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BROTHERLY LOVE

BROTHERLY LOVE


BROTHERLY LOVE

ratings:
3.5/5 (3 ratings)
Length:
2 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Mar 6, 2007
ISBN:
9780061287336
Format:
Audiobook

Description

In Philadelphia city, 1961, a division of power exists between the Italian mobs and the predominantly Irish labour leaders.

When the youngest daughter of union man Charley Flood is accidentally killed by one of the Mafia's cops it is the beginning of a suicidal chain of retaliation.

A HarperAudio production.

Publisher:
Released:
Mar 6, 2007
ISBN:
9780061287336
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Pete Dexter is the author of the National Book Award-winning novel Paris Trout and five other novels: God's Pocket, Deadwood, Brotherly Love, The Paperboy, and Train. He has been a columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News and the Sacramento Bee, and has contributed to many magazines, including Esquire, Sports Illustrated, and Playboy. His screenplays include Rush and Mulholland Falls. Dexter was born in Michigan and raised in Georgia, Illinois, and eastern South Dakota. He lives on an island off the coast of Washington. Rob Fleder was executive editor of Sports Illustrated and the editor of SI Books during his twenty years at Time Inc. He was the editor of Sports Illustrated 50th Anniversary Book, Sports Illustrated: The Baseball Book, Sports Illustrated: The Football Book, and Hate Mail from Cheerleaders, among other New York Times bestsellers.


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Reviews

What people think about BROTHERLY LOVE

3.3
3 ratings / 3 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    The story of two cousins brought up in mafia-like trade unions with violence and death which they then perpetuate into their short adulthoods. Interesting as a character study and for its Philadelphia setting.
  • (2/5)
    Not his best
  • (4/5)
    Brotherly Love has one of the most gripping, disturbing, and violent beginnings I’ve read. The violence and menace never abate throughout the story. It’s not a bang-bang mindless violence, but a grinding, wrenching threat that bursts into blackness and dissipates, until it happens again. Pete Dexter is so skillful that he keeps the tension alive the entire time.Peter and Michael Flood are cousins in Philadelphia thrown together as children by the death of Peter’s father. In fact both of their fathers have been killed because of their criminal connections. They’re a union, and organized crime, family. Michael never evolves from a greedy youngster, taking what he wants. Peter is a bright spot in the story, although he’s engulfed by the ugliness that he never really tries hard enough to escape.Nick DiMaggio, a former boxer who owns a boxing gym over an auto repair shop, is another bright spot that Peter gravitates toward. Nick has built the life that he wants and tries to steer clear of Michael and his type. “These fuckin’ guys,” “Everywhere they go, it’s like they broke in.” But he knows he can’t avoid them forever and is going to be compelled to choose sides at some point. “Maybe three times in your life something new happens and you know the right thing to do. The rest of the time…” Michael, Peter, Nick and the other characters are expertly created and believable. Dexter’s adeptly told story of inherited violence is leavened by a subplot of redemption and glimpses of humanity.