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Damia

Damia

Written by Anne McCaffrey

Narrated by Jean Reed Bahle


Damia

Written by Anne McCaffrey

Narrated by Jean Reed Bahle

ratings:
4.5/5 (37 ratings)
Length:
11 hours
Released:
May 16, 2017
ISBN:
9781543611076
Format:
Audiobook

Description

The Rowan was one of the greatest telepaths ever born, treasured by the people she saved from alien invasion—and loved by a young man who never hoped to win her heart. In spite of his feelings, Afra remained loyal to the Rowan. He stayed by her side and helped to raise her Talented daughter, Damia. Now years later, Damia is a full-grown Talent of great power. Terrible alien voices echo within her mind. And a wondrous new feeling for Afra is growing within her heart.…

In a universe under siege, only one thing can defeat the power of fear: the power of love.

Released:
May 16, 2017
ISBN:
9781543611076
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Anne McCaffrey was born in 1926 in Cambridge, Massachusetts and published her first novel in 1967. The author of the celebrated Dragonriders of Pern series, McCaffrey was known for her groundbreaking portrayal of women as heroic protagonists, and for her unique combination of science fiction and fantasy. She was the first woman to win a Hugo Award and a Nebula Award, and in 2005 was named a grand master of science fiction. She lived in County Wicklow, Ireland, in a house of her own design, Dragonhold-Underhill, until her death in 2011.


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Reviews

What people think about Damia

4.4
37 ratings / 12 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    A pleasant re-read of an old favorite, this book is much as I remember it. As much as it is classified as Sci-Fi, it is at its core a romance (remove the romance from the center of the story and the rest falls apart). The setting, which is in truth more Science Fantasy then Science Fiction, is just that, a backdrop to the developing relationship between Afra Lion, the Rowan's 2IC, and Damia, the Rowan's daughter. To spite the difference in their ages, there is never the sense of unhealthy power dynamics between them. As with much of McCaffrey's writing, the relationship is not particularly complicated, and resolves fairly quickly. A good book in a good series.
  • (5/5)
    Exactly as I remember it. Love the narrator. Her voice is amazing.
  • (1/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    The actual sci-fi plot was moderately interesting although a bit oddly paced. I especially didn't need as much longwinded rehashing of the plot of the prequel as I got.

    The romance was the type I hate most! A teenage girl and a 40 year old man who used to babysit her? He's really gross about it too, although I get the impression that McCaffrey thinks it's romantic, which frankly just makes it worse.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)
    Damia Gwyn-Raven is the third child of Jeff Raven and The Rowan. Unlike her older brother and sister, Damia is a handful. When The Rowan is pregnant for a fourth time and the pregnancy is not going well and after several shenangians by Damia it is decided that raising Damia on Callisto Station is not a good idea, so she, Jeran and Cera go to live with their paternal grandmother, Isthia, on Deneb VIII. There Damia thrives and grows into a young woman. After a lot of training she takes over as Aurigae Prime and lives a lonely life until she senses a brilliant mind light years away. Will Soran be the one to ease her loneliness?This book starts out with Afra Lyon, his childhood and how he came to work in Callisto Tower as the Second in Charge to The Rowan giving us excellent insight into his life. While I truly enjoyed this book, Damia is not one of my favorite characters until the end. I found her to be self-centered, selfish and really not very likeable. It takes a terrible tragedy to finally mature her even though she should have matured years before. The ending is a nice surprise and leaves plenty of fodder for the next book in the series. My reread was every bit as enjoyable this go ‘round even though it’s been about 20 years since I read it.*Book source ~ My home library.
  • (2/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    This book is told through the POV of the man who babysits, befriends and eventually has babies with Damia, the Rowan's psychic daughter. Boring as only McCaffrey can manage.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    From when she was very young Damia had a lot of power. So much that it became almost essential that she leave home to live with her grandmother and discover how to control her powers. She comes into contact with aliens and discovers treachery, but there's also love.I do have some problems with father figures or almost father figures becoming romantic figures, it's an almost deal-breaker, particularly when he uses a post-hypnotic suggestion, implanted when she was very young to send her to sleep when she's an adult "for her own good".Not my favourite of hers, not a bad story overall, but more joined short stories than an actual full novel.
  • (4/5)
    Sequel to "The Rowan": in some ways I enjoyed this more than the original. I especially like some of the secondary characters in this series.
  • (4/5)
    Damia is the Rowan's most difficult child, because Damia is the one who took after her mother. Ouch. Against the backdrop of a widely spread galactic civilization, McCaffrey illustrates how loneliness can be inherited. People do foolish, destructive things if they think it might free them of that particular burden.Damia grows up, and she is very likely more powerful a telepath than either of her parents. She is given enormous responsibility at an extremely young age due to the increasing demands of the ever expanding colonies and the need to utilize every prime-rated telepath available. Between this highly volatile situation and Damia's intense need for love, the stage is set for action and dramatic conflict of a high order.I really enjoyed this book, with its high emotional stakes as well as a truly frightening antagonist.
  • (4/5)
    I adored this book when I was in my early teens, and reread it so many times my copy is rather beat-up. It was, by far, my favorite in the Talents series. Unfortunately, it doesn't hold up well as an adult. While Afra is still one of my favorite McCaffrey characters, Damia is a complete brat, and the book suffers from some of McCaffrey's... interesting sex and sibling issues. The vague undertones of incest, the disturbing marrying someone who was an authority figure in your childhood, etc. While, if I recall correctly, this particularly McCaffrey novel doesn't have the rape featured in so many others, most of her other issues are clearly on display. Of course, if you've read any McCaffrey, you already know what you're getting into on that score.
  • (4/5)
    Damia is the second book in the Tower and Hive series and the 3rd child of 'The Rowan' and Jeff Raven. The first 3rd of the book over laps the time line of 'The Rowan' from the perspective of Afra Lyon. This book was mostly about a 'Talented' girl growing up into a woman and many of the choices she made and the consequences of those choices. with a double finale at the end to lead into book 3 'Damia's children'. This was an easy light book, once again very light on the Sci-Fi, but overall fun if predicable.
  • (5/5)
    Damia is a favorite from my preteen years. Yes, it is horribly cheesy and the science fiction is weak at best, but there is something endearing about the style and the loving detail to the charchter's childhoods.
  • (1/5)
    Continuation of really bad series. Don't bother...I don't know why I did.