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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Written by Mark Twain

Narrated by Paul Newman


The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Written by Mark Twain

Narrated by Paul Newman

ratings:
4/5 (103 ratings)
Length:
2 hours
Released:
Jun 1, 2000
ISBN:
9780743568166
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

With his uniquely expressive voice, three-time Academy Award® winner Paul Newman vividly brings to life the exciting tale of one of America's favorite heroes. Young Tom Sawyer, full of guts and determination, takes us on amazing adventures that are both touching and humorous, and at their most compelling in Newman's warm and charismatic performance.

Produced in a simple manner that allows imaginations to soar, Mark Twain's marvelous enduring wit will charm the entire family. Destined to become an instant classic, this audiobook will help introduce your family to the unique pleasure of classic literature.

Released:
Jun 1, 2000
ISBN:
9780743568166
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Mark Twain, who was born Samuel L. Clemens in Missouri in 1835, wrote some of the most enduring works of literature in the English language, including The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc was his last completed book—and, by his own estimate, his best. Its acquisition by Harper & Brothers allowed Twain to stave off bankruptcy. He died in 1910. 


Reviews

What people think about The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

4.0
103 ratings / 139 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (2/5)
    Cruciaal is de ontmoeting met Huckleberry Finn. Vinnige dialogen; Mooie impressie van jongensachtige gevoelens en leefwereld, genre Witte van Zichem (Claes is duidelijk maar een doordrukje van Twain). Toch maar matig boek.
  • (3/5)
    Borderline 3.5 stars, but not quite. Mainly because I didn't begin to truly enjoy the story until 2/3 of the way through.

    This is the first time I have ever read Mark Twain, and wanted to read this as a precursor to Huck Finn. I respect Mark Twain and his influence on many popular authors. For me, this particular novel does not hold water against some of the other American greats (Steinbeck, Edgar Allen Poe, Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe, etc).

    A lot can be said in regards to the portrayals of African-Americans and Native Americans in the book (particularly the character "Injun Joe"), and Tom Sawyer is often censored or banned due to the language. Without a doubt, parts of the novel were certainly uncomfortable to this modern reader. I actually appreciated this, as it gives a glimpse of what life was like--from the perspective of Mississippi River dwelling, Southern, white children--in the pre-Civil War South. Racism and all. I enjoyed the satirical approach and exaggeration to some of the customs and superstitions of that community during that time period.

    Having said that, I concurrently read some of Twain's (Sam Clemens') other writings on American Indians, and it is atrocious. Product of the times or not, it left a bitter aftertaste while reading Sawyer. Hence the 3 stars.

    I do feel any use of this text in school should include a discussion on racism, fear, discrimination, freedom, etc.
  • (4/5)
    I think I was supposed to read this in college. But never did. There were more important things to do like... (never mind).It was time to make up for the mistakes of my youth and take in a classic. That the audiobook was narrated by Nick Offerman was a bonus that moved Tom Sawyer to the top of my to-read list.
  • (4/5)
    I am adding this book as one of our family read-alouds. While often read by high school students as "classic" literature, this book proved a hit with my family audience, ages 8, 14,17 and middle aged.
    It is funny and suspenseful and the characters are vivid, all requirements for making it on our read aloud picks.
  • (4/5)
    I'd forgotten what a little trouble maker Tom was. It was a nice enjoyable read.
  • (3/5)
    My advice would be to drop whatever you're reading and read this now, before you're thirty-eight and can appreciate it but never love it.
  • (4/5)
    One point less for mocking Christianity
  • (2/5)
    Cruciaal is de ontmoeting met Huckleberry Finn. Vinnige dialogen; Mooie impressie van jongensachtige gevoelens en leefwereld, genre Witte van Zichem (Claes is duidelijk maar een doordrukje van Twain). Toch maar matig boek.
  • (3/5)
    I think Mark Twain is overrated.
  • (4/5)
    My dad read this book to me as a kid and I loved it. I had the best time re-reading it as an adult - remembering parts of the dialogue I knew by heart and enjoying the social satire bits that don't always register when you're a kid. A classic!
  • (3/5)
    I really doubted this book would be a thriller, or energetic to read. This book makes you want to fall asleep while reading it. I am so sorry, but this book had so many POV'S I could not keep up. MY REVIEW; This book was a serious letdown. I thought there would be more action because it tells about a boys and his friends life in this story. NO ACTION. I liked some parts like when they were trying to find treasure and couldn't find it for like 3 chapters! No. Terrible absolutely did not like the writing. There was also different related stories to read while you finish Tom Sawyer but I decided NOT to read it.
  • (4/5)
    I had never read the Adventures of Tom Sawyer except in a childhood version in Golden Books or something like that. I skipped right over to read Huck Finn. While this is definitely a children's book in many ways, Twain writes in such a way that adults still enjoy Tom and his picaresque adventures, both as nostalgia for our own childhoods and because the adult voice of Twain cannot help inserting his snide commentaries on humanity.
  • (5/5)
    One of the books that I thought I had read but hadn't. It rushes along, adventure after adventure, capturing what it is is to be a child growing up.
  • (4/5)
    Never read this during all my school years so I thought I had to give it a shot. I was surprised. I found the book to be rather enjoyable and unlike many other "classics" that fail to live up to the hype. A great story and definitely a classic.
  • (5/5)
    Why had I never read this classic before?... who knows! But i'm glad I have now read it and will move right into listening to the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
  • (5/5)
    Always preferred this to Huckleberry Finn--which puts me on the wrong side of just about everybody else's opinion. If the ending in the caves doesn't get your pulse racing, you probably don't have one. Found a beautiful like-new copy of the Heritage Edition, with color plates and numerous illustrations by Norman Rockwell.
  • (5/5)
    This is a classic in American literature. What more can be said.
  • (3/5)
    I've returned to the river.A year ago I spent a weekend on the Missouri River attending a Writers Workshop. In typical Chris Blocker fashion, I thought it prudent to read something riverish. I selected Mark Twain's Life on the Mississippi. Thus a new association was born and once I decided I was returning to the river, one of my first considerations was what Mark Twain book I'd read this year.I was hesitant to get into the Tom Sawyer/Huckleberry Finn story-arc. I had a feeling I'd be underwhelmed or offended. I was leaning toward a different selection, but at the last minute, I decided to go with a classic. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer wasn't that bad?not as bad as I imagined it could be?but it certainly didn't impress me too much. Part of the issue is that Tom Sawyer feels slightly underdeveloped?ideas are used seemingly haphazardly and are recycled throughout the story. And part of the issue is that some of the novels better moments have become clich?. I recognize that Twain was likely the originator of some of these ideas?at least he was probably the prominent figure who introduced them into the American narrative. But I've seen enough Our Gang to know that children who play pirates will find treasure, children who fake death will convince everyone, and that little boys will always win a kiss from the girl of their dreams. It's not Twain's fault that his story has been resurrected repeatedly, but the familiarity minimized any sense of wonder and adventure I might have had had I come across this book 130 years ago.In a different time, this book may have had a much different impact on me. This is a strong story of adventure from a unique child-like perspective. Those who enjoy a little swashbuckling or hijinx will likely eat this story up like blackberry pie. (Why blackberry pie? I don't know. It just feels like something I'd expect from these characters.) With a different person, there would've been different results: I'm not one for adventure; I was never a child. It's a good, simple story, very much plot-driven, but I didn't see much else to it.Sadly, this book didn't hold to the river like I thought it would. There are a few mentions, a few explorations, but I have the notion that Huckleberry Finn is the more river-centric of the two. Will I explore the river someday with Huck? I don't know. I probably should, but I have the same hesitance I did with Tom Sawyer. Maybe I'll leave it up to the river. If it's able to pull me back another time, I'll consider it.
  • (3/5)
    For Christmas, I ordered an mp3 player (Library of Classics) that was pre-loaded with 100 works of classic literature in an audio format. Each work is in the public domain and is read by amateurs, so the quality of the presentation is hit or miss. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is a classic piece of 19th century literature penned by Mark Twain. It recounts several adventures in the life of a young, Missouri boy living in a small town on the Mississippi River. While it is at times amusing, the rural, 19th century slang and extremely superstitious beliefs of many of the characters, explained at length, soon becomes tiresome and annoying. Taken in small doses, the escapades of Sawyer and his compatriot Huck Finn can be tolerable, but combined in book length form, they soon lose their charm.
  • (5/5)
    From this novel I have learned that one can be the person who opens the door to someone in need in a time of desperation and changes his or her life for best. This message is portrayed by the characters of Will and Mr. Tom because when in need Mr. Tom provided Willie with a home, food, and most importantly of love and care he had never received from his mother. This novel contain historical episodes. For example Zach dies in an air raids. If one was not careful could die at any moment. Also, women were looked down to and were not expected to get a good eduction. This book is consider a classic in the literature. The way the story is written transport the reader to each scene.
  • (5/5)
    This book would've been given to one of my brothers at some stage and it's ended up in my possession. I'm sure no one ever read it the whole time its faded spine graced the family bookshelves. I think if I'd picked it up as a kid I would've found the dialect a bit difficult. It's only after watching plenty of TV that I have an inkling as to how those boys would've actually spoken. I must've read the first part at some stage, because the scene of Tom swindling the neighbourhood boys into white washing the fence is a resonant one.Anyhow, I'm glad I read the whole thing and can't believe it never got spoilered for me. Next I'll be cracking the spine on Huckleberry Finn.
  • (4/5)
    Tom Sawyer, orphaned and living with his Aunt Polly, befriends Huck Finn, the son of the town drunk. They, along with some of their friends, share in youthful adventures of a time and place when it was safe to romp around without adult supervision nearby. 19th century Missouri was also a time and place where racism still existed. Some will object to the terminology being used to refer to those of other ethnicities, but it can provide a good springboard for discussion if used with students about why those terms are no longer socially acceptable and about how social norms evolve. The story line with Becky Thatcher is also an interesting one that should generate discussion among readers. This was a re-read for me. It's a classic tale that while dated in some respects will probably continue to be enjoyed for some time to come.
  • (5/5)
    i absolutely loved it!
  • (4/5)
    Twain's bold themes are wonderfully depicted in this novel where Tom gets into all sorts of mischief. I love Twain's literary style and humor. Worth reading it at least once, if not more.
  • (4/5)
    This classic is a brilliant book. Mark Twain writes at his finest. It took me back to the days of getting into mischief, hastening the growth of silver hairs upon my parent's heads. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is a great book for those seeking an escape from an overly serious world with pretentious aspirations to be noticed. Tom Sawyer and his group of ruffians do a great job of reminding the reader that life isn't always about being a "someone"; its about the adventure. I highly recommend the book. Later into the next year... the sequel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
  • (3/5)
    This was okay. I really found it slow and dragging at times just like Huck Finn. I didn't really like Tom. Huck Finn is a more funny storyteller. I think this is more of a boy's book and also good for the big screen.
  • (5/5)
    In the preface to Tom Sawyer Mark Twain writes that the book is intended mainly for the entertainment of boys and girls but that he hopes that men and women will not shun it on that account.Adults, by and large, have not shunned Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn, Pudding Head Wilson, or other Twain stories with children protagonists. Kids and their parents alike will enjoy the adventures, the hijinx and tricks, the fun and make believe, the freedom of unfettered play and the torturous confinement of Sunday sermons and the one room school house. But there's a lot more to Tom Sawyer than the famous tableau of the painted white picket fence. There's real danger in Injun Joe, a near death experience getting lost in a cave for three whole days, and the heartache of puppy love with Becky Thatcher. And it may be these darker elements of the story (though not nearly as edgy as Huck Finn which deals more directly with the issue of slavery and uses the infamous N word a lot more freely) that makes this story transcend that of mere entertainment for young ones. Tom Sawyer, is a story about children, intended for children, written with the greatest respect, without condescension, with a pitch perfect ear for dialogue and character. Twain was, and may forever be, America's greatest story teller.
  • (4/5)
    At the risk of repeating myself, I have taught Tom Sawyer many times as the novel in my five-book freshman intro to lit at MA community colleges. Of course Huck Finn is the novel most taught in colleges; Huck is the son of the town drunk, just as Edwin Land who invented the Polaroid was slanderously reputed to be. In HF, Twain does get the dialects well, and Jim is so well drawn, while the subject of race is paramount. But Tom Sawyer is actually a better critique of two major American institutions: schools and churches. Regarding schools, Tom Sawyer is the best critique of English composition--or preacher's rhetoric--in American lit.It's also a good critique of forms of adventure now so prevalent in film and TV; Tom compares forms of heroic withdrawal from the world, and finds a pirate preferable:"You see, a pirate don't have to do anything, Joe, when he's ashore, but a hermit, he has to be praying considerable, and then he don't have any fun, anyway, all by himself that way"(ch 13). True, the action plot with Injun Joe etc leads to a lame conclusion more like Horatio Alger; Tom invests at 5% to his greater glory. But here in the 21st C such a conclusion still holds appeal for retired readers.The freshman course I assigned this in always involved one play like an August Wilson or usually Shakespeare's Much Ado or Measure For Measure, one book of short stories, often by one author like VS Naipaul or Hemingway of Flannery O'Connor, a collection of poems, sometimes some essays, and a novel like TS or Seize the Day or Slaughterhouse-Five or Confederacy of Dunces or Alice in Wonderland. Sometimes local author Slocum's Sailing Alone Around the World.
  • (4/5)
    The unabridged version, though racist and somewhat ignorant, looses the charm of the characters when edited. This book is an accurate reflection of an awkward time in the youth of our nation, and rather than glossed over, needs to be appreciated as such. We have come a long way!
  • (4/5)
    Looking over the reviews of this book I noticed that they swing from being 'a classic account of boys on the loose in frontier America' to 'I want to punch Tom Sawyer in the face.' One reviewer has commented on how is mum owned a dog-eared copy of this book from before he was born to after he left home to go to college (and if he doesn't want it, I'll be more than happy to take it off his hands) which made me realise how our parent's taste in literature can and does differ from our own. I grew up knowing about Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, but I have never actually read the books, and to be honest, never even realised that there was a book wholly dedicated to Tom Sawyer until a couple of years ago, and based on my parents collection of books (namely Hard Science-fiction, which is not surprising for a father who is a physicist, and detective fiction dominated by Agatha Christie) the works of Mark Twain never really entered my sphere of influence.However I recently picked up a collection of his works and decided to see what these stories were about, and I must admit that I actually quite enjoyed this tale of mischievous boyhood. Seriously, letting the entire town grieve for your death and then rocking up at your funeral really does take some guts, and I must admit that it would have been something I would have loved to have done when I was a kid. In fact, the impression that I get from this story is that it is simply Samuel Clements (using a psuedonym) recounting a lot of the mischief he and his friends got up to as children but rolling it all into one character so as to protect the guilty.There are two things that really stand out to me about this book and the first is that I found it very readable, which is something that I generally do not expect from 19th Century literature. True Clements does get bogged down into detail, but there is enough action to keep us interested, and the banter among the main characters it really enjoyable to follow, particularly when Sawyer convinces young Becky Thatcher to become engaged to him, explaining to her what engagement is from a conservative, respectful, point of view. The second thing that stood out was that it gives us a very clear view of a time gone by, an age of innocence in the American mid-west. In a way it takes us away from the troubles of today and puts us in a world where things did not seem as bad.Granted, there is a murder, and there are troubles with children getting lost in caves, but even then, we glimpse a more innocent time in the United States, though there are a few interesting quotes, such as Negroes always being liars (which raises the question of whether Samuel Clements was a southern sympathiser, despite the book being written after the Civil War, though the events are flagged as being set prior to the said war). I also see a number of influences on children's literature of today, not to say that people didn't write books for children back then, but he does say at the beginning that while this book is written for boys, he does hope that adults would enjoy this story as well.I must finish off about the story of whitewashing the fence, which is the first event in the book. Poor Tom has got himself into trouble, and has been punished by having to paint the fence, something he does not want to do, but somehow he manages to get others to do it in his stead. He does this trick (I believe) by asking somebody to pay him for the privilege, and Clements then points out afterwards that if we are paid to do something, then it is considered work, and is dull and boring, but if we pay to do something, then it is entertainment and we do it with gusto, so his theory is that if we get people to pay to do the things we don't want to do, then we will get things done a lot better and a lot quicker, than we would otherwise (and there have been movies made about how people pay to become ranchers), but I suspect that this is something that only foolish boys would do, and us adults are (I hope) probably a lot smarter than this, though I do actually wonder about it sometimes (such as celebrities paying to sleep out on the streets, seriously, if you really want to experience poverty, then give up all your riches - don't give it up for a short time, that, to me, is little more than a publicity stunt).