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The Protector's War

The Protector's War

Written by S.M. Stirling

Narrated by Todd McLaren


The Protector's War

Written by S.M. Stirling

Narrated by Todd McLaren

ratings:
4/5 (25 ratings)
Length:
21 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jun 30, 2008
ISBN:
9781400176779
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Rising from the ashes of the computer and industrial ages is a brave new world. Survivors have banded together in tribal communities, committed to rebuilding society. In Oregon's Willamette Valley, former pilot Michael Havel's Bearkillers are warriors of renown. Their closest ally, the mystical Clan MacKenzie, is led by Wiccan folksinger Juniper MacKenzie. Their leadership has saved countless lives.



But not every leader has altruistic aspirations. Norman Arminger, medieval scholar, rules the Protectorate. He has enslaved civilians, built an army, and spread his forces from Portland through most of western Washington State. Now he wants the Willamette Valley farmland, and he's willing to wage war to conquer it.



Unknown to both factions is the imminent arrival of a ship from Tasmania bearing British soldiers…
Publisher:
Released:
Jun 30, 2008
ISBN:
9781400176779
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

A well-regarded author of alternate history science-fiction novels, S.M. Stirling has written more than twenty-five books, including acclaimed collaborations with Anne McCaffrey, Jerry Pournelle, and David Drake. His most recent novels are T2: Infiltrator, The Peshawar Lancers, and the Island in the Sea of Time trilogy.


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Reviews

What people think about The Protector's War

4.2
25 ratings / 14 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    It is year 8, after The Change. People are trying to survive, relearning how to grow their own food, protect themselves from marauders and warlords. The Bear Killer Clan and Clan Mackenzie are separate but close, with a mutual pact to assist when the self-styled Protector once again sends his forces to conquer them.Lots of details with regard to primitive survival, and a surprisingly strong emphasis on worship of the Goddess. Characters are well drawn and strong, and the plot is clear and pointed, with one small exception at the end.It has cliff hangers though so beware. I'm having to hurry up and read the next book in the series right now!
  • (3/5)
    So while i did like it; i'm only giving it a 3 due to too much repetition with the whole witches thang; gets old really quickly jamming it down our throats; seriously give it a rest; actually takes away from the story; however I loved love loved 2 quotes from the book; when Havel says "my son my son" after the horse thing; and when; Stirling did a take of of Eastwood's Dirty Harry famous magnum quote; awesome!!!
  • (4/5)
    Really enjoyed this book in the series and look forward to moving on to the next. There were some interesting twists that were uncovered in this sequel and I really enjoyed it. A couple of moments were a little predictable, which is why I gave it 4 stars.
  • (4/5)
    10/2011 I liked this better the second time through. I was less caught up in the suspense and could pay more attention to the subtleties and character development.

    12/2010 Solid second book in the series. Of necessity a little plodding, but still gripping nonetheless. The characters are strong, the world-building excellent, and the homage to Tolkien well-done indeed. The astronomical body count and the graphic descriptions of up-close war are, well, graphic. Yet in context it's believable, and not gratuitous.
  • (5/5)
    Original given the series to read by my son, awhile ago. Purchased the series, to have in my own library. What would you do if there was no power, gunpowder doesn't work and machinery will not work. You are forced back to the time of swords and bow and arrows. It's a time of fight or die to survive. Its an interesting journey and will keep you riveted to the books to see how it unfolds. Excellent books. Well written.
  • (3/5)
    Almost as engaging as the first novel, but somewhat more focused on the day to day life of these new societies as they prepare for war and settle the lands that surround them. The novel is more based on skirmish warfare between The protectorate and those in the Willamette Valley. The inclusion of the Lorings and John Hordle was very enjoyable. Also, the development of the Dunedain was interesting as well. A good read, but not as entertaining as Dies The Fire.
  • (3/5)
    While I didn't enjoy this book as much as its predecessor Dies the Fire, I enjoyed it very much. The glimpse into years past the initial change in the universal laws is hopefully leading to a book that will be as compelling as the first was. That said, this was still a good book.
  • (4/5)
    It was interesting to read this immediately after "How to Read Novels Like a Professor." I quickly noticed how Stirling violated convention by sharing several of the main characters' thoughts (written in italics). It worked here because so much of the meaning comes from the interactions between people and the cultural dynamics in this post-Change world. All 486 pages pass quickly through non-stop action in 3 different locations. It's mostly an escapist piece, but I do find this series offers thoughtful contemplation about the factors that drive history.
  • (4/5)
    As the second book in the "Change" series, Stirling continues to deliver in the highly speculative setting set in the Pacific Northwest. I have loved reading this series, mainly because I am familiar with many of the place settings where the adventure unfolds. Furthermore, Stirling scratches the itch in all nerds and geeks that ask themselves "what if present day humanity was thrust back two hundred years, technologically speaking, in the blink of an eye". Not everyone would appreciate this plot nor his style of writing, but if you like the first book, you will love the rest of the series.
  • (5/5)
    An English nobleman and his family flee their home country and come into the main story in Oregon - meeting first one 'side' int he conflict, then settling with the other. Both sides are gearing up for war.
  • (3/5)
    The Protector's War takes place 9 years after the events of Dies the Fire. The Bearkillers and the Mackenzies have built up very successful communities in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, but the Protectorate has been successful as well, and threatens war on its independent neighbors. The pacing of this book was slow, and despite the name of the title, a war does not take place. Apart from a couple skirmishes with the Protectorate, very little happens. It felt as though the entire book was simply a set up for A Meeting at Corvallis. The lack of progression made the story a little difficult to enjoy, but hopefully it will the next book will have made the journey worth it.
  • (5/5)
    The second of the series originating with "Dies the Fire" (which has been dubbed the Emberverse setting by some) continues the story of an Earth where the laws of physics have changed irrevocably for some unexplained reason, causing electrical systems, internal combustion, and other high technology devices to fail. This story takes place eight and nine years after the start of the first novel.Stirling chooses a split narrative for this entry, telling several stories at once in alternating chapters. He then frames all the stories together by gathering the main characters together in a tavern (this would be hackneyed for something like a D&D session, but here it works fairly well). This may be tedious to some readers. It is a common device, but if you find one plotline more interesting than another, you might find the story drags in places.Finally, we see more of the Changed world, far beyond the Willamette Valley. The first 50 pages of the book, in fact, take place in the British Isles with new and engaging heroes seeking escape from the increasingly erratic monarchy. Stirling was clearly channeling British adventure fiction authors in this section, Talbot Mundy and others. It certainly has a "King of the Khyber Rifles" feel to it. This book is an improvement over Dies the Fire in several ways, it contains just as much action, more characters, and broader scope. He also toned down the Full-Frontal Paganism that I felt bogged down the narrative. He also subtlety moves the tone of the story away from its post-apocalyptic roots and more into more of a fantasy story. Neo-fantasy, is that a genre? Certain sections delve right into magical realism, in fact.Unresolved plot lines and the prospect of even more epic battles are bound to leave you anxious for the third in the series, "Meeting in Corvallis".
  • (4/5)
    This second novel in S. M. Stirling’s series moved somewhat away from its hard post-apocalyptic roots, but was none the less an entertaining read. Stirling uses a nice quickly paced writing style to weave his tale of small community structures, myth, spirituality and warfare that is easy and pleasant to read. The second novel jumps forward eight years from the time of "The Change", starting with a somewhat shocking storyline from the Isle of Britain. New characters arise from this storyline and are woven in to storylines that follow our original heroes and villains from Dies the Fire. Some characters from the original, while still appearing in this sequel, have moved far into the background, such as Eric Larson and his wife Luanne. Others are brought more into the foreground such as The Lord Protector, Astrid Larson and Eilir. While definitely a fun read, the only troublesome thing about this installation was the fact that broad storylines were left completely unresolved. While waiting for resolutions in sequels can be exciting and invigorating, my concern is that this series will devolve into another monstrosity of Jordanian proportions (I long a ago gave up on his Wheel of Time series), where storylines are drug on continuously to no end, and concepts are flogged like a long dead horse. So far not the case for Sterling’s series, but something to keep an eye on as our tale of a new society continues to unfold.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting plot device, fairly well-written and well-thought out. It is a bit contrived, but I freely admit that I have not been able to put down any of the books in the series, and that as I finished each one I nervously began making mental lists of necessary survival gear for when the lights go out for good.