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The Border Lords: A Charlie Hood Novel

The Border Lords: A Charlie Hood Novel

Written by T. Jefferson Parker

Narrated by David Colacci


The Border Lords: A Charlie Hood Novel

Written by T. Jefferson Parker

Narrated by David Colacci

ratings:
2.5/5 (4 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Released:
Jan 11, 2011
ISBN:
9781611061116
Format:
Audiobook

Description

ATF agent Sean Ozburn is deep undercover, supporting the sicarios of the North Baja Cartel, when he suddenly goes completely dark, leaving Charlie Hood and the support team from Operation Blowdown with a safe house full of bodies and no explanation. Sean's only communication in the following days consists of a series of haunting digital videos sent to his desperately worried wife, Seliah.

As he pieces together evidence of his friend's strange quest and searches the border landscape, following faint signals to the man's whereabouts, Charlie Hood must determine if Oz is simply chasing demons deeper undercover than anyone has ever gone, or whether his friend has suffered a permanent break with his mission and his moral compass.

A crime novel of unprecedented scope and unrivaled storytelling ambition, The Border Lords revisits the fevered landscape of America's southern border-and confronts the unexplored depths of humanity's dark soul.

Released:
Jan 11, 2011
ISBN:
9781611061116
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

T. Jefferson Parker is the bestselling author of seventeen novels, including the Edgar® Award winners California Girl and Silent Joe. Alongside Dick Francis and James Lee Burke, he is one of only three writers who has won the Edgar® Award for Best Novel more than once. Parker lives with his family in Southern California.


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Reviews

What people think about The Border Lords

2.5
4 ratings / 4 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    Sometimes you come across books that keep your interest but at the end you can't really say if they were good or bad. This is one of those books. The story, basically about an undercover agent that has been under to long ,is interesting. All the charters are compelling, save for the protagonist Charlie Hood. Everybody else in the book I can get a picture of in my head. Hood is just blank. Which is very odd considering he is the focus of a whole series of books. I'd recommend this book for days when you just don't want to think that hard and you want a good story.
  • (1/5)
    In my humble opinion, this novel was dreadful. There was nothing remotely believable or intriguing about it. In this novel an ATF agent goes off the grid and starts killing the bad guys he's investigating. And the reason why he went off the grid - he and his girlfriend had rabies that was purposefully given to him by a priest. The story line is so convoluted and there isn't a shred of believability to it. And to make matters worse, out of nowhere the author just throws in supernatural elements to it. If you're going to make a book a fantasy, then make it a fantasy. Don't have 95% be rooted in reality and then throw in fantasy elements. This is the first book I've ever read from Parker and it will be the last. Based on reading this novel, my assessment is that he doesn't have a clue as to how to put together a credible novel.Carl Alves - Two For Eternity
  • (2/5)
    I've been reading T. Jefferson Parker's novels for 20 years and have always enjoyed his work. His realistic snapshots of modern and historic Southern California (especially Orange County) have always been spot-on. His characters are nuanced and complex, his settings are richly drawn, and his plots entertaining and believable. But, over the last five books, Parker has been faltering; this latest book is a disaster.I've struggled with the characters in the Charlie Hood series. Everyone seems to be pretty much the same guy and I don't remember any of the characters from the previous books (except Charlie). Everyone is interchangeable, no one seems real, and I'd have no interest in hanging out with any of them. And what the hell do any of the women (Erin, Beth, Seliah - yet another set of interchangeable characters) see in the men? And why are the men all so sappy about these women? Who cares? They're all dumb, blind, id-driven boobs. And why the fascination with leather pants?In the series, The Border Lords is the worst of the bunch. I spent about 100 pages yelling at the characters - you idiots, they've got [disease name removed to avoid spoiling the plot]! On top of all that I mildly disliked about the previous books in the series, the latest entry adds an extra helping of supernatural bullshit to the mix. If you are thinking of reading this book, I implore you, pick up one his early books instead: Laguna Heat, Pacific Beat, or even the more recent California Girl. They are lyrical, Border Lords is a cacophony. Fine wine v. table plonk. Pate v. tinned meat. Platinum v. imported cadmium jewelry. Newport Beach v. Fallbrook. Pick your own comparison - no matter your choice, the Charlie Hood series just doesn't measure up.
  • (4/5)
    Eighteen months is much longer than the average law
    enforcement offi cer stays undercover, but Sean Gravas
    was so close that to pull him now would see months of
    operational expenses go down the drain. Hood made
    the decision to leave him in. He was working with gang members,
    the North Baja Cartel, across the Mexican border to break a gunrunners
    ring suspected of smuggling in a thousand machine pistols.
    When all the gang members in the home are brutally slain, Gravas
    appears to be implicated, so Hood solicits the help of Gravas’ wife
    Seliah to bring him out of his undercover role as Ozburn even if it
    means he has to face charges. Seliah notices changes in her husband’s
    behavior, which the Blowdown team put down to the stress of being
    undercover for so long, until she is threatened by the same viral
    disease that is rampaging through both their bodies and is diagnosed
    as rabies. Weeks from death, Seliah is placed in a coma while she
    heals. LASD tries to convince Gravas that he too is ill.
    However, this is more than just a story about undercover agents
    on the Mexican border, drugs, guns and murder. Just who is the
    mysterious priest, Father Joe Left wich? Recognized as a local drugdealer
    and snitch, a.k.a. Mike Finnegan, who claims to have ridden
    with Murietta over one hundred and eighty years ago and the truth
    of the blood-transmitted disease becomes clearer.
    In this fast-paced, action thriller Parker has once again demonstrated
    the ability to keep his audience turning pages until the last drop of
    blood is accounted for, and provides just the right twist in the end.