stands out as being the most poorly edited finished book I have ever read. It's an unfortunate distinction. Xenocide is so riddled with typos, internal contradictions, and mangled sentences that I couldn't concentrate on the plot. I ended up getting out a marker and correcting as I went, and when I was finished, I threw out the book. In the trash. With great satisfaction.
  • (4/5)
    well... to answer the questions below:- Going back to Speaker for the Dead, why did Jane cut the communications between Lusitania Fleet and Congress, if she knew - or couldn't possibly ignore - that this act would ultimately lead to her own destruction? -She did know that this act would lead to her being "Found" by someone. She had a long conversation with Val, Ender, and Miro about this act and she determined that it was the only course of action that might save the planet and piggies. Then Starways Congress actually sent the kill order to the fleet to use the MD device on the planet, she had to cut off communications before the fleet received this message.- Why doesn't Jane, this all-knowing, practically almighty IA, just hire a serial killer to get rid of Qing-jao? Why doesn't she take control of any computer-controlled device (cars, university equipment, whatever) to make her death pass as an accident? Why, at least, doesn't she alter slightly the message sent by Qing-jao to Congress, so that neither she nor Congress would ever detect the fraud? -Jane explained, in chapter 5, that she doesn't know anything about human nature, she can only see what is entered into a computer. If you ask her about someone, she will give you the vitals of that person, she doesn't understand how each person in the hundred worlds acts and thinks. So how can she even find a "Serial Killer", its not like they post on computer networks that they killed 15 people and are looking for a new one to kill. She cannot find a killer.- And why, more fundamentally, doesn't Jane just blow up this bloody Lusitania Fleet? Causing an accident by tampering in the computer of a few ships cruising near light speed should not be THAT difficult, nor forging a false report pretending there was an insurrection on board or whatever - did not Ockham's Razor law command to explore those possibilities, instead of concentrating so much energy on the unlikely attempt to discover a way to travel faster than light? -Jane stated in the beginning of the book that she has no control over machine, she is not "IN" machines she is the "COMMUNICATION" between all machines. Therefore, she cannot cause the destruction of the star fleet.- Finally, knowing how dangerous the "new" Peter is, why doesn't Ender just get rid of him, instead of allowing him to wander freely in the universe and institute himself as a new Hegemon? For a man having committed xenocide twice (buggers & descolada), is the killing of only ONE pseudo-clone so difficult? And why doesn't Jane, arguably so wise and having had all the time the study the life of the real Peter, see the danger which represents his new avatar? -Ender cannot just get rid of the new Peter. Ender will for the rest of his life feel as though the Xenocide of the Buggers was his fault, therefore he refuses to take another life or cause the death of a life. He had to be forced to take the life of Human (the piggie) and he only did it so that Human could pass into the third life. Ender will never again cause the destruction of any life form no matter how evil they are.
  • (3/5)
    WARNING: Spoilers ahead!I am quite divided about this book.On the one hand, the book is rich with original, thought-provoking ideas, like the two first in Ender's Quartet. One of the ideas which most struck me was the moral question under which conditions it would be justified to annihilate another sentient species. Most of the books is devoted to the debate on this topic between Quara (being of the opinion that EVERY sentient species has an absolute right to live) and Ender (being of the opinion that only if the other sentient species is able to communicate with mankind and able to reach a deal with it not to destroy each other, it has a right to live).I also very much appreciated the reflection on the question of free will applied to IA : Jane is doubting that she is alive, because she is just a (very sophisticated) computer program, unable to accomplish anything without cause. But cannot the same be said of human beings?On the other hand, the plots contains imho some crucial deficiencies which make it hard to believe (and I do not even refer to the deus ex machina of faster-than-light-travel-through-wishful-thinking or all this pseudo-philosophical babble about philotes). Let me mention briefly the following questions :- Going back to Speaker for the Dead, why did Jane cut the communications between Lusitania Fleet and Congress, if she knew - or couldn't possibly ignore - that this act would ultimately lead to her own destruction?- Why doesn't Jane, this all-knowing, practically almighty IA, just hire a serial killer to get rid of Qing-jao? Why doesn't she take control of any computer-controlled device (cars, university equipment, whatever) to make her death pass as an accident? Why, at least, doesn't she alter slightly the message sent by Qing-jao to Congress, so that neither she nor Congress would ever detect the fraud?- And why, more fundamentally, doesn't Jane just blow up this bloody Lusitania Fleet? Causing an accident by tampering in the computer of a few ships cruising near light speed should not be THAT difficult, nor forging a false report pretending there was an insurrection on board or whatever - did not Ockham's Razor law command to explore those possibilities, instead of concentrating so much energy on the unlikely attempt to discover a way to travel faster than light?- Finally, knowing how dangerous the "new" Peter is, why doesn't Ender just get rid of him, instead of allowing him to wander freely in the universe and institute himself as a new Hegemon? For a man having committed xenocide twice (buggers & descolada), is the killing of only ONE pseudo-clone so difficult? And why doesn't Jane, arguably so wise and having had all the time the study the life of the real Peter, see the danger which represents his new avatar?Fortunately, these inconsistencies did not prevent me from finishing and even enjoying this book, but make me seriously wonder whether I'll turn soon to the last part of the Quartet.
  • (3/5)
    Ender's saga, 3000 years later. Good story and there are several parallels with current life, displaced by the mind of the author.
  • (5/5)
    Not sure why this book doesn't get as good a rep as Speaker for the Dead or Ender's game. I didn't love the ending, but it sets up things for the next book, which gets you thinking more about those events in a deeper, connected sort of way. But Xenocide truly riveted me. This was an example of Card using philosophy and conflict at his highest level. So much going on in this book. If you like philosophy and conflict (and not in a boring way either) you will love this. If you don't, well, you're missing out.
  • (3/5)
    Admittedly, it would have been hard for anything to live up to "Speaker for the Dead" (which, despite the impression it made on me, I still gave a rather stingy four stars), and unfortunately, "Xenocide" didn't do it. Although it's the longest book in the Ender Wiggin saga, it's a book in which it doesn't feel as if a lot actually happens. The characters spend most of their time arguing ideas, albeit ideas that do relate to what's happening in the plot. Although one of the things I admire most about Orson Scott Card's writing is his character development, this book is so "talky" that it feels as if many of the characters are reduced to talking heads for certain opinions. Even the world of Path, which held my fascination initially because of the way its people revered those with OCD as "god-spoken," didn't feel as if it fully "clicked" with the rest of the story, but rather simply ran parallel to it. Characters seemed to over-react to some things (Novenha blaming Ender for things he couldn't really control), while they under-reacted to others (a major character's death seemed mere fodder for advancing the plot, and not a real loss to those who loved him; another character changed his opinion so drastically and quickly in the face of new information that it stretched the bounds of believability.) Still, the end of the book brought about some interesting developments that still make me eager to read the next installment.
  • (5/5)
    Interesting book though a bit confusing and if you didn't read the 1st two books you wouldn't understand what was happening at all. Has an unexpected twist at the end and is a slow read.
  • (4/5)
    The ever travelling Ender has finally found his roots and settled on the colony planet of Lusitania. Humans are not the only sentient species on this world. For the first time in human history, we find humans trying to live in world where they are not the only intelligent species. Piggies and buggers make up the trio of Lusitania's population. Arguably, the Descolada can be named the fourth member of this family as throughout the book, the moral dilemma of the story is what each species is willing to do with the threat of extinction at their doorstep.Externally, you have the Starways Congress looming ever closer with the ability to blow the entire planet to kingdom come and internally the threat of Descolada threatens to genetically destroy everything in comes in contact with.Humans, Buggers and Piggies, must find a way to either work together to fight against both sources of death, or they will end up fighting one other to death.