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A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol


A Christmas Carol

ratings:
4.5/5 (201 ratings)
Length:
56 minutes
Released:
Sep 5, 2007
ISBN:
9781598876277
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Charles Dickens' masterfully crafted Christmas fable tells the story of Ebenezer Scrooge, a man with wealth to match the coldness of his heart. On a mystical Christmas Eve, a visitation with spirits forces Scrooge to make a choice: change, or perish.
Released:
Sep 5, 2007
ISBN:
9781598876277
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

An international celebrity during his lifetime, Charles Dickens (1812­–1870) is widely regarded as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. His classic works include A Christmas Carol, Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Great Expectations, and A Tale of Two Cities, one of the bestselling novels of all time. When Dickens was twelve years old, his father was sent to debtors’ prison, and the boy was forced to work in a boot-blacking factory to support his family. The experience greatly shaped both his fiction and his tireless advocacy for children’s rights and social reform.


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What people think about A Christmas Carol

4.3
201 ratings / 208 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    He was so fluttered and so glowing with his good intentions, that his broken voice would scarcely answer to his call. He had been sobbing violently in his conflict with the Spirit, and his face was wet with tears.
    It is hardly a surprise that the holiday arrived this year without my falling into the mood. Overwork and unseasonable weather has left me jarred -- quite removed from the trappings of the spirit. My wonderful wife bought me one of them there smartphones -- so I could join the century. I was simply pleased to be with her on a rainy morning with the thought of the trip to my family weighing rather ominously. I survived it all and actually enjoyed myself. I did not read Mr. Dickens there.

    We came home and enjoyed Chinese take-away and it was then that I turned again to the Christian charm of social justice by means of poltergeists: spectral redemption. There are sound reasons why this tale has proliferated since its inception.
  • (5/5)
    This is the way to enjoy this story – having Tim Curry read it to you. He does an absolutely fabulous job and it was just a total delight.

    For the story – I love how creepy yet still uplifting the author was able to keep the story. He has really had you feeling for past Ebenezer. I would have liked more about Bob Cratchit because he always seems so much more developed as a character in the cinematic versions of the story. I kind of missed that.

    Tim Curry gives this story a fabulous feel and it keeps you listening to very end. He gives each character a distinct voice and really does the creepy justice. Great way to enjoy a classic.
  • (5/5)
    Such a pleasure to read these lovely words! You may know the story, but until you read Charles Dickens’ own words you haven’t truly experienced the magic.
  • (5/5)
    This was brilliant, Patrick Stewart does an excellent job portraying the different characters.
  • (5/5)
    A book that stands the test of time and I read this with the approach of Christmas! A very enjoyable book even if you know exactly what is going to happen, worth worth it and it is quite a small book.
  • (5/5)
    I recently received a new version of a great classic, A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens. This particular version is illustrated by Francine Haskins with an afterword by Kyra E. Hick. This version has wonderful illustrations that belong in everyone's collection. Thank you to Kyra E. Hick for bringing this to my attention so that I may share it. Francine Haskins brings to live a Christmas Carol for ALL to enjoy regardless of where we live.
  • (5/5)
    No warmth could warm, no wintry weather chill him. No wind that blew was bitterer than he, no falling snow was more intent upon its purpose, no pelting rain less open to entreaty.
    This was surprisingly quite funny! The narration was done in that particular style that seems to have been largely abandoned by modern authors: third-person told from a first-person non-character narrator. I love this style! Many of my favorite classics (Peter Pan, The Chronicles of Narnia, etc) are told in this style, and it always lends itself a storybook quality that is sorely lacking in today's literature.

    The story itself was something I am at this point extremely familiar with, as it has permeated all corners of Western civilization at this point, but still, there were some things that are often excluded in most adaptations, such as the children of mankind: "They are Man's," said the Spirit, looking down upon them. "And they cling to me, appealing from their fathers. This boy is Ignorance. This girl is Want. Beware of them both, and all of their degree, but most of all beware this boy, for on his brow I see that written which is Doom, unless the writing be erased." (Except for that one with Jim Carrey, but it added that weird chase scene.) Those parts not oft-explored were really interesting and added a great deal of meaning to the story.

    I am quite glad I read this. This was my first Dickens experience and it has fully convinced me that I really need to read more classics! Time to read them instead of watching their BBC Masterpiece Classics adaptations!

    "There are some upon this earth of yours," returned the Spirit, "who claim to know us, and who do their deeds of passion, pride, ill will, hatred, envy, bigotry, and selfishness in our name, who are as strange to us, and all our kith and kin, as if they had never lived."
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful illustrations by PJ Lynch sets this edition above the others. The full page illustrations throughout the book helps bring the story alive with the scenes of Victorian England.
  • (5/5)
    This is a great performance of a wonderful classic.

    I think there are few people who don't know the story: Ebenezer Scrooge, tight-fisted businessman who calls Christmas a humbug and has no use for charity or kindness, goes home on Christmas Eve, and is visited by the ghost of his dead partner, Jacob Marley. Marley warns him of the fate he has been forging for himself by caring only for business and not for other people, but promises him he has one last chance at salvation.

    He will be visited by three spirits: the ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present, and Christmas Yet to Be. Scrooge is not delighted at this news, but it's not a choice for him. The spirits are coming.

    Tim Curry animates the characters with power, flexibility, and control. We feel the chill of Scrooge's office, and rooms, and heart, and correspondingly the warmth of his nephew's home and heart, as well as Bob Cratchit's home, heart, and family. We hear, and thereby see and feel, the hardships of Victorian London, as well as its life and color.

    This is a great way to enjoy this wonderful classic of the Christmas season.

    Recommended.

    I received this book free as a member of the Ford Audiobook Club.
  • (5/5)
    Every year at Christmas the kids and I reread A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens but this year I won a copy of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, Illustated by Francine Haskins and  Afterword by Kyra E. Hicks on Library Thing. This popular classic was not changed it was wonderfully illustrated with contemporary line drawings as it brings all of the characters to life as Black Victorians. The Afterword highlights over 100 African Americans, Black British and Canadian actors that have performed A Christmas Carol over the last century demonstrating this story belongs to everyone. Review also posted on Instagram @borenbooks, Library Thing, Go Read, Goodreads/StacieBoren, Amazon, and my blog at readsbystacie.com
  • (5/5)
    This has always been my favorite Christmas story. The first time I came into its presence was in elementary school in Memphis, TN (Snowden Elementary School, in fact). They called us all into the auditorium for an afternoon of Christmas movies - nothing religious, just the secular stuff - mostly old classics. I have no clear memory of any of those movies with the exception of A Christmas Carol. It was the 1938 British version with Reginald Owen as Scrooge. I remember being utterly captured by it and looking for the book to read. We read it aloud until I could re-read it on my own.A Christmas Carol is a story about redemption - how one man, who has led a selfish and greedy life that has brought him no pleasure or kinship, gets a chance to revisit his choices and observe the consequences. It's smart, funny, and, of course, very Victorian.It is also one of the most timely and relevant books all year. Forget the political reporting, the novels on current events, the magazine articles, and all the other things that have been written about the state of our economy and our political system. Just read this. It will tell you everything you need to know. From the notion that one's duty is to help the poor and ease their suffering to the punishment exacted of those who ignore this duty, this book is like a treatise on our times, on our ability to walk away from the starving on the way to our Christmas latte; on the fact that in a crushing economy there are no bread lines, no soup kitchens, no government jobs programs - just more children on the street; on the fact that most of our nation's wealth is in the hands of a very few who can't be bothered with anything in their lives other than grubbing for more money to buy their next 25,000 foot house in the country. There is also the existence of people who rise above their poverty, who find joy in the small things of life, who struggle and who sometimes die, but who maintain the giving spirit of Christmas throughout their days.I was humbled and delight by this book. It was a delight to read, as always, and amazing how relevant it is even though it was written way back in the 1800's. That's why they're classics - in case you ever wondered.
  • (5/5)
    If you live in the English speaking world and have spent any time around a tv during the month of December, you know the plot.Is the story worth reading and not just watching? Very much. It preserves the poignancy of lost time and redemption that is at the heart of Scrooge's story - even more than a religious message. Dickens addresses the reader directly, and there is more humor than most adaptations show.This edition has an interesting account of the first time Dickens read the story to a general audience - the beginning of Dickens' career in performing his work which proved almost as lucrative as the mere writing of it.
  • (3/5)
    Dickens' first, and most famous Christmas book. Short (72 pages in my Project Gutenberg edition) and lacking all subtlety as to the moral purpose intended by the author! Interesting to see a sharp dig at moralisers preventing Sunday trading, which for people of limited means of storing food, meant difficulty accessing food. Known to much of the world as the source of Scrooge as the eponymous miser; and the ghosts of Christmas past and present. Read January 2012.
  • (5/5)
    The story of A Christmas Carol is one that most of us in the Western world know fairly well... in fact, I would wager that most children over the age of 7 in the US or UK could give a pretty good breakdown of the general plotpoints with ease. But did we actually read the Charles Dickens classic to gain this knowledge? Or is your understanding of the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future the result of a film adaptation? I'm not railing against movie adaptations, as I think A Christmas Carol translates brilliantly to film... to the point where we might all know the plot of this particular story as a result of a movie that puts a twist on the original tale. My personal favorite is The Muppet Christmas Carol, though a close second is Scrooged. My only previous read of the actual text of A Christmas Carol occurred back in sixth grade. It's a short little novella and was a good introduction to Dickens, as his other tomes seemed daunting to an eleven-year-old. One can easily breeze through A Christmas Carol in a single evening, curled up by the fire with Christmas lights twinkling and presents under the tree. That said, A Christmas Carol really isn't something I would opt to re-read year after year. Here's where those film adaptations become very, very useful. You watch the Muppets, Bill Murray, Ebbie, or Scrooge and you've had your yearly dose. This year, I noticed an Audible performance of A Christmas Carol done by Tim Curry and it simply had to be purchased and immediately loaded on to my ipod. I listened to it over the course of three days, knitting a Christmas present on my commute to work. I was surprised at how few details slip through the cracks in various performances and I was comforted by how familiar the words were to the point where I could have recited many passages along with Curry. (And some of them were even ones I could do without Gonzo's voice.) The story is timeless and it's hard to imagine the holidays without this particular tale in existence, when in fact it was only published in 1843. This might be a bit blasphemous to say, but it's second only to the actual origin story of Christmas in terms of our association with this time of year. Beyond Christmas, think of the cultural contributions of this novel to our general lexicon. Think of such outstanding quotes as "Mankind was my business," "as solitary as an oyster," "there's more of gravy than of grave about you," and even "'Bah,' said Scrooge. 'Humbug!'" Tim Curry gives a fun reading with voices that are never too ridiculous. I'll admit that I hoped for a little bit more, though I'm not quite sure what. Some flash, a bit more panache, something. I've listened to Curry read the first in the Series of Unfortunate Events and that was pure magic. Here, it was certainly amusing enough but I didn't feel the same delight for which I had hoped. I'm not sure I could reconcile the visual of Tim Curry anywhere in the story but as a voice in your ear, it's a fine way to experience A Christmas Carol for the first time in its original form or as a re-telling that isn't brought out with the rest of the Christmas DVDs and tinsel each year. So on this Christmas Day, I leave you with this, quoted from memory:"And it was always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well, if any many alive possessed the knowledge. May that be truly said of us, and all of us! And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God bless us, every one!"
  • (5/5)
    Beautiful tale of Christmas spirit -
  • (4/5)
    read it every christmas
  • (5/5)
    Every year my mother, bless her heart, sends me a Christmas book. They are always written by contemporary authors like Mary Higgins Clark. Sometimes I am able to make my way through these novels but most times I give up after a couple of chapters and donate the book to my local library.The truth is there is only one Christmas book as far as I'm concerned and that book is "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens. I read this book for the first time a few decades ago and I read it most Christmases now.Why do I love this book so much? Because it is the only one I have ever read that imbues the Christmas spirit in ME just by reading it! That is quite a feat especially now that I live in Australia after spending the first 35 years of my life in Canada. So now there is no snow or Christmas lights (it gets dark here about 10:00 by the end of December) to get my Christmas spirit sparked. But Dickens does it for me every time.
  • (5/5)
    An annual reread, these past two years done out loud with the husbeast. One of my most favoritest Christmas traditions and one of my most favorite of favoritest books, actually. Never, ever grows old, and always brings a smile. Some of the best descriptions of food, crowds, the city, and parties I've ever read here. And, of course, brilliant on Christmas. A delight.
  • (5/5)
    Some tales are meant to read aloud, and never is this statement truer than when it is applied to "A Christmas Carol." One would be hard pressed to find anyone would does not like this perennial story, and we all have our special favorites, be they illustrated texts or even movies. But everyone should add this audio version to his or her collection. Award-winning Jim Dale renders a masterful performance in this unabridged version which can be enjoyed at any time of the year.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book a lot. It was a quick read that is very close to the movie if you have seen it. A solid recommendation for sure.
  • (4/5)
    I first read Charles Dickens' version of "A Christmas Carol" in my 7th grade English class. The story remains as lyrical now as I first discovered then. I cannot imagine Christmas or literature without it. The tone is nearly perfect watching Ebenezer Scrooge transform from a cold, old miser into a human being desiring another chance to give back to the world.To fully appreciate the language, I recommend listening to it or reading the story aloud.
  • (5/5)
    I finally read one of my favorite Christmas stories. I love seeing it on stage and film, but I had never read it. I enjoyed it very much. I really did. It was interesting to see the story I had always enjoyed in film or on stage in it's original, written form. Awesome.
  • (5/5)
    This was so much fun to read, especially after watching Mickey's A Christmas Carol so many times I know it by heart=) I'm sure everyone knows the story, so I"ll just say that its one of those books everyone should read, and everyone will love.
  • (5/5)
    A classis about the Scrooge and his dislike for things abut Christmas. His nephew tryes to get through to him and teach him the ture mean of Christmas. Giving and helping other in a time of need. Children can learn so much for this classic.
  • (5/5)
    I remember reading this book when I was a child. It never occured to me at that time that many movies will be produced depicting the same story but with some variations of course (this is the beauty of Hollywood). This is perhaps what makes a book a best seller the ability to survive time.
  • (5/5)
    Audiobook - I never tire of this wonderful Christmas tale.
  • (5/5)
    I had never read A Christmas Carol and listened to the fabulous recording of it by Jim Dale (he also reads Harry Potter). High recommend.
  • (5/5)
    You have to have a heart of stone not to be moved by this- but it's also very funny from time to time.
  • (5/5)
    I think everyone has heard the title and read this book.So I need not introduce the story.I have read this book in Japanese.But in English, there is another impression.I felt how wonderful to love people!And I hope scrooge will become a kind person.
  • (4/5)
    the only things taht matters to Scrooge is business and making money.and he do not have friends.on Christmas Eve he meet three sprits. and he see his past present and future.I love this story that scrooge`S change.lonly scrooge make a friends at the end .I want chance to very good change like him.