Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
Eona: The Last Dragoneye

Eona: The Last Dragoneye

Written by Alison Goodman

Narrated by Nancy Wu


Eona: The Last Dragoneye

Written by Alison Goodman

Narrated by Nancy Wu

ratings:
4/5 (65 ratings)
Length:
18 hours
Released:
Apr 19, 2011
ISBN:
9781423379652
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Once she was Eon, a girl disguised as a boy, risking her life for the chance to become a Dragoneye apprentice. Now she is Eona, the Mirror Dragoneye, her country's savior - but she has an even more dangerous secret.

She cannot control her power.

Each time she tries to bond with her Mirror Dragon, she becomes a conduit for the ten spirit dragons whose Dragoneyes were murdered by Lord Ido. Their anguish floods through her, twisting her ability into a force that destroys the land and its people.

And another force of destruction is on her trail.

Along with Ryko and Lady Dela, Eona is on the run from High Lord Sethon's army. Sethon has declared himself Emperor. In order to stop him, the renegades must find Kygo, the young Pearl Emperor, who needs Eona's power if he is to wrest back his throne.

Eona, with its pulse-pounding drama, thrilling fight scenes, sizzling tension - and many surprises - brings to a close an epic story.

Released:
Apr 19, 2011
ISBN:
9781423379652
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Alison Goodman is the author of the international bestselling and award-winning Eon/Eona duology and the Lady Helen series, as well as the acclaimed Singing the Dogstar Blues and the adult thriller A New Kind of Death (originally titled Killing the Rabbit). Alison lives in Melbourne, Australia, with her husband, Ron, and their adorable Australian Terrier mix, Buckley.  Visit her website at www.darkdaysclub.com

Related to Eona


Reviews

What people think about Eona

4.2
65 ratings / 54 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    This book lived up to the first one. I loved the story and how the author ended anyone who fell in love with Eon should definitely read the sequel.
  • (2/5)
    Power corrupts Eona. Lots of blood and guts.
  • (4/5)
    Character driven books like Eon and Eona rely heavily on the interactions between the members of the cast. This book features strong, well written characters who are each driven but personal motivations. Even the characters of dubious morality were enjoyable to read about and relate to. The only character I didn’t sympathise with at all was Lord Ido, because he was just so repulsive and unethical. This is not to say that the plot of Eona is lacking - in fact, I found the plot compelling and well paced. There are a few obvious twists and reveals, but they are offset by some completely unpredictable and shocking ones. One of my main gripes with the plot is the way that Eona is treated after revealing herself to be a woman. People are frequently telling her that as a woman, she is too emotional or naive to make important decisions and her opinions aren’t valid because she doesn’t understand a man’s world.Eona is an awesome book which I enjoyed reading and recommend for anyone who loves to lose themselves in masterful storytelling and riveting characters. Read more of my reviews here.
  • (5/5)
    Eon's secret that she is really Eona is out, mostly only to her supporters to keep her hidden as long as possible from Sethon's reach. But the lies and secrets in Eona's life are still ongoing. She holds back secrets that she's afraid would mean the death of her and is slowly losing herself. I could see Eona falling into the trap of believing her own lies and also having difficulty trusting her friends. It doesn't help that Lord Ido is corrupting her mind using her doubts to turn her against the people she should trust. Eona is keeping things about her ancestors from the new Pearl Emperor Kygo and feels betrayed when she finds out he's keeping things from her too. Eona as uncovered her femininity, she has come into her herself as Lady Dragoneye Eona but now in this conclusion of the series she has to learn to trust and earn trust and find out who she is as a person. I continue to be awed by the Asian influences and the epic world building. A very good concise series, not overdone or unnecessarily drawn out.
  • (3/5)
    I'll admit readily enough that I enjoyed Eona more than Eon. About halfway through Eona I realized Eona didn't annoy me anymore--I found her whiny and emotionally unreliable through the course of the first book and first half of the second. (Yes, she's a teenager under a lot of stress and pressure, but not every teenager turns to drugs when they're under stress and pressure.)

    I also came to appreciate Kygo as a more fleshed-out character. He got angry and possessive and wasn't to be fully trusted about some things. Ido's transformation from bad to good(-ish) and back to the bad guy was fun to watch, too--although I confess I didn't actually buy such an abrupt descent back into villainy. Good attempt on Goodman's part, one that was mostly successful.

    The ending also stuck with me. Not the events of the ending, per say, but where the book left off. It also felt abrupt, but I've been thinking about it and I think it was the perfect place to end the book. It was the end of the story. The only reason it felt abrupt is because there was no fluff at the end. No hints into the future--beyond Kygo previously assuring Eona, Ido and the reader that she would always be his Naiso, of course, but that's not very much compared to what both YA and fantasy readers are used to these days. In that respect, it was an unconventional ending, and I respect Goodman for it.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed this book - the world building and history in this book was really well done, but damn Eona was infuriating.
  • (5/5)
    The follow up book to Goodman's amazing Eon did not disappoint. Falling back into the world of Eona and dragons that are dying out, unless one is willing to make a sacrifice to save them all. Eona must save the kingdom when she has no one that she can truly trust and limited ability to do the fantastic events that will be required of her. I loved this book and the world that Alison Goodman created. I am truly sorry to see it end, but what an end it was.
  • (3/5)
    The throne has been usurped, and the true emperor, accompanied by the first female Dragoneye in 500 years, is fighting for his rightful place.
  • (4/5)
    In this second book everyone knows Eon is really Eona and everyone is focused on getting Kygo back in power and destroying Sethon's army. To do that, Eona has to not only rescue Ido but convince him to help her control her power and the dragons. I did like this book better than the first as I feel the first one felt more black and white and this one definitely deals in shades of gray. I was pleasantly surprised with Kinra's backstory and the true relationship between the Dragoneyes and Dragons. I really like how Dillion's character developed and Lord Ido became much more interesting. The romance was pretty predictable but not irritating or disruptive to the story. I could have done with less of the Eona romance and more of Dela's though, as I really think there's potential for a really really interesting story there. I enjoyed the ending, but wouldn't have been upset if there had been a short epilogue as it was a bit abrupt for me. I would like to see a prequel about Kinra, maybe even from Somo's POV. Overall, a good duology that I'd recommend.
  • (5/5)
    This book set is a must read! Great book about a girl kicking but both against evil and against her cultural stigmas.
  • (3/5)
    It took a long time for this sequel to come out and then it felt like it took an even longer time for me to finally get to it. There were a lot of details from the first book that I had forgotten but a lot of things that I remembered. This book doesn't retread much, so it's worth it to reread the first if you have the time.

    Based on my review of the first book, it sounds like I liked this volume a lot more. I wasn't expecting the ending, the truth behind Kinra's past, or the truth behind the dragons and their dragoneyes. I really enjoyed all the detail that went into the story.
  • (5/5)
    Eon's secret that she is really Eona is out, mostly only to her supporters to keep her hidden as long as possible from Sethon's reach. But the lies and secrets in Eona's life are still ongoing. She holds back secrets that she's afraid would mean the death of her and is slowly losing herself. I could see Eona falling into the trap of believing her own lies and also having difficulty trusting her friends. It doesn't help that Lord Ido is corrupting her mind using her doubts to turn her against the people she should trust. Eona is keeping things about her ancestors from the new Pearl Emperor Kygo and feels betrayed when she finds out he's keeping things from her too. Eona as uncovered her femininity, she has come into her herself as Lady Dragoneye Eona but now in this conclusion of the series she has to learn to trust and earn trust and find out who she is as a person. I continue to be awed by the Asian influences and the epic world building. A very good concise series, not overdone or unnecessarily drawn out.
  • (5/5)
    Much better than the first one. Very touching end.
  • (5/5)
    Wow. The author really delivered in part 2 of this duology (Eon / Eona). This week I got a little bit less sleep than I normally do! The first book has more of a focus on world-building while it sets up the history of Dragoneyes and the magic art, the kingdom, land and people. It explores gender identity and self through our main character Lord Eon, who is really a sixteen-year old girl. The second book goes so much further exploring themes of love versus loyalty, power versus responsibility. The relationships are complex, and the decisions are not straight-forward. The story is compelling, adventurous, and epic. I even got a little emotional during some parts! The one thing that might turn off some readers: if it bothers you to have to read through really detailed descriptions of clothes, palaces, food, and what-not in order to get to the action, you might end up putting the first book down before you can get to the second. If you push through, it's worth it.
  • (5/5)
    This book is so exciting and well done. Eona is flawed and alone, but so desperately wanting to do the right thing. She also wants to be loved for herself, and she so deserves it. The choices she is given are limited, the knowledge she has is limited and her experiences are backwards. She is powerful, but untrained. She is winging it the best she can under distressing circumstances and just really trying to keep her head above water. I admire her will to survive and her wanting to do the right thing, even when it's detrimental to her. Especially since she has no one she can really trust, she is a strong character and a fearless one.

    Set in this mystical world where dragons live, but are dying, this story is heart racing intense. It had me rooting for them all to make it, but especially that the right choices are made.

    A very well done book with some great characters.
  • (5/5)
    I have to say I really enjoyed Eon/Eona alot. Remember people, the book has a different title based on different countries. The US version is Eon/Eona while the UK version is different. Anyway I found Eona every bit as engaging as the the first book. I did kinda miss the city though. I really loved the architecture and Alison Goodman's way of describing everything through Eon's view. Like I said in my review for Eon I don't think I've ever read such a descriptive first person pov book before. I really liked Eon and loved her progression throughout the two books. Remember this isn't your standard YA fantasy. There are some major adult themes going on here such as Eona's dual nature, prostitution, A woman's soul born into a man's body type stuff. The ongoing themes are very adult too. I see alot of people not liking Eona's character because she makes bad decisions and gets blamed even when it's not her fault. Personally I found it very refreshing. I get tired of all the goody goody too perfect female leads or even worse yet the goody goody I'm a victim and can't do anything without big strong and dumb to protect me and will just so like kill myself if he like ever leaves me. Sorry about that but honestly Eona very much represents real life. People screw up - ALOT! I make bad decisions everyday and guess what? If you make a decision and something happens that's bad because of your decision even if you didn't know that thing would happen you get blamed. It happens at work, at school, heck everywhere in the real world. That's why I loved Eona. She was real, she didn't know all the answers and much like real life she was kinda winging it as she went. I really loved her evolution from being a man in a man's world to finally rediscovering the woman inside of her. The world didn't need another man it needed Eona but she'd buried the female part of her so deep that no matter what kind of dress you put on her she'll never fully be a woman and I kinda liked that. She'd lived in both worlds and now resides somewhere inbetween. Oh don't get me wrong she's all woman but she's also very hardened. Will fight when needed and will love just as strongly when needed.Sigh, I could go on and on all day. Read Eon/Eona. Don't pass on such a rich world with even richer characters who are very true to life. These books have so much to offer: Plot, characters, sights, smells and sounds are all in rich vivid detail. I could almost smell the Cinnamon :)
  • (5/5)
    I think I came in the second part again, definintely getting part one! This one has it all. Dragons, romance, battles, storms, family issues, reunions, loss, loyalty, betrayal, it was sooo good!
  • (5/5)
    4.5 stars, rounded up, because there were times I honestly wasn't sure how it would end.

    Stayed up late to finish; too tired to write a proper review. More to come if I feel like it in the daylight.

    PS: I didn't.
  • (4/5)
    The second book in a two book series-- I like that trend. As with the first book, I found the beginning more compelling than the middle and end. It had to end that way, of course, but at least she got some doubt and struggle in there on the way.
  • (4/5)
    Not quite as good as the first, but pretty good. A little slower.
  • (3/5)
    This books carries off where book one ended, at the brink of a war for succession as Eona is unmasked as a girl and on the run as a fugitive.

    This is a solid sequel, though I think the flaws are more apparent in this book than in book one.

    I didn't like the love triangle just because it felt a little too YA girly and I didn't always trust Eona's emotions. Readers can never be certain if it's her own emotions, Kinra's lingering emotions, the emotions from her powers, or what. It makes for an unreliable narrator and frustrated me a little.

    But again, Goodman is fantastic at writing subtle emotions. Very, very lovely scenes where we are given the space to imagine the emotions that move the character to slam a fist down or turn away from their loved one.

    However, I do have to comment on something that I've mentioned about book one and say that there are just such few characters. There are only a handful of characters that matter - and if someone has a name, they are important. I guess it's okay, but it makes for a rather empty world. And it also makes for plot conspiracies to be less complex (and thus slightly less interesting) because there are only a couple of people's intentions conflicting.

    Another thing I started noticing in the book is that the plot seems choppy. As if there are designated scenes that had to occur in order to move the plot along. There are very little transitions. In one chapter we're rescuing Lord Ido, and then all of a sudden we meet Eona's mom. It's not terribly jarring or obvious, but since this a slightly longer YA book, it becomes noticeable in the middle.

    The ending was too quick. I tend to attribute that to the lack of transition, but ugh the quick battle and sudden aims of the characters to bring the book to the end felt false. There is no resolution to Eona's conflicts on controlling people she has healed. I mean, obviously the power to do so is gone, but she never resolved the ethical and moral conflict behind those scenes. We don't see the aftermath of what happens after the loss of dragon power. And what happens to controlling the elements and natural disasters? We don't get to understand Lady Dela's grief or see how the side characters are wrapped up. I just felt there was something lacking. Like an epilogue maybe.

    Overall, a solid companion to Eon. Three stars because it was good with a couple of flaws. I don't think I would reread this series though.
    Recommended for YA fantasy readers with a good female lead. Obviously read the first book first.
  • (4/5)
    In einer Welt wo Magie und mächtige Drachengeister existieren wird ein Mädchen, Eona, geboren das sich trotz des Verbotes, dass Mädchen und Frauen keine Magie ausüben oder die Schwertkunst erlernen dürfen, sich als Drachenaugen Anwärter ausbilden lässt. Verkleidet als Junge. Dieses Geheimnis darf niemand erfahren, denn wenn es ans Licht kommt das sie ein Mädchen ist, wird dies mit dem Tode bestraft…Das Buch hat viele Chinesischen-Japanischen parallelen und spielt in einer Zeit indem ein Kaiser mithilfe von Drachenaugen regiert. Diese Drachenaugen sind Auserwählte der 12 Drachengeister die die Welt im Gleichgewischt halten. Mit ihrer Macht können sie Naturkatastrophen verhindern und so Dörfer vor der Zerstörung bewahren. Eona trainiert ihr ganzes Leben um ein Drachenauge zu werden. Und als sie ihr Ziel erreicht wird sie in eine verhängnisvolle Intrige verwickelt die ihr Geheimnis auffliegen lassen könnte. Während ihres Abenteuers findet sie ihre Vergangenheit heraus und lernt das sie dazu stehen muss wer sie wirklich ist. Ein Mädchen...-Die Macht eines Drachen,die Seele eines Mädchens,das Herz eines Helden. -
  • (4/5)
    Warning, if you have not read Eon, you shouldn’t read this review. Mild Eon spoilers ahead!

    Alison Goodman didn’t hold back in this thrilling conclusion to Eona’ story. Finally in communication with her Dragon, Eona, Ryko and Lady Dela are on the run from High Lord Sethon and his army. Together with Kygo, they try to overthrow Sethon and return Kygo to his rightful place as Emperor. There’s only one little problem, since all the Dragoneyes are gone except for Ido and Eona, and whenever she tries to access her dragon, the other grieving dragons run to her for power making her - still untrained - unable to fulfill her duties as a Dragoneye.

    While Eon had adventure and discovery, Eona is all about seeking power. Sethon’s desire to be emperor, Kygo’s quest to take over the throne, Ido looking to regain control with Eona stuck inbetween.

    I found the tension between Ido and Eona to be a little annoying, especially since it didn’t seem authentic or realistic from Eona’s side. It also made Eona seem unaffected by what happened at the end of Eon. However, the one thing I did like was that it wasn’t a love triangle for the sake of having one, but it is a love triangle that fits well inside the storyline.

    The world building is superb, and the characters are just as enjoyable as in Eon. Even though the book is over six hundred pages in length, reading it was a breeze. The plot was engaging with hardly any drag; but at the same time, not overwhelming in pace. And, what an ending! If you loved Eon, I guarantee that you will enjoy Eona as well.
  • (4/5)
    Phew, a satisfying conclusion to the duology! I liked the fact that Eona didn’t do the right thing all the time–that in fact, she did some kind of awful things. And yet, she remained a sympathetic character. I was kind of sad about the fate of one character who I secretly kind of loved. [May 2011]
  • (4/5)
    Before I talk about this book, I have to talk about the cover. Why is there a white chick on the cover? This is clearly a book set in an alternate China/Japan mashup, with Asian characters. Who is this round-eyed tall brunette? Certainly no one I was just reading about. It makes me crazy when publishers do this.

    Eona was a satisfying second book in what may well be a trilogy, as it has an ending that would be easy to move on from. There were some improbable plot leaps and some odd, throwaway bits (Eona's mom? What was that about?) but the romance/power struggles were involving and interesting. There was perhaps a bit too much agonizing for my tastes. The dragons were magnificent indeed. The Rat Dragoneye was a fully-fleshed, complex bad guy with lots of layers, I maybe enjoyed his character more than the rest. But I didn't like him, which testifies to Goodman's skills as a writer.

    I liked it a lot. Except the cover?
  • (3/5)
    a bit more muddled than the first book, in that eona doesn't undergo much character growth, and certainly not enough to fill out this thick tome. there's still a whole lot of 'oh no, I can't use my power!' angst, which we learned in the first book doesn't help the situation much. goodman has a lot of talent at writing big action scenes, though, so when the plot gets around to rushing headlong to war, it's a lot more fun.
  • (4/5)
    YOU GUYS THIS BOOK. I have been waiting for this sequel since originally reading Eon back in 2009. And it delivers!

    Picking up a while after the first book finished, I really liked how there's all of this unease going through Eona's head as she's travelling the countryside. I like how she wants to test out her new powers, but the circumstances make it impossible to do such. It's nice to see a strong female character who has to make a choice on how to use her powers, knowing how it'll affect her allies and friends. I like how we also don't know everything about the Dragoneye lore (although I would love to see more set in this world), and how that helps and hinders the characters at the same time. It's also interesting to see Lady Dela out of her element for such a long time; it shows off her other talents, but you can see that she's frustrated and wants this to be over with. Also- RYKO who is awesome and badass and just wants to protect Dela. I love him, even when he wanted to smash Eona for some of the things that she does. The only thing that I didn't like was Ido- I know he's the antagonist, but he's supposed to be more of a rounded character, especially since Eona goes through a lot just to rescue him. I felt that maybe Ido was going to redeem himself, but he still came off as a creepy, power-hungry, rapey wannabe god. Other than that, I loved this book and was very sad to see it end. If you haven't read the first book, DO IT. NOW. And then read this.
  • (4/5)
    Eona is the sequel to the book Eon. There may be spoilers in this review for the first book, but not the second.Eona is a dragoneye – someone who channels the powerful forces of the dozen dragons in the land. She is the only female dragoneye, but not everyone knows that she’s a girl because she was disguised as a boy all through her training (in the first book).In this book she’s fleeing from High Lord Sethon who wants to use her power along with some other stolen artifacts in order to rule the kingdom. Most of the story is about Eona fleeing from Lord Sethon, and of course it all comes to a head with a big confrontation.I liked Eona less than the first book, and for me I think that was because there were so many plot elements crammed into the end of this book in order to wrap everything up. I also tend to prefer stories with students who are hiding their identity (like the first book) versus the inclusion of many more fantasy elements in the sequel. The story was still good, but I didn’t feel the same excitement to rush through it like I did with the first book.
  • (5/5)
    There’s something affirming in reading about someone willing to do anything and everything to follow their dreams. However there’s always a degree of selfishness to people with such drive. In The Two Pearls of Wisdom and the Last Dragoneye, we meet Eona, who disguises herself as Eon, a eunuch with a lame hip being trained to be the next Dragoneye. A Dragoneye is liaison between the spirit dragons that guard the lands from destructive weather forces. While the new Dragoneye is set to ascend or take leadership of the Council of Dragoneyes, she is not chosen by the Rat Dragon, whose turn it is, but she is chosen by the Mirror Dragon, who has been missing for 500 years. As Eona begins to discover more about her dragon, her power and her past, she finds herself in the midst for of a battle for the throne and torn between the handsome Emperor Kygo, who has been overthrown by his sadistic uncle, and the ruthless Lord Ido, the Rat Dragoneye, who has killed all the other Dragoneyes and their apprentices, leaving the land in ruin. With Kygo, she sees the chance of lasting love and a healing for the land and with Lord Ido, she sees the pathways to limitless power and forceful of attraction. Eona’s choices will shape the future and which will she choose?

    I’ll have to admit I was a little worried reading this book. There are so many stories about the girl disguising herself, but in these two books I was pleasantly surprised to meet Eona and see her humanity. We see the selfishness and the selflessness, so she is a hero who is as we all are…flawed. These two books had me thirsting for more…more romance, adventure and dragons. I give this book 4.5/5 Nerds.
  • (5/5)
     The sequel to Eon, here we see Eona really coming into her own as an adult and one of few people who can turn the tide of war. Much more action-packed than the first volume!