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Another Pan

Another Pan


Another Pan

ratings:
3.5/5 (9 ratings)
Length:
10 hours
Released:
Oct 26, 2010
ISBN:
9781423399544
Format:
Audiobook

Description

In this pulse-quickening sequel to Another Faust, an ancient Egyptian spell is turning the tony Marlowe School into a sinister underworld. Will all hell break loose?

Sixteen-year-old Wendy Darling and her insecure freshman brother, John, are hitting the books at the Marlowe School. But one tome consumes their attention: The Book of Gates, a coveted Egyptian artifact that their professor father believes has magical powers. Soon Wendy and John discover that the legend is real-when they recite from its pages and descend into a snaking realm beneath the Manhattan school. As the hallways darken, and dead moths cake the floor, a charismatic new R.A. named Peter reveals that their actions have unleashed a terrible consequence: the underworld and all its evil is now seeping into Marlowe. Daniel Nayeri and Dina Nayeri return to reimagine Peter Pan as a twisty, atmospheric, and fast-paced fantasy about the perils of immortality.

Released:
Oct 26, 2010
ISBN:
9781423399544
Format:
Audiobook


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What people think about Another Pan

3.4
9 ratings / 8 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    Lots of action in this retelling of the Peter Pan story. Egyptian mythology is at the center of a magical mystery at a NYC boarding school.
  • (4/5)
    Reason for Reading: Next in the series.I loved this book almost as much as the first in the series! In fact, I think I loved the story even more but I didn't find it to be the page-turner that Another Faust was. This was more of a slow read, one that kept me interested and I loved falling into the world, but somehow it did have a slow pace. I'm not sure if this is the book's fault or my own as my mind has been all over the place so close to Christmas. But fast or slow paced who cares? I loved Another Pan!Professor Darling is a teacher at the Marlowe school. Both his children attend, Wendy and John Darling; this is his first year at the high school. There are a few new Resource Assistants this year and one them is named Peter. Professor Darling's history class revolves around Ancient Egyptology and a particular set of 5 myths and artifacts in which he alone believes prove that the Egyptian god of the Dead was not Anubis but a female. Peter is at the school looking for bonedust from a certain set of 5 mummies which when ground together will provide the elixir of permanent youth. So far he's managed to slow the aging process considerably with the dust from one such special mummy. It seems the underworld has attached itself to Marlowe along with a new mousy, plain looking school nurse with a strange eye. Wendy and John join Peter and his crew of Lost Boys (in place all over the world and naturally at Marlowe as well) in entering the underworld and trying to retrieve the mummies and fighting (or tricking) the guardians of each after they hear and study each myth to help them locate the point of entry in Marlowe to the correct place in the underworld.It is with the nurse that the connection with the previous book comes. Another Faust introduced us to the demon posing as a governess and here she returns before she has had time to fully recuperate in the form of the nurse. This is all covered in the first chapter. But when she returns to the underworld she regains her full power as the Dark Lady. The Dark Lady has taken on many manifestations in the living world, the glamorous governess in Another Faust and the terrible, frightening nanny of Peter's childhood.I love how all the elements of the Peter Pan story are brought together here in a completely different fashion. Peter Pan is represented in his true form (from the book) as a nasty, self-centred youth and his sidekick who is in love with him, Tina, will do anything for him even though he does not reciprocate her undying love. Tina, like Tinkerbell (in the book) is jealous of Wendy with a pure hatred. Other elements that find their way into Another Pan but have nothing to do with pirates or crocodiles are the hook and the tick-tock of a watch. Truly, a very original re-imagining of the ingredients that make up Peter Pan that the authors have used in a completely unique way to tell their own story.As a series, I find this very compelling as it does not follow the same cookie cutter recipe of most series. There is not a continuing plot line with the same characters. In fact, these first two books could be read on their own, apart from a series. What connects them as a series is a villain and a school, which is becoming a character itself. There is also a very brief mention in passing of an event that happened last year at the school involving Christopher Faust and connecting it to the evil within Marlowe.I'm a fan of this series and can't wait to see what classic story the brother/sister author team use as the springboard for the next book.
  • (2/5)
    I must say that Daniel & Dina Nayeri are very talented in recreating well-known classic stories. First with Another Faust and now with Another Pan they were able to showcase how talented they really are in giving these classic tales a more modern spin. As a fan of fairytale and classic remakes this definitely appealed to my senses.You'll recognize all the characters in this story - Peter, the Lost Boys, Wendy and John Darling - yep, they're all in there. Now combine those characters with Egyptian curses, a posh New York school, and you'll find yourselves on a whole new adventure.I must admit that I was not a fan of Another Faust - I read it and, sadly, I did not like it. So when I heard of Another Pan, I decided to give the Nayeri's one more chance at winning me over. While there were many aspects of the novel that I did enjoy - the romance between Peter and Wendy, the modern-ness of the whole thing, I loved that the Lost Boys would text "happy thoughts", even the mystery of the The Book of Gates and how it played into the storyline - I still did not fall for this book... and I'll explain why. Firstly, it started off really slow. I mean I was 100 pages in and it was still very slow for me. Secondly, I really liked Wendy as a character - she was strong, faithful, she had charisma, was quirky and I really liked that she stood her ground when she believed in something. This is the Wendy you meet for the first half of the book. Somewhere along the way we lose that Wendy. For the second half of the book I found her to be whiny, she forgets about her wishes, dreams, etc. and somehow her thoughts only revolve around Peter... this really annoyed me. I hate that girls will drop everything at the drop of a hat for a guy... ugh. Then there was John Darling - my gosh that boy was driving me insane. He used too much slang and was just too annoying for his own good.I loved the idea of this book. The premise was fantastic- and the Peter Pan-ness of it was what really seduced me into reading it. But in the end it just didn't work for me. For those of you wondering - this is the second book in Daniel & Dina Nayeri's "Another" series. The first being Another Faust. Some of the characters from Another Faust make cameo appearances and the school where Wendy and John go to is the same one (Marlowe) from Another Faust as well - but that's where the similarities end. So, no, you do not have to read Another Faust in order to enjoy Another Pan.
  • (5/5)
    This is one of my favorite book I have read this year. The way the authors mixed the old stories together was amazing. I saw how this story was like Peter Pan and yet its own story. The way it was written made me feel as if I am the characters experiencing each emotion. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in Egyptian folklore and just folklore in general.
  • (3/5)
    Again, I lament Goodreads' lack of half star ratings. While parts of this book were compelling, overall, the book suffered from a few faults. The first in the series, Another Faust, held my interest. Another Pan did not.

    The link between Peter Pan and its retelling worked in some spots and felt weak in others. Overall, the book seemed to lack a stronger sense of cohesion. Peter's essential selfishness, particularly when it came to Wendy, was heartbreaking. I didn't want to believe that of him. Then again, he falls in love with her daughter too in Peter Pan canon, so...

    Now I'm hesitant about reading Another Jekyll, because this book wasn't as powerful as I'd expected. Pity, that.
  • (4/5)
    Review courtesy of Dark Faerie Tales.Quick & Dirty: Myth, fairy tale, contemporary high school drama, and the paranormal combine in a fast-paced and chilling adventure through space and time.Opening Sentence: All nights come to an end–that is to say, all nights see the break of day.The Review:By far my favorite of the Another series for several reasons. Daniel and Dina Nayeri built on the first book of the series but added so much more. Familiarity with the story of Peter Pan definitely added to the enjoyment of this book. The authors were able to take a basic storyline, combine it with their original premise, and turn it into something that is everything the first book was missing. The characters are much more believable, there is mortal peril, and in general, there is just a lot more going on to keep the reader entertained. This book can stand alone apart from the series without losing much understanding, but because there are actual, but somewhat vague, references to the Egyptian myth in Another Faust, the plot for Another Pan seems to make more sense as a whole as part of the series. Although this book was longer in pages, it was a page-turner and did not take long to read.Peter is, as he should be, the intriguing character of this book. He is so charismatic that he even has an actual following of lost boys, plus Tina, who is loyal to a fault and comes complete with a envy of Wendy. Peter is updated to modern times, and has a fancy cell phone to prove it. He, along with the other characters, is surprisingly believable, even given his youthful demeanor. Although Peter seems perhaps more selfish than he does in the fairy tale, his own upbringing by his “nanny” make his situation seem especially plausible. And this slightly darker version of Peter just seems to fit right into this slightly darker fairy tale of a book.Wendy and John have some serious flaws, not damning flaws as we saw with the teenagers in Another Faust, but regular, trying to fit in, trying to find romance, trying not to be too nerdy, regular teenager flaws that any and all teenagers have and therefore, we all can relate to. They are also wishing for something more exciting, a way to escape the mundane high school problems, and they find exactly that. What really drives the book is their eagerness to please someone they both look up to as a hero, to the point that they make some pretty stupid choices, just to be a part of something rebellious and fun. Their relationship with their father is definitely relatable and realistic. He is the opposite of cool and the opposite of rebellion, and his children suck up just enough to not get in serious trouble, but go behind his back at every turn. The only part I found slightly annoying is that Wendy and John’s last name is actually Darling and a lot of attention was drawn to that, which made me wish the connection was just a little toned down in that aspect.In addition to the Peter Pan premise, and keeping in line with Madame Vileroy, who turns out to have many personas and goes by several names, the authors have thrown in a series of Egyptian myths, which miraculously, actually fit into the rest of the story line without compromising the integrity of the rest of the book. Everyone’s past and how they fit into the storyline is explained by the end of the book, which just makes the reader feel like they were a part of this adventure. Everything goes so well together, this time the well-educated authors create something that is delightful for teens and adults alike. There is definitely a creepiness factor to this book. Still not too creepy, but a little creepier than the first book in the series, Another Faust. Without giving anything away, especially the part where the hook comes in, this book gets pretty creepy but without trying too hard. That’s mostly just how Another Pan is in general, it is just superb how the authors did so much without making it seem like it is trying to hard.Notable Scene:Wendy and John turned back down the all, toward the exit. as they crept quietly along, Wendy’s eyes kept darting back and forth, trying to spot the source of that feeling of almost being touched. Suddenly, in the shadowy far end of the dark hall, a hooded figure seemed to appear. Someone small, a woman or a girl, glided into their line of vision gracefully, like a witch, then just as quickly disappeared into one of the classrooms. Before the phantom was gone, Wendy thought she saw her turn, and she glimpsed a broken blue eye–like one she thought she had seen somewhere before . . . but where? Maybe on TV? Or on someone she had forgotten, someone unremarkable and small . . . someone easily forgettable in the course of her important daily routines. An eye not quite human. The sight of it made all the blood in Wendy’s body go ice cold, full of jagged edges pricking from the inside. She wanted to scream, but she held back. They stumbled backward into the main corridor toward the barricaded door.
  • (1/5)
    A re-telling of Peter Pan set in Modern Day New York What I liked: The story had the same characters names as another book I enjoyed. What I didn’t like: Everything!!! Even though there was a fantasy element of the book, (going into the underworld in Egypt) there was no magic or whimsy with this book. The characters were very jaded and not developed fully and I really didn’t like that fact that so many of the themes in Peter Pan were ignored or perverted. I would be hard press to find redeeming qualities in this book to recommend it to a teen.
  • (3/5)
    Lots of action in this retelling of the Peter Pan story. Egyptian mythology is at the center of a magical mystery at a NYC boarding school.