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Oedipus the King
Oedipus the King
Oedipus the King
Audiobook1 hour

Oedipus the King

Written by Sophocles

Narrated by Harry J. Lennix and Full Cast

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

3/5

()

About this audiobook

In Sophocles' tragedy, Oedipus discovers that he has been caught in his terrible destiny, unknowingly murdering his father and marrying his mother.

This perfomance features a new translation from the original Greek by director Nicholas Rudall.

Starring (in alphabetical order):

  • Spencer Garrett as Shepard, Chorus

  • Francis Guinan as Messenger, Chorus

  • Gregory Itzin as Creon

  • Charles Kimbrough as Priest of Zeus, Chorus

  • Harry J. Lennis as Oedipus

  • Rod McLachlan as Second Messenger, Chorus

  • Carolyn Seymour as Jocasta

  • W. Morgan Sheppard as Teiresias, Chorus

(P)2003 L.A. Theatre Works

LanguageEnglish
Release dateJan 1, 2003
ISBN9781580814881
Author

Sophocles

Sophocles is one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. His first plays were written later than or contemporary with those of Aeschylus, and earlier than or contemporary with those of Euripides.

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Reviews for Oedipus the King

Rating: 3.0299625468164795 out of 5 stars
3/5

1,335 ratings32 reviews

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  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    A standard morality play.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    It's a classic tragedy play, I think it's great. It keeps you guessing while telling you everything. Can be hard to read, but if you take it slow and take the time to look up what the words mean, it's understandable.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    Excellent story.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    My only familiarity (which was itself limited) with Oedipus is from psychology, the Oedipus complex, etc.I was surprised to find that Oedipus received an oracle telling him of his future--and that it was his desperate attempt to avoid that future that made it come true. He did not know his true origins, if he had just stayed where he was he would have been fine--but then you can't avoid an oracle, can you? Even if the oracle itself sets it all in motion. Confusing to think about, which makes for a good story.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    The classic play that gave rise to the Freudian "Oedipus Complex", the idea that somehow all boys hate their fathers and want to sleep with their mothers. A play about prophecy and predestination, and gods that will blight an entire country because they're angry with one person, who has done something without knowing it, and is being given cryptic hints as to what has been done. Also about divine retribution and poetic justice; after Oedipus twits the blind man, he ends up himself blind and helpless. Overall, a good solid read, not too long to read in one sitting, and some interesting moments when it's possible to spot how many of the ideas presented in this work of ancient Greece are still bouncing around the modern world.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    This was one of the hardest reads. I didn't enjoy the writing at all in this particular writing, but I was forced to read it for my theater course. It was an okay read, but I would not want to subject someone else to this book. It is very sad and horrible, in my opinion.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    This is the first (in logical order) play in the Oedipus trilogy (actually, each play stands by itself) about a doomed family. This play has been called the first great detective story. Remember -- the Oedipus complex. The Oxford Press edition is a highly readable translation with helpful notes and glossary.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    The classic play that gave rise to the Freudian "Oedipus Complex", the idea that somehow all boys hate their fathers and want to sleep with their mothers. A play about prophecy and predestination, and gods that will blight an entire country because they're angry with one person, who has done something without knowing it, and is being given cryptic hints as to what has been done. Also about divine retribution and poetic justice; after Oedipus twits the blind man, he ends up himself blind and helpless. Overall, a good solid read, not too long to read in one sitting, and some interesting moments when it's possible to spot how many of the ideas presented in this work of ancient Greece are still bouncing around the modern world.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    Oedipus of Sophocles is a great work of art written by a great poet,this play symbolizes for the human misery and despair...
    the torments of the human soul,the innocence and guilt,Wisdom Out of Suffering and Fate that determines many things no matter how we struggle to change it....
    Oedipus hears about his dreadful fate from the Delphic oracle and flees from Corinth. But instead of fleeing from his fate he runs into it...

    Oedipus a passionate heart,who ask questions and take risks,has all the qualities of a great man...he has gone through sudden shifts on the course of his life and lets every situation control him....

    Despite his flaws, Oedipus is a good person who seeks the truth no matter how devastating. and who accept the responsibility for his actions.....

    At the end of the play, Oedipus accepts his fate as well as the punishment given to him ....

    He had promised to exile the one who is responsible for the plague , and he fulfills his promise even if he himself is the one to be exiled. By mercilessly punishing himself, he becomes a great hero...
    who has a Respect for Justice ....

    Jocasta, on the other hand, appears as a person who would rather control the situation. She reveals that she is more mature than Oedipus and even reveals a maternal side towards him. This is evident in the way she tries to stop Oedipus from investigating further into the mystery of his birth. At this point, she has realized the possibility that Oedipus may be her son. She would rather let the dreadful fact remain a mystery then let it ruin their lives
    The entwined sheets with which she hangs herself symbolize the double life she has led........

    Oedipus tragic position and his trial to elude the prophecies and to challenge his Fate, that was inevitable as he at last fails, but just having the courage to attempt , makes him a true hero.

    This play raises a question,when someone is trying to avoid doing things. Does he have free will or the ability to choose his own path or is everything in life predetermined?







  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    This was one of the hardest reads. I didn't enjoy the writing at all in this particular writing, but I was forced to read it for my theater course. It was an okay read, but I would not want to subject someone else to this book. It is very sad and horrible, in my opinion.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    Read this play again for my English literature class. Glad I did. This is a fantastic play and it is really relevant to modern times. It also seems to relate to conversations and thoughts I am having about freewill.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    The Sphinx: "This monster has been rated Exemplary!!" Not by a Daughter of Athena, she wasn't... :P Yet another quick, boring read for school :P
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    I believe Shakespeare looked to this particular play for many of the ideas he had incorporated in his own plays. Oedipal complex is a given, but I'm sure he got the idea to manipulate characters like Othello and Macbeth through language like the way the soothsayer entices Oedipus on until he eventually learns the truth. I'm not saying the soothsayer meant to have Oedipus learn the truth, I don't think that, but Shakespeare may have thought that was a clever way to bring Oedipus to his ruin.But on the play itself, it's a classic even older than Shakespeare obviously. If you've read Shakespeare, you should read this. At least it's short and written in plain English (well, depending on which translation you read).
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    Sophocles's fatalism is somewhat foreign to the modern reader, and while Oedipus's determination to discover the truth is admirable, it's unfortunate that this turns out to be his fatal flaw. But this is still a powerfully dramatic play even today.