Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
A Night Too Dark: A Kate Shugak Novel

A Night Too Dark: A Kate Shugak Novel

Written by Dana Stabenow

Narrated by Marguerite Gavin


A Night Too Dark: A Kate Shugak Novel

Written by Dana Stabenow

Narrated by Marguerite Gavin

ratings:
4/5 (13 ratings)
Length:
10 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 16, 2010
ISBN:
9781427208897
Format:
Audiobook

Description

A Night Too Dark is New York Times bestselling writer Dana Stabenow's latest, the seventeenth in a series chronicling life, death, love, tragedy, mischief, controversy, nature, and survival in Alaska, America's last real frontier.

In Alaska, people disappear every day. In Aleut detective Kate Shugak's Park, they've been disappearing a lot lately. Hikers head into the wilderness unprepared and get lost. Miners quit without notice at the busy Suulutaq Mine. Suicides leave farewell notes and vanish.

Not only are Park rats disappearing at an alarming rate, but so is life in the Park as Kate knows it. Alaska state trooper Jim Chopin's workload has increased to where he doesn't make it home three nights out of four, the controversial mine has seduced Johnny and his classmates with summer jobs and divided the Niniltna Native Association—the aunties are to a woman selling out—and a hostile environmental activist organization has embraced the Suulutaq Mine as their reason for being.

It's almost a relief when Kate finds a body. This she can handle.

Until the identity of the body vanishes, too.

In this latest Kate Shugak novel, the smart, sexy PI, her wolf/husky hybrid Mutt, and Chopper Jim are only just beginning to realize the fallout from the discovery of the world's second-largest gold mine in their backyard. "Mine change everything," Auntie Vi said in Whisper to the Blood (the previous book in the series and the first to hit the New York Times bestseller list).

And it's only just beginning.

A Macmillan Audio production.

Publisher:
Released:
Feb 16, 2010
ISBN:
9781427208897
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Dana Stabenow is a popular American author who has produced works in the science fiction, mystery, and sus-pense/thriller genres. She was born in Anchorage and lives near Homer, AK. www.stabenow.com

Related to A Night Too Dark


Reviews

What people think about A Night Too Dark

4.2
13 ratings / 9 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    In Alaska, somebody disappears every day. Hunters who head into the wilderness. . .fishermen who brave the great rivers. . .tourists who attempt to do both. In Aleut detective Kate Shugak's park, people have been falling off the grid quite a bit lately. And as she and state trooper Jim Chopin are about to realize, it's got something to do with the recent discovery of the world's second-largest gold mine in their very own backyard. A hostile environmental activist organization has embraced Alaska's Suulutaq Mine as its reason for being, attracting more attention than many of the locals can tolerate.
  • (4/5)
    A page turner, with a great plot, a wonderful protagonist in Kate Shugak, a private investigator who works and sleeps along side law enforcement authorities in Alaska. She's also fully in stride with the Alaska Niniltna Native Association. In that role, the plot just drips local politics. You wonder how Stabenow, who lives in AZ, gets this Alaska stuff? The mine, home to many recalcitrant, greedy, park rats, also plays a background role in the environmental theme.Life's gonna change, we just don't know how. It's going to get better, I'm sure. However...without summary plot, this book just ends....
  • (4/5)
    A nice entry in the series. You can feel it setting up the next books in the series, but I don't mind that. You will need the background then. I will miss Old Sam. Here's hoping Annie steps up to the plate.
  • (4/5)
    A page turner, with a great plot, a wonderful protagonist in Kate Shugak, a private investigator who works along side the tribal and government law enforcement authorities in the Alaskan wilderness. This is evidently the 17th in the series, but I didn't feel I need much back fill to enjoy the story. The plot revolves around a greedy mining company wanting to dig gold from a pristine and ecologically endangered mine. I thought the author did an excellent job balancing what could have become a political diatribe and instead offered a fair explanation of the issues. These were certainly debated enough to cause murder and mayhem, missing and mis-identified bodies, and offer Kate the chance to once again help put together the clues she and others piece together from the wilderness. There's just enough question mark left at the end (no spoilers here!) to make readers look forward to the next in the series.
  • (3/5)
    This is my first book by this author. I realize that it is the 17th in the series but I don't think it mattered. I don't feel that I was lost without reading the others. Sure there were a couple parts where I didn't know what the author was talking about but then she explained what had happened in a past book so I understood it. Saying that I truly loved this book so much I'm thinking of going back to the beginning to see how great they were and find ever juicy bit I missed : )
  • (4/5)
    Gold mining threatens Niniltna and the rest of the Park and life may never be the same. Murder and mayhem follow in this fast paced, if somewhat predictable, thriller. Stabenow again successfully brings Alaska alive for those of us far from its vast expanses. Well worth the read
  • (5/5)
    Writing that's both perfectly burnished yet smoothly casual, Stabenow has such a great voice--the reader seems to be seated on Kate Shugak's shoulder listening to her inner thoughts. And man oh man, I feel that I know precisely how it feels to be charged by a large, angry bear. Wow!
  • (4/5)
    Another solid entry in this long-running series. Changes--some good, some bad--are coming to Niniltna and the rest of the Park as a neighboring gold mine begins operations. As always, the real pleasures are the people and the setting.
  • (4/5)
    Change is creeping up on the Park. Global Harvest, the international corporation that owns mineral rights to the Suulutaq Mine is busily drilling core samples in an attempt to determine just how rich the gold seam they've discovered actually is. It's looking richer all the time, and as the dollar signs increase, the amount of money pouring back into the Park does as well. More people, unfortunately, mean more trouble for Kate and all the Park Rats. More people unfamiliar with the unforgiving Alaskan wilderness, more young, unattached men looking to blow off some steam. And when one of them turns up dead, a possible suicide, Kate smells a rat - and not a Park Rat.When Stabenow's plots began to get darker and she killed Jack off, I swore off Stabenow for a while. I'm glad I picked this one up - I wouldn't say this is necessarily a kinder, gentler Kate, but the overall feel of the book is a bit lighter, which was a welcome change. A couple of laugh out loud spots, but not too much in the way of high drama or action. Albeit there's a definite ominous cloud looming in the form of Global Harvest and the environmentalist group plotting against them. One thing I will say - Stabenow's characters are memorable enough that even after a gap of several years I didn't feel as if I was floundering among unfamiliar faces.