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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Written by Mark Twain

Narrated by Jack Lemmon


The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Written by Mark Twain

Narrated by Jack Lemmon

ratings:
4/5 (161 ratings)
Length:
2 hours
Released:
Jun 1, 2000
ISBN:
9780743568159
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

A true classic, a search for America's soul is given the reading of a lifetime by one of America's finest actors—two-time Academy Award winner Jack Lemmon.

Floating on a raft down the Mississippi with Jim, an escaping slave, Lemmon's Huck finds adventure, danger and a cast of characters who are both menacing and hilarious.

Produced in a simple manner that allows imaginations to soar, Mark Twain's marvelous, enduring wit will charm the entire family. Destined to become an instant classic, this audiobook will help introduce your entire family to the unique pleasure of classic literature.

Released:
Jun 1, 2000
ISBN:
9780743568159
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Mark Twain, who was born Samuel L. Clemens in Missouri in 1835, wrote some of the most enduring works of literature in the English language, including The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc was his last completed book—and, by his own estimate, his best. Its acquisition by Harper & Brothers allowed Twain to stave off bankruptcy. He died in 1910. 

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Reviews

What people think about The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

3.9
161 ratings / 321 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    A nicely bound, nicely printed, edition of Huckleberry Finn, this time by an Indian publisher and printer. The validity and accuracy of this edition yet to be determined.
  • (3/5)
    This book is quite humourous and satirical, and for the most part, it's quite fun to read. I did zone out for a bit in the middle there, losing interest when it wasn't about Huck's tomfoolery, but I greatly enjoyed the parts with Tom. The relationship between Huck and Tom is quite interesting and captivating, and really elevates the story itself.
  • (3/5)
    Re-reading since high school. Good classic!
  • (4/5)
    While I really enjoyed this book, the constant use of the word nigger made me really uncomfortable. I know that during the time that the book was both written and set it was in common usage and I also know that if the book had been edited to remove any offensive terms then I wouldn't have read it because then it wouldn't have been Twain's work. Other than that I found this to be a really well written and engrossing read, couldn't put it down. Confession time - I am 37 years old and this is the first Mark Twain book I have read but I am looking forward to reading more.
  • (5/5)
    matters appear hysterical on goodreads these days. Ripples of concern often appear daunting to the literate, cushioned by their e-devices and their caffienated trips to dusty book stores; why, the first appearence of crossed words often sounds like the goddamn apocalypse. Well, it can anyway. I find people are taking all of this way too seriously.

    I had a rough day at work. It is again hot as hell outside and I just wanted to come home and listen to chamber music and read Gaddis until my wife comes home. Seldom are matters that simple. It is within these instances of discord that I think about Pnin. I love him and the maestro's creation depicting such. I situate the novel along with Mary and The Gift in my personal sweet cell of Nabokov, insulated well away from Lolita and Ada, perhaps drawing strength from Vladimir's book on Gogol, though certainly not his letters with Bunny Wilson. It is rare that I can think about Pnin washing dishes and not tear up. I suppose I'll survive this day as well.
  • (4/5)
    Emily GooseAmerican LiteratureMrs. J. Clark Evans27 August 2007Reaction to A Walk to Remember by Nicholas SparksNicholas Sparks’s A Walk to Remember is a heart wrenching story about a young, first love and heartbreak. While this may sound like a traditional love story, this novel was nothing of the sort. I laughed, cried, and took time to dwell on the storyline. At times I put the book down to think, ponder, and imagine “what if.” Sparks writes about two seventeen year olds, Landon Carter and Jamie Sullivan, who live in Beaufort, North Carolina and find themselves unexpectedly in love. Landon was a typical rule-breaking, willing-to-do-anything-for-fun teenager, while Jamie was anything but. She carried her bible wherever she went, wore a plaid skirt with a sweater and a smile everyday, spent time weekly at the local orphanage, and said “hello” to every person she passed by, “just because.” Through a school play and periodical conversations on her front porch, they slowly grew quite fond of each other. It wasn’t long until they spent all their time together and Landon was falling for the girl he had once spent time making fun of. Throughout the formation of their friendship, however, Jamie had been keeping something from him. She had been diagnosed with leukemia six months previous and the side effects were worsening as the days passed. With the secret out, the two faced monumental hurdles together and their lives were changed forever. While they knew their love was special, strong, and impossible to let go of, they were aware that their time together was quickly coming to an end. A surprising conclusion led the reader to believe that miracles can and do happen, one just needs to look deep for them. Sparks has a way of making every story he writes easy to connect to, even if the reader has never experienced what he’s writing about. His word choice is descriptive, picture-painting and mind boggling. The plot twisted and turned throughout the story, keeping the reader guessing to the very end. Jamie and Landon’s story is one that I will not soon forget. Their strength together in the situation they were in was truly admirable. I believe that young love is a rare and extraordinary occurrence. Sparks sent a message to the reader that if it happens, to hold it tight and value it because it may never happen again. I recommend Nicholas Sparks’s A Walk to Remember to all readers who are willing to let themselves cry and genuinely appreciate a one-of-a-kind love story.
  • (5/5)
    Truly deserves its status as an American classic.
  • (4/5)
    Yet another banned book that kicks ass.
  • (5/5)
    (Original Review, 1981-03-18)I guess “Ulysses” pushes the envelope of “Literature was made for man, not man for literature” but I like to give the benefit of the doubt to books especially if not only do they have a sustained critical reputation, but if people whose opinions I respect think the book is great stuff. When I was venting some of my frustration about “Ulysses” and “Finnegans Wake” to a well-read musician friend, she just gently suggested that if I let myself listen to the music of the language it might change my perception. When it comes to ”Finnegans Wake” I couldn’t do it…I’m still deaf.I guess Huck is a little trying as a voice, especially in the beginning, but I think it is one of the greatest books ever written, or I ever read. Tom Sawyer is OK, but HF is brilliant. In the most direct way possible Huck learns about the absolute humanity of Jim but also Huck feels guilty because Jim is property and in the South, being property trumped being human. In its quiet, folksy way it presents us with something intensely evil face to face with something just as intensely familiar and homey. All those people, many of them, are such fine nice people so vividly portrayed as such, except that the vilest evil that they live with every day, and have created and sustain, is totally invisible to them. As a really human document, a damning one, it has never been done so well and so quietly. Freud drew attention to the uncanny in his short but influential essay, as having just that quality of being so homey and yet being alien, so human but so inhuman.Not totally sure about the ending though; it was contrived in a way, BUT I was very impressed by the late chapter scene where the doctor, clearly a good and fine man, will not go seek help for a sick child because he was afraid that Jim might run off. Again that MONSTRUOUS blindness vs the child. And the scene where the men, the good folks of the town, were talking about what to do with Jim, some wanting to lynch him, not for running away, but because of his ingratitude!!! And then deciding not to kill him because after all he is someone's property and they might be held liable for his dollars’ worth!!! Nevertheless Huck comes of age.I would agree more with the idea that all American fiction is a response to Huck Finn if it hadn't been Hemingway who said it, but I will not accept that anyone else could possibly admire the book more than I do. Still, the ending is the weakest part. I don't know who could have written a better ending but facts are facts and by the time we get to the last few chapters the really astonishing novelties have already been spent where they'd do the most good.
  • (4/5)
    We read it in the great books class. It was a good book. I would read it again.
  • (3/5)
    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a tough classic to rate. The story is written entirely from Huck’s point of view, which I loved. He speaks to his reader no differently than if I were in the presence of a friend, listening to a telling. Mark Twain has the language of the time and class perfectly on spot.The trouble that I had was that as an adult reader who was reading it in its entirety, it became boringly repetitive at times. It is a story more suitable to reading by the chapter to a young child, but… There is a problem with that as well. The book is not appropriate for a young person either, since the lines of prejudice may be overwhelming with the use of the “N-word” on a regular basis. Now, I am not complaining about that. Taking into account of when the book was written and the time period of the story, it is historically correct. I don’t think that we can pretend that history didn’t happen if we are to learn anything from it. It’s just that I don’t know where this book fits in for today’s reader, which makes it unusual in of itself.
  • (5/5)
    I guess this is the summer of reading classic books. People already know the story from all of the various movies and Wishbone episodes. So I won't dwell on the plot too much. There's intrigue and secret pacts and rafts and steamboats and scams. Huck always seems to find the craziest events on the Mississippi.

    The best part of this is that it's written in various dialects. Huck's narrator voice is at least easy enough to understand, but lots of times I found myself reading things aloud to even figure out what some other character was saying. It really gives you a feel for the time period, more than any description would. I feel like I have a better understanding of the South now.

    I can see why people don't want this to be read in present-day schools, or prefer to read Tom Sawyer's adventures instead. Everyone says the n-word ALL THE TIME. I get it that it was the culture, that it is a historical piece, but it would make reading aloud in class quite difficult. This book has an undercurrent of racism and morality that is definitely more thought-providing my though.
  • (5/5)
    One frequently challenged American classic is Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain (Samuel Clemons.) The reasons for challenging it are various. It uses the "n-word" to refer to African-Americans of the pre-Civil War period. Huck Finn makes an important choice in the course of the book, in which he defies the law and the moral injunctions of his elders, and is shown as being right to do so. America of the pre-Civil War period is portrayed as being less than perfect--a long way less than perfect.

    The story of Huckleberry Finn is simple; in fact, the Author's Note at the beginning threatens dire consequences for anyone claiming to identify a plot in the book. Huck, having come into money in an earlier book, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, has been placed in the custody of the Widow Douglas, who is attempting to civilize him. He appreciates her efforts, but feels confined. The alternative, living with his abusive father, is even worse. Huck runs away, heads down the Mississippi River--and meets up with the Widow Douglas' slave, Jim, who has also run away. They raft down the Mississippi together, with Huck getting an education about people, relations between black and white, and injustice. In the end they are back in the fictional town of St. Petersburg, MO, with Jim recaptured and set to be sold. Huck has a difficult choice to make.

    This is not a grim book; it is lively and entertaining, and filled with adventures that any young or young-at-heart reader will enjoy. Huck learns a lot, though, and grows as a human being. This is an important book; it's also a fun one.

    Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: In the book The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Huckleberry Finn is faced with many decisions.One of them that he often faces is to follow his friends or not.Because sometimes that can lead him into trouble. In one adventure that he goes on is trying to free a slave. This leads him into some trouble with some people that he stayed overnight with. Who tell him if he sees a slave to bring it up the river because their is a cash reward. while they are talking about it the slave he is he's helping is sleeping on the raft they are traveling on. I enjoyed this book! I read it in high school and was confused but read it again a year ago and loved it. Very brilliant. I would use this book in a classroom by letting them watch the movie and ask questions afterward on how it affected them.
  • (3/5)
    There was no way I was ever going to say anything in this review other than 'Huck Finn is pretty over-rated.' My wife could have told you that; my sister-in-law could have told you; my dog could have told you in a long paw-written letter. So there you go. There is something brilliant about the novel: basically, Twain created one of the great narrative voices of all time, up there with the narrator of Tom Jones, of the Magic Mountain, even, dare I say it, Proust's narrator. And the jokes are pretty funny. On the downside, Twain doesn't evade the problem of all first-person narrative: the voice is shaped by the character of the narrator/protagonist at the time of the book's action, not by his presumably more stable character at the time of narration.

    It's incredible, too, that serious and intelligent people take this book as a kind of cultural touchstone. First off, it's almost entirely literary burlesque, quite well done, although not as funny as, say, Northanger Abbey, which burlesques more or less the same kind of gothic/adventure nonsense. Surely most of the people who read this haven't read Dumas or any of the yet-worse nineteenth century garbage that Twain is, quite rightly, mocking.

    Second, burlesque aside, the content of the book is intellectually barren. Sure, America, like Huck, is caught between the urge for 'authentic' nature and the urge for 'respectable' civility. But 'immeasurable richness,' as Penguin press claims in its blurb? Deep symbolic significance? Really? And the less said about the home-spun common-sense American wisdom the better.

    But there is a lot going on, and it's well worth reading. Twain's scenes will probably stick in my mind, as will the brilliant narrative voice.
  • (1/5)
    I have been assigned this book several times, and i have to say it is just awful. I don't care what anyone says, it's plain racist and there isn't even a good story to redeem it. WHY WOULD A RUNAWAY SLAVE GO SOUTH?!?! The dialects make it a chore to read, and for the life of me I can't understand why it is a 'classic.'
    I have made it a life goal to never read this book. That's how much I loathe its existence.
    The end.
  • (4/5)
    Tom Sawyer's behavior at the end seriously annoyed me!
  • (5/5)
    The book club I belong to does a great job of selecting from a fairly wide sampling of genres. This month we return to the classics with what many see as the definitive example of the Great American Novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It really is a classic and it really is a great read and I enjoyed it so much more than I thought I would. It is so much more satisfying to read "just because," rather than to analyze and look for support for the thesis of the paper one has to write.Huck is the son of the town drunk in a small Missouri community in the pre-Civil War era. His character, prominent in a previous Twain novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, now gets a chance to tell his own story, and what a story it is. Huck has lived with and without his abusive father, and is pretty philosophical about taking the lickings that his dad is prone to give when he is drinking. When his father disappears for awhile at the end of the Tom Sawyer novel, Huck is informally adopted by a local Christian woman who sees her mission as civilizing the boy. As Huck's adventures begin, dad reappears and "kidnaps" Huck, with a plan to take Huck's part of the money which Huck and Tom received at the end of Tom's adventure, and the drunken abusive cycle begins again. Huck's philosophy of life is thus shaped, not only by his father's self-serving jaded attitude, but by the principles of his adoptive family, and the cultural mores of the times. Huck is an independent thinker and has become very adept at stretching the truth (lying), to deal with his day to day life. He has also learned to read people, identifying the genuine good people as well as the frauds and con artists that he meets.Circumstances bring him and the runaway slave Jim together when Huck orchestrates his "death" so that he can escape from his father. At the same time, Jim overhears that the widow lady who owns him is planning to sell him, thus separating him from his family. The two, both intent on escaping oppression/finding freedom, float down the Mississippi on a raft where Huck comes to see what a loyal and good man Jim is, and struggles with the cultural attitude of his time which is that he should do what he can to aid Jim's rightful owner in getting her property back. Twain is a master at capturing the life and the characters that inhabit the towns along the river as well as spinning a mesmerizing tale, as seen through the eyes and told with the voice and the perspective of a young boy, haphazardly educated, thankfully, so that his native wisdom overrules what he believes society requires of him when the really hard choices have to be made. Twain's satirical take on humanity and his incredible ear for dialect make this wonderful discussion group fodder and I am eager to participate in the upcoming discussion. This is a classic you should not miss
  • (3/5)
    I know this is supposed to be one of the all-time classic books, but despite it's memorable scenes I still found it very flawed. I realized that Twain was writing in a different time, but I still find the character of Jim to be a bad stereotype of an uneducated slave. The book's ending, with the arrival of Tom Sawyer, is also a serious flaw.
  • (5/5)
    Definitely one of my absolute favourites.
  • (4/5)
    Now this was a book that I could enjoy reading! It's about time! What I love the most about Huck Finn is that it's a simple story, with nothing too over the top plot-wise. You've just got a kid who ran away from home, floating down the Mississippi River on a raft with a slave who's running away because he heard he was going to be sold down South. And, well, that's about it! They talk, they run into people, they experience different adventures based on the towns they pass and the people in them, and it's a learning and growing experience for our main character, Huck, which says a great deal for those of us who have experienced the single-mindedness of Tom Sawyer. *Snorts* For one thing, when Tom Sawyer appears in this book the couple of times you see him, not only are you shocked by the manner of his thinking and the utter nonsense he pulls everyone into, but it just made me mad that he was so over-the-top and made everything a MILLION times more complicated than it needed to be! Arg! Okay, so towards the end it all played out for the best, perhaps. But STILL. The kid needs to seriously be smacked upside the head for being such a jerk of things! He's a smart kid, and he knows how to take advantage of others. That's been his thing since anyone's first met the character. But it can get reaaaally frustrating to those of us that don't know that we're being put on or why we're doing things so lengthy and miserably intense when the easy solution is sitting RIGHT THERE.

    I definitely feel that there was a great deal of charm to this book however. The way that Huck and Jim act and interact is always fun and delightful, and half the time it's a wonder watching Huck learn so much from being with Jim over this long journey. You get to just sit back and enjoy everything as it unfolds. And when there are intense, life-and-safety threatening things going on, you're pulled to the very edge of your seat with anxiety for these characters that have come to mean so much to you, that's you're almost unaware of how it happened or at what point you started to really and honestly care about them. But I think that's part of the charm of Mark Twain's writing here, because that's the exact same way that Huck experiences his attachment to Jim: not knowing if he cares, or how much he cares, until all these different events come along and put him in a hard place, where he has to make some life-changing decisions--not just for himself either, but ultimately for Jim as well. It shows his character, how strong he is, even when he feels he's lost most of the time, or guilty of one thing or another that is really tied to him in no way. We've got to remember that Huck's just a kid, but he's a kid going through some majorly adult decisions a lot of the time, and a kid that's been through a lot just from the way you see him react to certain things. This is a boy that's been around and knows the world, even if he isn't an expert in it, and even if he isn't the most educated.

    I think, in part, it's this lack of any strict education or upbringing that makes Huck the wonderful character that he is: because he's got much less to influence him besides his own feelings, and his own logic, and his heart. He's a kid that uses his brain, and that makes mistakes, but he sure as the sun rises does his best to figure his way out of things--and he CAN too, what's more! He's capable, even though he's nothing special at all. And it's this great ability of his to choose what he feels is best over anything else that truly made me admire his character.

    That's why, when Tom Sawyer got involved and Huck once again became a secondary, if not background character even, I was ROYALLY steamed! This was Huck's story! It's got HIS name on the book! And Tom Sawyer just has a way of waltzing in, destroying everything that we just achieved, and stealing not only the show but the spotlight itself--permanently. From the moment Tom once again enters the picture in the latter part of the book, we lose everything that we gained throughout the story, and that's what frustrates me so IMMENSELY. And it kills me too, because Huck just goes right along with it, like it's no big deal. He sits there and goes right back to thinking all those things he's been probably told all his life: that he was born bad and will stay bad; that he's not smart, and he'll never be smart enough to out-do others; that he's nothing special, and so he's not going to try to be anything special. And it just irks me to see him like that! I feel like if he had the chance to be on his own with Jim for a time longer, that he would have grown so much more, so that maybe someday, this attitude that he's nothing at all would disappear, and he'd take claim of the fact that he is somebody strong and worthwhile!

    Who knows what's going to happen from here though. Readers, I definitely think this is a book that most people can enjoy. It's got a few things in it that I think are meant to be blatantly grating and even insulting, but that's how we learn and begin to think, and I know that's how Mark Twain intended it to be read and thought about. Take a chance on it if you haven't read it before! It's one of the better reads in the batch of Classic literature we're all told to read, I feel! And I hope you enjoy it as much as I did~!
  • (4/5)
    This one took me a while to get through, but it was rewarding in the end. Huck is such a loveable character, from his innocence and naivety to the humour he brings throughout, he really is one the most memorable characters in the entirety of fiction. I really enjoyed the sections with the king and the duke, but it probably did take a turn for the worst towards the end I won't give it away but I nearly gave myself a headache from rolling my eyes.
  • (3/5)
    Definitely a classic to read!
  • (5/5)
    Simply wonderful.
  • (3/5)
    #2 of the Rory Gilmore ChallengeSo I'm going to go ahead and give this 3 stars because by the last 10 chapters I was pretty ready to be finished with it. I found myself intrigued by the plot by the middle of the book but found it hard to read for long periods. By the time I read 2 chapters I was kind of ready to move on to something else or fell asleep causing my long period in reading.I didn't read The Adventures of Tom Sawyer first, although it was referenced pretty highly in the first 5 chapters or so. If my TBR stack and library stack weren't so tall I'd have considered it. However, when Tom Sawyer appears in the last chapters of the book I'm really grateful I didn't go back. Did anyone else think Tom Sawyer was the MOST ANNOYING character in this book? Being a kid of the 80s I remember the Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Brad Renfro and Elijah Wood renditions of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer that came out all within a few years of each other. So, I was interested in reading the first published stories to see what I remembered and what was actually in the book. I read the Penguins Classics version that had additional notes for background on Twain's writing. I quite liked the intro that talked about Twain's reading history that helped influence pieces of the story. The plot - I liked the plot, except the end with Tom Sawyer. I had no idea it was so gory at parts, but I guess I always read the editions for kids. The King and Duke were quick-paced which I appreciated once I got there. Some of the small river plots were interesting but seemed somewhat far fetched for a novel so acclaimed for giving insight in the Mississippi culture of the 1800s. I definitely want to go back and read Twain's "Life on the Mississippi" novel now while taking a month-long trip (you know, as soon as I save $8000 to do so). The characters - Jim was quite simple and I thought Mark Twain may be more interested in developing the ties of slavery through his character rather than the plot. Huck Finn's morale tests and self-talk were amusing, wish there had been a bit more. Maybe I'm a character-driven reader these days?All-in-all as a historical piece I enjoyed the context of the Mississippi River and the almost short story excerpts of river life. However, the novel dragged a bit for me to really enjoy it more and seemed to be a bit all over the place with Twain's style.
  • (4/5)
    Better than I expected.
  • (5/5)
    Classic read for many high school students. Huck is one of literature's great characters. He is street smart and dishonest, but loyal (to an extent). His relationship with Jim has stood the test of time. Personally, I think it has one of literature's best ending to any book I have ever read. I would recommend this for upper level high school readers. The language is difficult because of the southern accent. I recommend reading many sections aloud or reading along with an audio version to begin with.
  • (5/5)
    I could read this book once a year for the rest of my life. I think it may be my absolute favorite.
  • (5/5)
    A classic worthy of the name - and you get something new every time you read it.
  • (5/5)
    I have always enjoyed the humor of Mark Twain but have only read two of his novels.I had started this book a few times but never got interested in it and put it down. This time I started by listening to an audio version and finished it by going back and forth between audio and print.I enjoyed the book very much. It was originally an adventure story for young adults and now it is a classic of American historical fiction showing warts and all what this country was like.Reading the book helped me to appreciate how important the Mississippi River was in shaping the lives of millions of Americans since that area was settled. The river is a focal point for the action in the book and the lives of the characters in the book are intertwined together around the river. For me one of the most pleasant scenes in the book was Huck and Jim on the raft floating down the river at night looking up at the stars.The characters in the book are a cross sample of the people who lived beside and traveled on the river in that time period. Miss Watson, Aunt Polly and the Judge are examples of upright solid citizens and on the other end of the spectrum are Huck's Pap and the King and the Duke. Huckleberry Finn was my favorite character. Huck seemed pretty smart, a good friend, mostly honest and always trying to do the right thing if he could. The more I read about him the more complex and likable I found him.I don't think that Tom Sawyer holds a candle to Huck. Tom is well meaning but he gets real silly at times and everything in his world seems all about him and his crazy ideas.The author does an excellent job of making the reader a participant in Huck's adventures. The writing is clear and concise and the varied dialects add spice to the story. The main story is about Huck and Jim running away from Huck's Pap and Miss Watson. As this is proceeding there are various sidetracks that keep the story moving well. I was never sure how things would work out until the end but I always had a feeling from the author's tone in telling the story that all of the dangers would be overcome. The last adventure which is a Tom Sawyer special is a real hoot that gets funnier the more I think about it.Jim was portrayed as a good person but his character, the fact that he was a slave and always referred to as a nigger brought out the ugliness of racism in America. Jim was very childlike in his speech and his thoughts. An important aspect of American racism was that African-Americans didn't have the abilities of whites and needed to be taken care of. I grew up in an era when the word nigger was still used and I had to teach myself not to use it. Even when I hear it used by black people it is a derogatory term with offensive connotations. The worst part is that I cannot say that the author goes out of his way to be offensive or that his portrayal is not accurate. That is the way things were and I sometimes wonder if all the death and destruction of the Civil War wasn't the price that was paid for the shame of it all.All seriousness aside I thought this was a really good book and one I would consider to have the necessary attributes of a classic. There was adventure, joy, suspense and a happy ending. I look forward to reading some more of Mr. Twain's novels and reading this book again.