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Burning Lamp

Burning Lamp

Written by Amanda Quick

Narrated by Anne Flosnik


Burning Lamp

Written by Amanda Quick

Narrated by Anne Flosnik

ratings:
4/5 (20 ratings)
Length:
4 hours
Released:
Sep 17, 2010
ISBN:
9781441893543
Format:
Audiobook

Description

The Arcane Society was born in turmoil, when the friendship of its two founders evolved into a fierce rivalry. Nicholas Winters's efforts led to the creation of a device of unknown powers called the Burning Lamp. Each generation, the Winters man who inherits it is destined to develop multiple talents - and the curse of madness.
Plagued by hallucinations and nightmares, the notorious crime lord Griffin Winters is convinced he has been struck with the Winters Curse. But even as he arranges a meeting with the mysterious Adelaide Pyne, he has no idea how closely their fates are bound, for she holds the missing lamp in her possession.
Their dangerous psychical experiment makes them the target of forces both inside and outside the Arcane Society. And though desire strengthens their power, their different lives will keep them apart - if death doesn't take them together.
Released:
Sep 17, 2010
ISBN:
9781441893543
Format:
Audiobook

About the author


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Reviews

What people think about Burning Lamp

3.9
20 ratings / 14 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    reread, paranormal, romance, murder, crime, social-issues This one is also after Perfect Poison, and does have appearances by the founders of the Jones Agency. As we see in the publisher's blurb, the crime boss meets a social reformer who is able to assist him with an apparent genetic issue. There is much interweaving with previous Arcane Society books, and the Sweetwater family is introduced at the end. I like it and reread it every couple of years.
  • (3/5)
    I think maybe I need a Krentz/Quick rest. I usually love her books, though each is the same as the one before it. This is exactly like the other Dreamlight books. The characters are smart and witty and enjoyable, the thing that draws the characters together is the lamp and the need for the dreamlight, there is a diverse cast of characters (this one has Trans men, which is fun and new.) The elements of good Krentz are here, but it was just flat for me. It may just be that I need more distance so I don't focus on how I have read essentially the same book 4 times. If you like Krentz, I expect you will enjoy this enough for a light read.
  • (3/5)
    If you like Amanda Quick books, then you will like this one. One thing I like about her writing is that we rarely see a historical setting for the paranormal.

    The down side? If you have read one Amanda Quick book, then you have read them all. Pretty much every hero and heroine are the same, no matter what book. Believe me, I've read most and the male is usually emotionally broken, social outcast (even if he is in the Ton) and by learning to love our hot chic he learns to live again.

    Not bad, but if every book is the same thing, why read more than one book?

    Again, if you like Amanda Quick, then you will like this book. It's a fast, easy read and you will be entertained. If you are looking for hot steamy sex scenes, then this book is not for you.

  • (5/5)
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I liked how the characters tied together and thought the plot was clever and amusing. I also love how she brings in characters from past books whose futures I wonder about. I like the connection between the Jones and the Winters.
  • (3/5)
    Burning Lamp
    3.5 Stars

    Once again, the historical installment is not on a par with the contemporary. In fact, Burning Lamp reads like a mediocre retelling of Fired Up.

    The nature of Griffin's "curse" remains ambiguous and it is never clear whether or not the issue is resolved. Nevertheless, he is a compelling hero and his characterization as a crime lord with a soft spot is endearing. Adelaide is an intriguing heroine and her past is definitely colorful. Unfortunately, the romance falls flat as Adelaide and Griffin's chemistry is virtually non-existent and their declarations of love seem tacked on as an afterthought.

    The mystery surrounding the Burning Lamp is interesting enough - there are several villains each with their own agenda and it all comes together nicely at the end.

    The next book is Midnight Crystal, which is set in the future. I'm a bit wary as I've never read any of the books under the Jayne Castle pseudonym and I'm not a big fan of futuristic novels.
  • (5/5)
    Book Two in the sub-series "Dreamlight Trilogy"

    This one has the Victorian era story of the clash between the Winters' and the Jones' - Griffin Winters is a crime lord who has inherited the family curse, he can work the Burning Lamp with a dreamlight power, in this case Adelaine Pyne. J&J is watching to see if Winters turns into a Cerebus, a multi-talent who is destined to destroy the Jones clan.

    Adelaine can control the power that Griffin has when working the Lamp.

    I do love this series, it is a lot of fun, especially the three totally different times/locations for the stories. As Krentz the stories are contemporary, As Quick they are Victorian era and as Castle they are set on another world (Harmony).

    Midnight Crystal is set to come out in August, it is the Castle contribution to and the last of the trilogy. I can't wait.
  • (3/5)
    Crime lord Nicholas Winters needs two things: the Burning Lamp created by his ancestor, and a dreamlight reader. Otherwise, his chances of surviving are slim to none. He's convinced he's located the later in London's latest social reformer, a mysterious lady known as The Widow.Social reformer Adelaide Pyne has a secret identity, a hidden talent, and a mission: free as many young, underprivileged London girls from the horrific brothels they're trapped in as possible. It's a worthy goal, but she's about to discover just how dangerous a path she's chosen.No surprises here. Quick continues to weave the strands of her long running Arcane world together, and Nicolas and Adelaide are another well-matched couple caught up in the threads of the larger story.
  • (4/5)
    As with the first book in this trilogy (Fired Up), I had not read an Amanda Quick book. The feel was quite different from Castle or Krentz's books. I enjoyed the mix of history and this was quite a bit tamer (sexually) than the other two books. The only thing I didn't like was the narrator. I thought she was very nasally in her narration.
  • (2/5)
    I started this series with Fired Up and I'll say that it was a much better book than this. I wasn't to excited through this book it seemed kind of dull to me and a lot of the stuff is repeating information that you recieved in the first book but elaborated on. I'm not sure I would even call this a great historical it seemed that the setting of the story was all that made it a historical there was very little information added about the time and the customs of the time took a back burner to the the small plot.
  • (3/5)
    Another paranormal off the Krentz assembly line. It's a fast read and not that bad but the characters are the same ones that are in a dozen other Krentz books and the situation/mystery is pretty much the same, with a slightly changed backdrop. I just get the feeling that she isn't even trying to make them unique anymore. She knows what her customers have been buying and is giving them more of the same. The creative juices feel like they dried to a trickle and never get out of the same creek bed.
  • (4/5)
    Yes it's a romance novel with a slight glazing of mystery/thriller, yes it's shallow and parts of the plot do fall apart with a bit of poking but I found it a fun read.Adelaide Pyne fled London several years ago having found herself orphaned and sold to a brothel. She returns to London determined to give some of the prostitutes a chance at a different life and organises raids on the brothels and for the girls to go to an academy to change.He's the leader of an underworld gang. Using his psychic talents to help him, but now his talents are starting to become unpredictable and she has the tool and the talents to help him.It's pretty predictable, as I said, but I found it a fun read.
  • (2/5)
    I was certain I had read this book before, but as the book was just published, I knew I could not have. And yet I have--in the first one of this trilogy and other Arcane novels by Amanda Quick. It seems as though she has changed the names and the century but otherwise the book is annoying familiar. I have been a long time fan, but this book is such a retread, I will no longer seek out her novels.
  • (4/5)
    Social reformer, crime lord, psychic artifact, family curse.On a par with "Quick"s last few.
  • (4/5)
    Book 2 in the Dreamlight Trilogy, Book 8 in the Arcane Society series (also writes as Jayne Ann Krentz). After Adelaide Pyne (referred to as a social reformer, but a better descriptor might be adventuress) begins a series of raids on London brothels for the purpose of rescuing the young girls trapped inside, crime lord Griffin Winters decides to rescue her -- both from the rival crime lord who owns the brothels and from herself. In exchange, he wants her to use her dreamlight powers to rescue him from a family curse. Special guest stars include Lucinda and Caleb Jones from The Perfect Poison.If you're familiar with JAK/AQ, you know what to expect - a light, breezy read. It doesn't get bogged down anywhere, but neither does it delve particularly deeply into any of the characters or events.