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Killing Time

Killing Time

Written by Caleb Carr

Narrated by Caleb Carr


Killing Time

Written by Caleb Carr

Narrated by Caleb Carr

ratings:
3/5 (19 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Released:
Nov 1, 2000
ISBN:
9780743566940
Format:
Audiobook

Description

The year is 2023, and much of the world enjoys great wealth generated by the triumph of information technology. However, the staphylococcus plague of 2006 wiped out 40 million people, and the 2020 assassination of American President Emily Forrester traumatized the nation. Through it all, the internet remains the main source of information, bombarding people with news, rumors and allegations twenty-four hours a day -- while creating enormous possibilities for the manipulation of mankind.

Into this world of deception wanders Dr. Gideon Wolfe, a New York psychiatrist, criminal profiler, and historian. Wolfe comes into possession of a computer disc that contains startling evidence that the now-famous visual record of President Forrester's assassination was digitally altered.

Stunned and enraged, Wolfe sets out to unravel the full tale of the Forrester hoax. His journey leads him to a secret group of scientific and military experts who seek to expose the astonishing degree to which the public can be deceived and manipulated in the Information Age. Wolfe joins the team and discovers that their efforts instigate the most horrendous single act of mass murder in world history. Relentlessly suspenseful, Killing Time reveals a new side of a master novelist.
Released:
Nov 1, 2000
ISBN:
9780743566940
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Caleb Carr is the critically acclaimed author of The Alienist, The Angel of Darkness, The Lessons of Terror, Killing Time, The Devil Soldier, The Italian Secretary, The Legend of Broken, and Surrender, New York. He has taught military history at Bard College, and worked extensively in film, television, and the theater. His military and political writings have appeared in numerous magazines and periodicals, among them The Washington Post, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. He lives in upstate New York.


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Reviews

What people think about Killing Time

2.8
19 ratings / 17 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (1/5)
    Horrible, horrible book!
  • (5/5)
    I am still in love with Malcolm Tressalian. I bought this book again when I lost my beloved large print edition in a move. It was worth it.
  • (4/5)
    Been sometime that I read it, but remember as a good read.
  • (3/5)
    Information deceit. Information overload has ruined the world. People just take theories and possibilites and consider them true before they are proved. Super intelligent twins decide to show the world the shortcomings of this system, and it backfires. Using time travel, he fixes things.
  • (3/5)
    Not as good as The Alienest
  • (1/5)
    Drivel. After reading his brilliant books (Alienist and Angel) I thought this was a HUGE disappointment. What happened??
  • (1/5)
    I feel very fortunate to have borrowed this book from the library vice buying a copy. Reading this book wasted my time. The central idea, that an information society has special vulnerability to propaganda and manipulation by elites, strikes me as counter-factual and condescending. As sermon, this book failed to convince me. As an adventure story, it failed to convince me. The idea of a secret elite with a high-technology airship manipulating the fate of the world's population lacks originality. (See Verne's Robur the Conqueror at Project Gutenberg.)The book's ending relies on deus ex machina, and one that lies off-stage. It failed to convince me. In fact, the author relies on the very same mechanism for the ending that he condemns throughout the rest of the book: manipulation by an elite.I can say only one positive thing about this book. I now know to avoid this author's work.
  • (2/5)
    Caleb Carr's vision of the future looks a lot like the Victorian era he writes about so well. While still a master word smith and story teller, Carr's version of the future is not as intriguing as other authors. The premise of the book, that the Internet is set up to deliberately disseminate *false* information could go along way to explaining the quality of information that is available now. Sadly, this cynical avenue is never fully exploited. While the story is still undeniably Caleb Carr, it is sadly no where near the equal of The Alienist.
  • (2/5)
    this book should be required reading. I greatly promoted this at Book Club. The Thought Police that we read about in 1984 are real now.
  • (1/5)
    Major disappointment from one of my favorite authors. Oh well. His other books are great.
  • (3/5)
    The year 2023, and information is everywhere: free flowing, abundant, instanteneous. But is all - or any - of it accurate? Criminal profiler and psychiatrist Dr.Gideon Wolfe is investigating the murder of a fried in New York City when suddenly he is caught up in the company of a beautiful woman, her ingenious brother, and a band of techno-terrorists at war with the world itself. While earth sags under the wight of violence, poverty and disease, one man has discovered the only way to save humangkind from itself. And with a little help from Gideon Wolfe, all it will take are a few little lies - and one astounding piece of truth.
  • (4/5)
    A book that still has me wondering, a polemic look into the future where the issues are more important than the thriller aspects, a story of love and tragedy and near-future nastiness. Written before 9-11 but some of the points are quite poignant!
  • (3/5)
    written in a (u/dys)topian literary style, which includes a typical banging of the ideologue drum. surprisingly perceptive, given that it was published in 2000, is talking about many of the things we deal with today - misinformation and dissemination of the "official story", privacy, corporate influences in politics, genetic engineering, pollution & climate change, water scarcity, even unmanned/ drone warfare. reads surprisingly quickly. nowhere near as shallow as reviews would have you believe. far from perfect, yet worth the read. full review coming later. deeply flawed in the way most literary dystopias are in that the tour of the conceived world takes precedence over plot.
  • (3/5)
    This is the first Carr novel that has been set in the future--the previous books I've read by him were all set in the past, and Carr worked hard to ensure the voice matched the period. So this book was obviously different.

    Another key difference is not writing in the historical fiction genre bit rather the dystopia genre instead. After recently reading Space Merchants, I was very aware of some of the similarities of the two books (since both have themes I am interested in, it worked out for me). I was also keenly interested in a future world where the US was at war with Afghanistan... Especially when the book was written in 1999-was the possibility of our going to war so obvious even then?

    Definitely a good read. Plus it has super awesome technology, fights, and even love.
  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    So-so thriller about the dangers of info tech. Not the best I've read.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I am of two minds when it comes to this book. The characters were wooden and I had a difficult time really caring about them. However, I liked the overall concept a great deal, regarding time travel and the altering of the future. Carr's earlier books are so fabulous that I can't help but wonder what exactly happened here. Was this an earlier manuscript tucked in a drawer that his publishers hoped to sneak out to ride on the coattails of his earlier successes? Feels much more amateurish than his Alienist books.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (1/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I simply could not connect with any of the characters in this book. Carr has a clunker in this one.

    1 person found this helpful