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Christianity and Liberalism

Christianity and Liberalism

Written by J. Gresham Machen

Narrated by Ray Porter


Christianity and Liberalism

Written by J. Gresham Machen

Narrated by Ray Porter

ratings:
5/5 (19 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Released:
Sep 1, 2011
ISBN:
9781610452342
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Machen's classic defense of orthodox Christianity established the importance of scriptural doctrine and contrasts the teachings of liberalism and orthodoxy on God and man, the Bible, Christ, salvation, and the church. Though originally published nearly seventy years ago, the book maintains its relevance today. It was named one of the top 100 books of the millennium by World magazine and one of the top 100 books of the century by Christianity Today.

Released:
Sep 1, 2011
ISBN:
9781610452342
Format:
Audiobook

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4.8
19 ratings / 5 Reviews
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  • (2/5)
    Instructive.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book. Clearcut differences from what many call Christianity and what IS Christianity. The dividing line between lies and truth again is made known in this book as Manchen follows CHRIST HIMSELF. There is nothing more better than reading a book like this. All fog is cleared and the lies are seen clearly.
  • (5/5)
    Chistianity and Liberalism J. Gresham Machen The main points of the christian faith are clearly exposed by Gresham Machen in order to refute liberalism. This work, though written in 1923, anticipates the controversies faced by christian churchs in recent time, as an effect of the development of liberals ideas. Christian ortodoxy, the author points, is chistianity plain and clear. Christian faith is not a mere way of life. It is a message based on facts and with an achievable meaning. The work great merit consist in explaining the christian message, pointing to the facts in with its based and giving its meaning.
  • (5/5)
    It would appear that little has changed in the 90 years since this book was first published. Or, perhaps more accurately, the capitulation of large segments of the evangelical church to the relentless tide of what Machen termed "liberalism" has gone unchecked. Either way, the result is the same. Confessing churches have decreasing adherence to their confessions and much of what is labeled as "Christianity" bears little resemblance to the model of faith held up in the Bible.Machen knows this territory well, being on the faculty of Princeton Seminary when the trustees went all in as the philosophy we know today as Modernity swept through society. As a result, he and several of his colleagues left Princeton to found a seminary and a denomination, Westminster Theological Seminary and the Orthodox Presbyterian Church. Their purpose was to continue to teach and uphold those things which had long been essential to the church and were clearly affirmed in its confessions, such as the Westminster and Belgic confessions. Today virtually every denomination that was considered mainline in his day has rolled over to the trends driving society, and the church is infinitely poorer and weaker for it.I found much in this book that rings true, in part because I am a member of perhaps the last mainline denomination that hasn't gone completely off track. But some days it seems as if we are in a car going through a corner at high speed and with only three wheels on the ground. Rollover seems a heartbeat away. I highly recommend this book for anyone who is in church leadership and wonders about the threat to the church from the culture. It is a threat that feels more immediate today than when Machen wrote these words. Yet I also believe, with Machen, that the church itself will survive, for God has always preserved for himself a remnant of the faithful, to be his witnesses in an unbelieving world.
  • (5/5)
    So, I dug into my Presby roots a little and decided that J. Gresham Machen was made of awesome.

    It is fascinating to see how Machen makes his case that early 20th century theological liberalism and (proto-evangelical-coalition) traditional Christianity were essentially two different religions. But, more than that, it's amazing how prescient Machen seems; in 1923, he anticipated much of what has come to divide denominations today (which is fairly continuous with the early Fundamentalist/liberal skirmishes of the last century). I don't think one has to agree with his "two religions" thesis to find the book historically illuminating; and even with that argument, he's not polemical in the way one might expect. I think it's possible that the book could provide a basis for a quite interesting dialogue between theologically liberal and traditional Christians.

    I thought he was right on target in identifying conception of God and view of human sin as the two primary points of division.