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Crazy: A Novel

Crazy: A Novel

Written by William Peter Blatty

Narrated by Stephen Hoye


Crazy: A Novel

Written by William Peter Blatty

Narrated by Stephen Hoye

ratings:
3/5 (5 ratings)
Length:
4 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Nov 9, 2010
ISBN:
9781400188680
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

"It's okay to love me, Joey. But don't be in love with me."



New York, 1941. Joey El Bueno is just a smart-aleck kid, confounding the nuns and bullies at St. Stephen's School on East 28th Street, when he first meets Jane Bent, a freckle-faced girl with red pigtails and yellow smiley-face barrettes, who seems to know him better than he knows himself. A magical afternoon at the movies, watching Carey Grant in Gunga Din, is the beginning of a puzzling friendship that soon leaves Joey baffled and bewildered.



Jane is like nobody he has ever met. She comes and goes at will, nobody else seems to have heard of her, and is it true that she once levitated six feet off the ground at the refreshment counter of the old Superior movie house on Third Avenue? Joey, an avid reader of pulp magazines and comic books, is no stranger to amazing stories, but Jane is a bewitching enigma that keeps him guessing for the rest of his life-until, finally, it all makes sense.



Rich with the warmth of a bygone era, Crazy captures both the giddy craziness of youth and the sublime possibilities of existence.
Publisher:
Released:
Nov 9, 2010
ISBN:
9781400188680
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

William Peter Blatty is the bestselling author of The Exorcist, which he turned into an Academy Award–winning screenplay. The son of immigrant parents, he was a comic novelist before embarking on a four decade career as a Hollywood writer, penning the screenplays for A Shot in the Dark, What Did You Do in the War, Daddy?, the Julie Andrews romantic comedy Darling Lili, and The Ninth Configuration (which he also directed), among many other films. Blatty died on January 12, 2017 in Bethesda, Maryland.


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Reviews

What people think about Crazy

3.2
5 ratings / 5 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Definitely not The Exorcist and much more my type of story. With Crazy, Blatty returns to his comic roots - Yes, he wrote comedy and humor before his world-renowned excursion into horror - with his 82-year-old former screen writer (the Joey El Bueno of the story) busy at work in a Belleville hospital bed, writing his memoirs. With time warps into the past, Blatty brings to life a bygone era of growing up in the immigrant community of Manhattan's Lower East Side, the rough and tumble nature of boys and the magic of Coney Island. I am not going to go into details as this story is one that should be experienced - kind of like one 'experiences' a Garrison Keillor book - which is also why I highly recommend listening to the audiobook version. The humour is a bit off beat and made even quirkier by Jane, Joey's mysterious friend, when she puts in her appearances. My favorite character is Nurse Bloor, the elderly Joey's diminutive 4 foot tall, stiletto wearing and wise cracking nurse. She is awesome! Given the time warps, this story tends to jump around an awful lot and left me in a bit of a muddle at certain points in the story. Overall, a fun slice of life fictional memoir with a wonderful ending that made up for the earlier, muddled bits and always nice to see a book cover that perfectly fits the story!
  • (3/5)
    I have no idea what this book is about. I can't even remember why I downloaded a copy in the first place. The premise is fairly obvious from the opening chapters, but the stream of consciousness style waffling and references to 1940s New York completely obfuscated the story for me. I caught the rhythm of Joey's reminiscing/ranting occasionally, but mostly I was just willing him to shut up. Glad it's a short book. Also, the ending was slightly too saccharine for me. On a side note, I am tempted to watch Ray Milland in The Uninvited now. The film, described in passing, sounds better than this book!
  • (2/5)
    This just isn't my cup of tea, so I didn't finish it. It was boring and sounded like a spoiled brat adult telling the story.
  • (4/5)
    Unlike some of the others who have reviewed this book, I really enjoyed it. It was quirky, but having read a nonfiction work Blatty wrote about his mother years ago, I feel I have a better understanding of why he wrote this.
  • (3/5)
    Short, quirky, occasionally funny and often touching, but not to the extent that it really deserves this cover endorsement: " 'Crazy is terrific! A wonderful novel! It's funny, touching and so full of love!' --Julie Andrews, legendary star and bestselling author." Unless, of course, that endorsement itself is meant to be part of the crazy quirky concept of this odd little novella. Why Julie Andrews would ever read it is beyond me. Who knew Blatty was known for being funny? (He wrote the screenplay for "A Shot in the Dark". Again, who knew?) I associate him only with The Exorcist which was hard to put down but had no humor in it at all, as I remember. Which brings me back to Crazy, in which I did not find much humor either. Maybe you have to have been an adolescent boy once to get it. The narrator, Joey El Bueno, tells us about his childhood from the perspective of an old man in an assisted living facility. It was a good childhood, despite being motherless. Joey had a loving, caring father, who he loved and respected in return. And he had Jane, the elusive girl who gives him spiritual guidance at unexpected moments through what he calls "time jumps" for several years during his youth. Who is she? Does anyone else ever see her? What's it all about? Well, you'll soon figure Jane out---sooner than Joey does, for sure. But beyond that slight exercise there isn't much to this story. I found it episodic, stylistically awkward and not particularly engaging.