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The Search for WondLa

The Search for WondLa

Written by Tony DiTerlizzi

Narrated by Teri Hatcher


The Search for WondLa

Written by Tony DiTerlizzi

Narrated by Teri Hatcher

ratings:
3.5/5 (28 ratings)
Length:
10 hours
Released:
Sep 21, 2010
ISBN:
9781442334304
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

New York Times bestselling phenomenon Tony DiTerlizzi begins a new fantastical series.

In this first of a trilogy, Eva9, an eleven-year-old girl, has been raised in isolation on what appears to be an alien world. When her underground sanctuary is destroyed, she sets out on a journey to discover the truth of her origins and the planet she is learning to call home. Written with Tony DiTerlizzi's penchant for the weird, The Search for WondLa pays homage to classic literature as it chronicles one girl's exploration of a world that is both foreign and familiar.
Released:
Sep 21, 2010
ISBN:
9781442334304
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Tony DiTerlizzi is a #1 New York Times bestselling author and illustrator who has been creating books for twenty years. From fanciful picture books, such as Jimmy Zangwow’s Out-of-This-World Moon-Pie Adventure and The Spider and the Fly (a Caldecott Honor Book), to fantastic middle grade novels like Kenny & the Dragon and the WondLa trilogy, Tony imbues each story with his rich imagination. He created The Spiderwick Chronicles with Holly Black, which has sold millions of copies around the world. You can learn more about Tony at DiTerlizzi.com.


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What people think about The Search for WondLa

3.6
28 ratings / 33 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Even though the author puts together some ideas from other sci-fi/fantasy series I've read over the years, (and once you get to the end you realize the parallel journey with a very famous fantasy series), the imaginative new world and creatures detailed and beautifully illustrated throughout the book help propel you reading even more quickly.
  • (2/5)
    i know everyone loves this book and says it's like the bae, but i really didn't enjoy it. It seemed like the author was just dragging out the plot to make the book longer.
  • (4/5)
    A wondrous tale accompanied by impressive illustrations of a young girl who emerges from a high-tech bunker to a strange world unlike the one she has learned about.
  • (5/5)
    A new series by the genius storyteller Tony Diterlizzi of the Spiderwick Chronicles! Had to wait for my 10 year old daughter to read it before I could dive in. Upon finishing, she gave me two thumbs-up and a "best book I've ever read" (and she's a BIG BIG reader) proclamation. Without that, I would have wondered if the book wasn't too lonely and slow for a little reader . . . and OUT THERE! By out there, I mean original. You have to imagine and conceive every single thing in the book ecxept for the young (and only human) herself, until the very end. And the very end? Read it so we can talk about it's deliciousness!
  • (4/5)
    Oh, my goodness! So much fun. So much suspense. Great characters. I wasn't sure what to expect from this. I was happy.
  • (5/5)
    This was an incredible story. It's science fiction being presented as a fairy tale. I truly loved the entire story. It took me quite a while to read, but I enjoyed every minute of it. Eva Nine is a really cool character, as were Rovender Kitt and Muthr. My favorite character was Otto the water bear, so gentle and loyal. What a great book!
  • (4/5)
    Eva Nine has lived her whole life in an underground sanctuary. She dreams of exploring the surface and meeting more of her kind. So when Eva's sanctuary is attacked by an unknown being she is excited about being able to leave her home. But the surface of earth is way different than what Eva had learned from Muthr, the robot that raised her. Eva, with the help of some new friends, must survive in the vast wilderness and find the true meaning of her WondLa.
  • (5/5)
    The Search for Wondla was a trip down memory lane because it was reminiscent of movies such as "Dark Crystal", "Neverending Story" and "Labyrinth" that are packed with magical charm. Reading the bio on the Author, Tony DiTerlizzi, I found out his inspiration includes Jim Henson which explains so much. All the characters emerged in my memory as intricate puppets, the likes you've no doubt seen in all those movies mentioned above. The Author definitely has the nack to tickle the imagination, part of the reason why I liked the book so much was the images flowing through my mind. Not many books can spark my imagination like that anymore at my age. While the book was not expertly written, the descriptions the Author used to help with that visualization was enough to give this book five stars.

    I also have to comment on the topic and theme of the book being a cross between futuristic sci-fi and whimsical fantasy. The combination was perfect, at least for me, and went so well with the Henson-esque style that was performing in my head as I read. As much as I enjoyed the book, I find myself needing a break before continuing with the sequel. The book is undeniably for children, which I am not, and I didn't want to get too burned out on the magic I felt while reading it. I will continue with the series in the future and can only hope that if a movie is made from this series that it won't be CG, I would implore the Author to use those magical Henson puppets that filled my childhood with glee.
  • (3/5)
    Quite a delightful wee book with some beautiful illustrations and a relatively sweet plot, where friendship seemed to be one of the most important factors. The world was original and interesting, and the characters are charming. Ultimately, however, I think this is one better suited to a younger reader than I. The whole bounty-hunter-pursuing-heroes-through-everything gets a little tired after a while.
  • (4/5)
    Beautiful book. I hope one day to read this to my son as an introduction to science fiction. Looking forward to the next one.
  • (4/5)
    Love the illustrations. My favorite part. I picked it up thinking it was fantasy -- the illustrations give off a strong fantasy vibe to me. But it's really sci-fi -- a good adventure/survival story. Not my taste, but it's a good book.
  • (1/5)
    I wish I had better things to say about this book. Of course the illustrations are gorgeous, but writing is not Mr. DiTerlizzi's strength. I imagine Spiderwick worked so well is because someone else wrote the story and he illustrated it.

    I wish his editor had taken a red pen to about 3/4 of the adjectives he used. The descriptions were so incredibly detailed, with sometimes two or three adjectives, the story takes much too long to tell. Sadly, I think his fame hurt him in this case because it was accepted for publication much too early. If a lot more work had been put into the language of the story, it might have been an incredible book.

    The only thing that (might) entice me to finish is the gorgeousness of the illustrations. If I do keep plugging away, I'll most likely skim the text and enjoy the illustrations. It's very disappointing.
  • (4/5)
    Eva Nine is forced to leave her home when it is attacked by a hunter. She leaves her home and goes to the surface of the planet for the first time in her entire life. Eva, her Muthr robot, Rovender Kit and Otto (two friends she makes along the way) end up going on an epic journey to try and find other human's. Along the way they encounter many different people and creatures that Eva and Muthr have never seen and you get to see Eva, Rovender and Muthr's relationship grow and change which I am always a huge fan of.

    I don't know what it was about this book but it constantly had me thinking of Star Wars (although once I got to the end I very clearly saw the relationship this book has with the Wizard of Oz.)

    Terri Hatcher did a great job reading this book. Her voices for the characters and the narrator were spot on and I really enjoyed listening to it.
  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    3.5 stars.

    Eva Nine, the only human living in an underground sanctuary, is forced to go to the surface after an attack on her home.

    10-13 year olds who are fans of science fiction & fantasy will enjoy this book but I feel that for an adult reader there are too many classic tropes for it to be quite as gripping.

    DiTerlizzi is a good writer and an amazing illustrator (and it's cool that we get to see exactly what the author believes his creations to look like) but the story isn't strong enough to appeal to anyone much older than Eva Nine.

    There is plenty of action at the start and finish, but it does drag a bit in the middle. The hefty size of the book might deter some you readers but the print is relatively large, the chapters very short and it has several illustrations.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)
    Although the kids and I liked the book well enough, I felt there was something missing - something I can't quite put my finger on. For some reason, I didn't quite connect with any of the main characters; that could have been part the problem. Looking at the world through Eva's eyes, having her be as uninformed about the world around her as I was, and there being no real explanation for a lot of the things she saw and experienced was a bit confusing at times; that could have been part of the problem as well. But I think the biggest problem was the fact that the ending really didn't make sense given what you know of Eva's life before the book opened. Maybe that discrepancy is going to be explained in the sequel; but at the moment, it was off putting enough that I'm not sure I care enough to check the sequel out. Maybe we'll read it; maybe we won't. Time will tell.
  • (3/5)
    There is much to love about DiTerlizzi's writing, and his plucky heroine and intriguing post-apocalyptic landscape are among the novel's strengths. But the book does not hang together as a narrative, losing much of its promise in over-drawn sections of description and, in general, a bit too much preoccupation with its own cleverness.
  • (4/5)
    Eva Nine has only ever lived underground with her robot, Muther. All she wants is to learn enough about the surface of earth to be able to go aboveground. When her sanctuary is attacked, she must flee above, but without Muthr. As Eva tries to match what she has learned about Earth with the desolation and terrible creatures around, she wonders why she seems to be the only human...A good adventure story with, what seems like, predictable story extenders. The group is out of trouble for a few chapters and then is back into the enemy's clutches. I had a hard time with the safe/unsafe wheel the story seemed to travel on, but definitely cared about the characters and would like to read the next book (sometime).
  • (4/5)
    We start off on an unknown planet with a girl and her robot. All she dreams of late is freedom and finding her own kind. An unexpected intruder to her underground Sanctuary forces her to leave the only shelter and family she has ever known. Escaping to the surface for the first time, Eva discovers that the freedom she had desired for so long comes with a large side of danger and a wallop of new experiences she cannot comprehend nor compute. An adventure in a strange foreign world with friendships tried and tested, a young girl's hopes and dreams may yet one day come true. The Search for Wondla is a highly imaginative and brilliantly illustrated story. The coming of age journey that Eva goes through was both endearing and heart warming. With a strong emphasis on family and friendships, a strange and exotic world, an ending that provides a perfect blend of resolution and twists to keep you wanting to find out what is going to happen in the subsequent book of the series, makes this a must read for science fiction fans out there. I can't recommend this book enough.
  • (3/5)
    It's one of the rare science fiction books written for children nowadays. Today's books are either half-comic diaries written for 3rd graders (I'm gonna write one too, it'll be called The Diary of a Blimpy Kid), or it's teen angst filled vampires and goth boys with dark eyebrows. Very little is what you would call speculative fiction. I have been impressed with the resurgence of "dystopian" worlds in the Young Adult section, although I have been a little hesitant to read them. The problem with writing most futuristic fiction is that you have to resist the urge to relate current political views with the outcome of mankind. It irks me when authors who are writing for entertainment decide to stick a platform from either party into a character. It usually sticks out like a sore thumb, turning an otherwise sympathetic character into a mechanical airhorn for a political party. And there have been some doosies in my reading. For instance, the Communist dragon in Alan Dean Foster's Spellsinger series. I stopped reading the book because of that. Or when Queen Amadala says, "And this is how freedom ends, with thunderous applause," during the newest Star Wars movies. And sometimes whole movies, like Avatar, are nothing but a platform for Environmental zealots, who are all anti-business and all for the government regulating everything. There are some recent books, like Brave Story, which I read a few months back, which has a little of that in it, but it's easy to overlook.It's one of the main complaints I have with The Search for WondLa, as Rovendeer, the traveling Jimmy Cricket that accompanies Eva Nine on her journey, sometimes becomes a chorus that says general statements about the bad guys that are actually supposed to be about us. The book itself, though, flows along quite nicely, with good plot twists and the usual "to be continued" thing at the end, as it's the beginning of a series. I read it quickly and easily, and would recommend it to any kid who liked Avatar, for instance, or Wall-E, which it was quite similar to, in theme. I always kept wondering, what would Orson Scott Card have done with this book? How much more depth and natural flow it would have had, even with the themes that were put in. As usual with children's books, it had a lot more potential. Of course, that's me talking, as the works of Card are books for adults that are about kids, and this book is a book for kids. How wonderful are those in which a balanced is reached.
  • (3/5)
    A wonderful journey through a fantastical landscape. Its "Alice in Wonderful" for the next generation. Adding to the amusement - being able to interact with the book with "WondLa Vision"!
  • (4/5)
    I will admit, I am drawn to DiTerlizzi because of his phenomenal artistic abilities. His style of illustration is perfectly suited to my tastes, especially for children's literature, and I fell in love with his pictures when I read the Spiderwick series. When I saw this book featured on Amazon, his name is what grabbed my attention. This is a novel, though, and not a picture book; but when I read the synopsis, it sounded like a fascinating story, and the illustrations looked enticing. That last sentence, in essence, sums up my reaction to the book: it was a good story, just average writing but original concepts, and the illustrations were lovely and brought this rating up a level.The story follows Eva 9, a human girl who grew up underground in the Sanctuary with her robot mom, Muthr. She longs to explore the world outside, on the surface, but her Muthr insists she's not ready. When a hunter invades her home, Eva is forced to flee to the world she longed to visit, but without Muthr and without preparation. She discovers that things on the surface are not what she expected: none of her training or education corresponds to the flora, fauna, or geography she discovers up above. Even worse, the hunter continues to track her down.She meets Rovender Kitt, a solitary alien, and learns that he has never seen another human on the planet before. They travel together, trekking from one city to another, as they attempt to evade Besteel the hunter, find and rescue Muther, and ultimately learn what fate has befallen Eva's ancestors. The story alternates between exciting action sequences and chases, and more sedate scenes that explore the exotic terrain and probe Eva's coming of age. I thought that the author did a nice job balancing the exposition with the action. After all, this is a new planet that DiTerlizzi is describing, with a unique history and strange new species, and he needs narrative space to describe all these details to us. Still. he balances the revelations with a lot of excitement. I found this a fun and easy read.This book reminded me of old-school science fiction reads. The world is strange and exotic, it feels solid, like a real place; the story is dry when describing the setting, but that just feels right, because it's cataloging a new world. I thought the writing was adequate for a action-driven kids' story, and that the characters developed over the course of the narrative, and that the illustrations were admirable. It may not be my favorite new series, but I do look forward to completing the trilogy.
  • (5/5)
    Loved, loved, loved this book! Eva Nine's journey completely drew me in. I cannot wait for the next book in the series...not until May of next year. :(
  • (3/5)
    The one thing that saved this book from being rated "2 stars" was that it had one of the best villain killings I have read in a long time. It wasn't a long, drawn out, descriptive scene, but it was so very effective. It was very clever. Other than that, the book was pretty dull. Not my favorite book by DiTerlizzi.
  • (2/5)
    It's a very imaginative story and I think Teri Hatcher did a nice job with the narration (nice clear voice, distinct and appropriate voices). But. Normally, I appreciate a realistic kid character, but it just didn't seem like Eva 9 EVER did anything on her own. Pretty much the whole time I thought Eva 9 was such a whiny brat that I kept rooting for various characters to take her out. That's just how I feel. Kids will be more forgiving of Eva 9 and I'd hand it to kids who are voracious readers of epic fantasy and science fiction.
  • (3/5)
    My daughter, having read this book that I gave her, asked me to read it because it was so good. I liked reading this -everything about it but the ending was fun. Thin ending, though, and along the way it did become a bit contrived. The main three characters were fun, though, and that goes a long way.
  • (4/5)
    Twelve-year-old Eva Nine has spent her entire life living in Sanctuary, an underground compound where she is cared for by the motherly robot, Muthr (Multi-Utility Task Help Robot). She's never met another human nor visited the surface and she longs to do both, dreaming of a world - and of the companionship and love to be found there - that she's only seen glimpses of on scraps of paper. When Sanctuary is attacked, Eva is forced to escape to the surface alone, where she soon finds that the reality of life there is more amazing and puzzling than she ever imagined. It is also far more dangerous. We share Eva's wonder and astonishment as she views the night sky for the first time and understand her fear when she first feels the heat of the sun on her skin and panics, thinking it will burn her. And it is those two things - wonder and fear - that drive much of the story. Eva is smart and brave, caring, curious and resourceful, but she is also young and inexperienced. The controlled amounts of knowledge that have been passed down to her prove to be woefully inadequate as well as either inaccurate or deliberately false (or perhaps a mixture of the two). It seems that everything Eva sees and experiences just leave her (and us) with more questions. Author Tony DiTerlizzi has done a very good job of allowing readers to share Eva's confusion and to be in on each discovery right along with her. Because I found Eva so likeable and engagingly real, I really cared about her and wanted to share her journey as she sought to discover just who, what and where she is. Though I found the writing just a bit clunky at times and occasionally wished for the pace to pick up (possibly because I really, REALLY wanted to know what was going to happen!), my connection to Eva kept me involved in the story and certainly kept me turning the pages. Lavishly illustrated (again by DiTerlizzi, whose artwork I so admired in Arthur Spiderwick's Field Guide to the Fantastical World Around You, The Search for WondLa is also beautiful to look at. Through the art, DiTerlizzi not only shows us Eva's world, but beautifully conveys her wonder and curiosity as she discovers it. The drawings add tremendously to the whole, making The Search for WondLa not just a book but an experience. The conclusion led me to believe that at least one sequel is planned (or had darned well better be). I'm already anxiously awaiting it. Recommended. Note: A very attractive website has been created for this book. There, readers can try out "WondLa-Vision" by holding certain pages of the book up to their webcam which activates an interactive 3D map. I don't have a webcam, so can't explore WondLa-Vision, but the demo on the website certainly looks intriguing! Visitors can also read or listen to an excerpt, play some games and download wallpapers, etc. This is a book website done right and I recommend a visit. Paramount reportedly has optioned the film rights.
  • (4/5)
    Written by Tony Diterlizzi (The Spiderwick Chronicles), this page turner is set in another world, one that the author manages to bring to life and transport the reader into. As a bonus, this book has pages within that are interactive with a webcam, and shows 3D images. This juvenile science fiction title is sure to please fans both young and old.
  • (4/5)
    Nominally a book for 9+/11+ according to LoveReading but much like Harry Potter, this is too good to be left just for kids. Its a fantastic book by one of the creators of The Spiderwick Chronicles (which is also a fab book by the way). Its about a human girl, Eva, who lives in an underground sanctuary with her robot muthr (correct spelling!). Having never left the underground sanctuary her life is thrown into turmoil by a hunter who breaks in and tries to capture Eva. What then transpires is an archetypal "road movie" as Eva, her mother and a couple of aliens Eva befriend go on a journey to find other humans like Eva. Its well written and being a kids book very easy to read, the characters are excellent. The book doesn't really tread new ground but its just a really excellent read whether you are a kid or a grown up.
  • (4/5)
    This was a fun book to read. I love picking up a middle grade level book and finding myself lost in a fantastic tale filled with magical creatures, robots and the thrill of danger.Eva Nine is a young, human girl being raised by Muthr, a robot, in a place called "Sanctuary". One day though, her world is thrown into chaos and she finds herself being tested to her limits.The illustrations, the way each part of the story is done and the progression of the storyline kept my interest and made me sad when the book finally ended. Do not be daunted by the size of this book, it's easily broken up and was full of action.If you are looking for a Christmas gift for a middle-schooler, I definitely recommend this book be put on the list. I can't wait until book two is released!
  • (4/5)
    I've been on a big young adult fiction kick lately, and I really enjoyed this book. The illustrations (which are amazing and wonderful) are what drew me in, and I bought the book purely for them. This book was a quick read, but I found it to be very engaging. There could have been more in the character development/backstory area, but I wasn't confused and I didn't feel gypped, just curious. I felt that the adventure moved at a very good pace, and I thought the world was easy to picture. The ending is a huge cliffhanger however, which annoys me, because rather than leave me thinking "Yes, there's more coming", I thought "WHAT? That's the end!?" I hate waiting for other books in the series when the one before ends on a part of the plot that should really be continued. Overally, I really enjoyed this book and the futuristic theme mixed with new breeds of animals that centered around evolutions of familiar underwater life.