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The Hound of the Baskervilles

The Hound of the Baskervilles

Written by Arthur Conan Doyle

Narrated by David Timson


The Hound of the Baskervilles

Written by Arthur Conan Doyle

Narrated by David Timson

ratings:
4.5/5 (124 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Released:
Aug 1, 2004
ISBN:
9789629545147
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

The award-winning Sherlock Holmes narrator David Timson leads us through Conan Doyle’s most famous tale. This extended story brings the archetypal detective to the moors with his friend and biographer Dr Watson to investigate the mystery of a beast terrorising the neighbourhood.
Released:
Aug 1, 2004
ISBN:
9789629545147
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930) practiced medicine in the resort town of Southsea, England, and wrote stories while waiting for his patients to arrive. In 1886, he created two of the greatest fictional characters of all time: the detective Sherlock Holmes and his partner, Dr. Watson. Over the course of four novels and fifty-six short stories, Conan Doyle set a standard for crime fiction that has yet to be surpassed.


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Reviews

What people think about The Hound of the Baskervilles

4.3
124 ratings / 80 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    I found it a splendid reading in every way
  • (5/5)
    Great way to keep occupied. I'd recommend listening very intenty.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorites that has been redone for both tv series and was glad to see that the original was just as intriguing and haunting.
  • (5/5)
    This audio book has been done very well. It enhanced the hooking narratives of the author by good articulation, emphasis and occasional background music. Dr.Watson's voice over was excellent.
  • (5/5)
    great narration. classic story. worth a listen.. ... ... ..
  • (5/5)
    Ever get a chill watching a movie or show, or reading a book your really into, well I experienced that several times listen to the story of the great hound of the Baskervilles. it'a a great listen and i would definitly recommend it to others who are fans of the great consulting dective.
  • (5/5)
    I read this before when I was younger, so none of it was exactly surprising to me. It's better than the other two Holmes novels I've read: the structure is better, that is to say, although I also enjoyed the story a little more, probably because it's so iconic and because I remembered somewhat of what's supposed to be going on. Sherlock has less of a spotlight in this, I suppose, since Watson goes about on his own and investigates, but of course, it's Holmes that figures out everything at the end. I actually found the last chapter or so, the explanation, unnecessarily -- although that's probably because I've read it before, so I knew the significance of details like the boots.

    Like the other Holmes stories and novels, though, this is easy to read and fun and kinda hard to put down.
  • (3/5)
    I’ve read most of Holmes before, but somehow I hadn’t read this one. Atmospheric, creepy, and marvellous. [June 2010]
  • (4/5)
    This was a super fun read. I was looking for something a little lighter to read and this definitely fit the bill!
  • (4/5)
    A classic tale which never gets old, this short novel has something for everyone. It's classic Sherlock Holmes, so there is a compelling mystery, great characters and wonderful atmosphere. From the rooms of 221B Baker Street, to the streets of London, to the misty Moor, the sense of time and place is masterfully evoked. There are clues to be discovered and the resolution to be explained to Dr Watson (and thus the reader!) in Holmes' inimitable style. Small wonder that Conan Doyle has influenced generations of mystery writers and that his tales of the great detective still resonate today.

    The audiobook was competently narrated by Simon Prebble. A small quibble I have is with his voice for Beryl Stapleton. Her "slight lisp" - as it is described in the text - came out as akin to the accent of Manuel in Fawlty Towers: somewhat distracting, but not fatal to enjoyment.

    This was a fun buddy read with my friend Jemidar. Highly recommended!
  • (5/5)
    Arthur Conan Doyle wrote "Hound of the Baskervilles" eight years after he'd killed Holmes in an attempt to abandon what he thought of as bullshit pop writing and an escape to more serious historical fiction, none of which we give a shit about today. We're all familiar with the belated sequel (*cough* George Lucas). (And he did charge double his usual price for its publication, knowing Holmes' popularity.) Furthermore, he wrote it together with one Fletcher Robinson, whose name reminds me of the awful John Fletcher, Shakespeare's protege, with whom Will wrote such terrible plays as Henry VIII and The Two Noble Kinsmen.

    So how surprising is it to we sequel-weary people that Hound of the Baskervilles totally kicks ass?

    But it does. Of the two Holmes novellas, this and "Study in Scarlet," Hound is obviously superior. It's perfectly plotted, and its Gothic theme meshes surprisingly well with Holmes' invincible rationality. It's a terrific book.
  • (3/5)
    _The Hound of the Baskervilles_ is probably one of the more famous cases of Sherlock Holmes and is also one of only four novel-length treatments of the cases of the great detective. It’s a solid story and is perhaps primarily of interest in the apparently supernatural element which lies at the heart of the case. Indeed this element of the tale, along with its ultimate resolution, is very interesting when viewed in the light of Doyle’s subsequent conversion to spiritualism and when looked at from this angle the numerous comments in the story about the credulous peasants who give credence to the supernatural gain a somewhat ironic lustre.

    I do think, however, that the story was far from the strongest of Doyle’s outings with his most famous creation. Its main failing lies primarily in the fact that the real draw of all of these stories is largely absent for the bulk of it: Sherlock Holmes himself. I wonder whether Conan Doyle was trying to keep his distance from the creation whose popularity he had begun to view with a growing ambivalence? As it is we do have the opportunity to see Watson acting on his own as Holmes’ agent which is of some interest, but I’m afraid that he doesn’t hold a candle to his confederate as a fully compelling character study. Stolid and not without resources as an investigator he may be, but there really is no substitute to the biting commentary and unique perspective of Holmes himself.

    I will avoid giving much of a plot outline, since it’s probably either already known or not desired due to the possibility of spoilers in the case. Suffice it to say that an apparently insoluble death leads our intrepid team to the foggy moors of England’s West Country where they not only hope to solve one death, but also to prevent another. Doyle goes all out in peppering the trail with utterly ambiguous clues and numerous strands and false leads until things can be brought to their ultimate and satisfying conclusion. I did learn one interesting tidbit: apparently as far as Dr. Watson is concerned it's ok to let an insane psychopath go free as long as he will leave England and only be a burden and a danger to the people of South America. Nice one, doc.
  • (5/5)
    Audiobook. Very good and interesting mystery. The narration was very well done too. I liked listening to the story rather than reading it since I tend to get lost and forget what happened in the written Sherlock Holmes books.
  • (2/5)
    My first Sherlock Holmes; I want to read more just because I'm sure there must be better ones.
  • (4/5)
    Hound is pure Gothic goodness, with the moors, and mysterious lights, and noises, and danger everywhere. When people talk about life having passed at a slower pace in the past, they could have been talking about this book. A doctor comes to see Holmes about his concern, and over a few days of meetings over meals and slow chases, we get the set-up. Then Watson sets off for an extended stay with the new baronet. The two of them potter about in the country going on lots of long walks and being creeped out half the time. Eventually all is resolved, but apparently Watson doesn't get the final story from Holmes until much later. Leisurely. Plenty of time for Baskerville to fall in love in a non-ridiculous sort of way.

    A fun read, with lots of red herrings strewn about.
  • (3/5)
    I have seen several movie versions of this story, but the actual written word surpasses the visual presentation. Doyle is a master of description of character and setting. He sets the mood for that great hound to come charging into the moor. The women are minor characters in the majority of the stories, but they hold a few trump cards. I like the way Dr Watson unfolds the story and summarizes the deeds. Watson stands like a celebrated barrister and presents the case.
  • (3/5)
    My least favorite (so far) of Doyle's works. It seems a bit more forced than the other stories. I believe it may have been padded to create something more significant than his short stories.
  • (4/5)
    Perhaps the most popular of all Sherlock Holmes stories, The Hound of the Baskervilles combines the traditional detective tale with elements of horror. When Sir Charles Baskerville is found dead on the wild Devon moorland with the footprints of a giant hound nearby, the blame is placed on a family curse-and it is up to Holmes and Watson to solve the mystery of the legend. Rationalism is pitted against the supernatural and good against evil, as Sherlock Holmes tries to defeat a foe almost his equal.
  • (4/5)
    The Hound of the Baskervilles is one of Sir Arthur Conan's best detective novels. As he wrote this in the time period where Gothic novels were prominent, it is not the usual detective novel, but with a supernatural twist. When Sherlock Holmes is asked to investigate the mysterious curse which has plagued the Baskerville family for years, he finds himself in the midst of a dilemma. This novel is recommended for all fans of Sherlock Holmes and gothic fiction.
  • (4/5)
    This was my first Sherlock Holmes story and I ended up enjoying reading this even though. Had to restart it after halfway through. I apparently read through too fast and got lost in the story and felt that to better appreciate what we have been given in this masterful mystery. I felt that this decision helped establish the characters better and helped me figure out some of the mystery before it came upon us. I'll definitely be reading more, probably starting at book one for a change.
  • (4/5)
    this astonishing book is about a myth of a hound that kills but a mean and sellfish person named Jack made it come true. Everyone in Baskerville Hall is scared to look for the hound and see what they would find, whether the sight isd too scary for them and they don't want to say anything or the hound eats them alive. Sherlock Holes and Mr. watson came from scottland so that they could find out who is holding the hound and how it only kills at night. when they find out that Sir Henry is comming to inherit what his fatyher left, like Baskerville Hall, Sherlock holmes looks through his years of life, and finds out that he has another brother and the girl he wants to get engaged to is actually his so called brothers wife, even though they pretended that they were brother and sister. so that is why jack wants to kill Sir Henry, because Jack would be next to inherit all of his fathers fortunes.
  • (3/5)
    This was my first Sherlock Holmes book and I wasn't too impressed. I thought Holmes was just really mean, and Watson was too meek. Holmes barely appeared at all in this book and it consisted mostly of Watson's letters to him. The story was interesting enough, but I never at any point was confused as to who the villain of the story was. I was hoping this story would include a mystery that was nearly impossible to solve, but that wasn't the case at all. A real disappointment.
  • (5/5)
    It's been a very long time since I read any of the Sherlock Holmes stories, I think I was still in grade school, and now I'm going to have to go back and read them all, just such enjoyable reading. I was surprised at how it can still bring you to the edge of your seat.
  • (4/5)
    Sherlock Holmes is HOT right now. Between the Robert Downey Jr. interpretation, the Masterpiece Classic episodes, the books for kids, the House of Silk, A Study in Sherlock, just to name a few examples, we are showered in Sherlock. Despite all of this exposure I had never read an actual Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes novel. A few months ago I read the House of Silk, a Sherlock Homes novel, although not written by Conan Doyle but authorized by his estate. I thoroughly enjoyed it. Then while reading the Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, another lovely book by the way, the main character references the Hound of the Baskervilles. I read quite a few Agatha Christie novels and I was interested to see how Conan Doyles master detective would stand up to the Queen of Crime so with that in mind I embarked on my first ever Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes novel.The story takes place on the Moors of England at the Baskerville estate. The old heir has just died by somewhat mysterious circumstances and the new heir is set to take over. There is a curse on the family having to do with an ancestor who kidnapped a yeoman's daughter. She escaped and was pursued by the not so nice ancestor. When both were found, the girl and the ancestor were dead with a large hound standing over them. Since that day the Hound of the Baskervilles is said to plaque the generations of the Baskerville family. It looks like the new heir is in danger and if that's not bad enough there is a serial killer on the loose. Holmes and Watson are called in to take a look at the case of course solve it in due course.The resolution of the mystery was not a very complicated one. I find the Agatha Christie novels to be far more clever in their solutions. That said, it was still a very enjoyable novel. I loved the description of the creepy moor. It was a character unto itself. My favorite part of the book was when Watson was asked to present a certain theory to Holmes. Watson goes into great detail and he feels pleased with his deductions when Holmes seems to agree with his conclusions. Holmes soon bursts his bubble when he informs Watson that he just wanted to see what a lay person would think. Holmes then proceeds to lay out what really happened which is nothing like Watson thought. Very funny stuff.This a classic story that I think everyone should read at least once since it is referred to quite often. I am not sure when I will visit Holmes again as I have quite a few Christies on my TBR pile. However I am certain Holmes and I will meet again.
  • (5/5)
    This was the first "Sherlock Holmes" book that I had ever read. It was very good and interesting; quick and witty dialogue fast-paced, etc. My only complaint was that it did begin to drag near the end. I will definitely read another of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's detective stories!
  • (4/5)
    audiobook from the library - The narrator of this book was SO difficult to listen to, but I made it through. The only thing more painful than his 1930s British high society accent was his fake 1930s American/Canadian accent. The story itself was good, but of course I more or less knew the plot already (thank you, Wishbone)
  • (3/5)
    This book is the last story of the series of Holmes. The story is about a person inerited a heritage at a very remote old manor. The ex-owner was dead not clearly in a corner of his house, and it seems that he was really scared before he dead. So people here all believed that there was a ghoset that becamed of a woman which dead because of the family of that ex-owner. So, the person who got the heritage asked Holmes to solve this thing. Final,Holmes found it's just a dog. Because one relative wanted to get the manor, so he creat all these things to try to kill the owner of this manor.It's hard for me to read this book because I always scared about these horror stories. That's why I have to finish this story one time. For me, The first part of this story is good and really attracted me, but as the story developed, it became a liitle farfetched,I mean, all of these is just came from a dog? Anyway, Holmes was a really good detective!
  • (4/5)
    I wanted to join in some of the challenge reads for October, but the horror genre is not for me. However, this old classic was just spooky enough – the atmospheric moor, with its swamp, and chill, and fog; the hound and its legend; the sinister designs on the house of Baskerville – all combined to make a great murder mystery.
  • (3/5)
    "The Hound of the Baskervilles" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is quite the adventure for any mystery fans out there. The horrible howling of the hound is heard across the Moore, and all the while the family of Baskervilles falls off one by one, becoming victims of the superstitions of the the tale of the hound. The witty pair, Watson and Holmes, take the reader on a very investigative journey that leads them down many paths, all of which fall to great horrors and surprises. This book will astound you as you try to uncover the mystery of the hound of the Baskervilles.
  • (5/5)
    I’ve always been a huge fan of Sherlock Holmes stories. They never fail to make me think and usually laugh. I’ve read collections, individual mysteries and I’ve even seen a play version that combines a couple tales. I was pretty sure I read this one in junior high, but I wasn’t positive, so I knew it was time to remedy that. The Hound of the Baskerville is everything you want in Sherlock tale; great problem, clever quips, brilliant detective, etc. A wealthy family has been haunted by tales a vicious, unearthly hound for years. Legend has it one of their ancestors was killed by the beast. When the current head of the family loses his life in a similar way, Sherlock is called in on the case. He sends Dr. Watson, his faithful friend, to the moors to gather clues. Like any good mystery, we’re given our suspects and clues bit by bit. There’s even a good red herring, diverting our suspicions. There’s nothing earth shattering about the plot, but it’s just the right pace for this little book. The real treat with Doyle’s work is character of Sherlock himself. He is completely unique. I love his condescension, even when he’s trying to compliment Watson, it comes across as an insult. His brain just works on a completely different level and he’s not always aware of the necessary social niceties. Or rather, he’s aware of them, but they are unimportant in the big scheme of things, so he chooses to ignore them. “That cold, incisive, ironical voice could belong to but one man in all the world. ‘Holmes!’ I cried.” – Watson (and that’s coming from the man’s best friend!)“One of Sherlock’s defects – if, indeed, one may call it a defect – was that he was exceedingly loath to communicate his full plans to any other person until the instant of their fulfillment.”If you’ve loved this series for years or want to try your first foray into the world of the Baker Street detective, this book is an absolute must. “There is nothing more stimulating than a case where everything goes against you.” - Sherlock