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A Christmas Carol: A Charles Dickens Christmas Story

A Christmas Carol: A Charles Dickens Christmas Story

Written by Charles Dickens

Narrated by Bill Dewees


A Christmas Carol: A Charles Dickens Christmas Story

Written by Charles Dickens

Narrated by Bill Dewees

ratings:
4.5/5 (185 ratings)
Length:
1 hour
Released:
Jul 11, 2011
ISBN:
9781614960089
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Charles Dickens beloved Christmas story narrated by Bill DeWees, with his special inflection to make the story English but easily understood by Americans. Particularly nice to hear in relistenings during the holiday season and year around.
Released:
Jul 11, 2011
ISBN:
9781614960089
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Charles Dickens (1812–1870) was the most popular author of his day and is still widely considered the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. His books include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations, and A Christmas Carol.


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What people think about A Christmas Carol

4.4
185 ratings / 207 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Such a pleasure to read these lovely words! You may know the story, but until you read Charles Dickens’ own words you haven’t truly experienced the magic.
  • (5/5)
    This was brilliant, Patrick Stewart does an excellent job portraying the different characters.
  • (4/5)
    He was so fluttered and so glowing with his good intentions, that his broken voice would scarcely answer to his call. He had been sobbing violently in his conflict with the Spirit, and his face was wet with tears.
    It is hardly a surprise that the holiday arrived this year without my falling into the mood. Overwork and unseasonable weather has left me jarred -- quite removed from the trappings of the spirit. My wonderful wife bought me one of them there smartphones -- so I could join the century. I was simply pleased to be with her on a rainy morning with the thought of the trip to my family weighing rather ominously. I survived it all and actually enjoyed myself. I did not read Mr. Dickens there.

    We came home and enjoyed Chinese take-away and it was then that I turned again to the Christian charm of social justice by means of poltergeists: spectral redemption. There are sound reasons why this tale has proliferated since its inception.
  • (5/5)
    This is the way to enjoy this story – having Tim Curry read it to you. He does an absolutely fabulous job and it was just a total delight.

    For the story – I love how creepy yet still uplifting the author was able to keep the story. He has really had you feeling for past Ebenezer. I would have liked more about Bob Cratchit because he always seems so much more developed as a character in the cinematic versions of the story. I kind of missed that.

    Tim Curry gives this story a fabulous feel and it keeps you listening to very end. He gives each character a distinct voice and really does the creepy justice. Great way to enjoy a classic.
  • (5/5)
    No warmth could warm, no wintry weather chill him. No wind that blew was bitterer than he, no falling snow was more intent upon its purpose, no pelting rain less open to entreaty.
    This was surprisingly quite funny! The narration was done in that particular style that seems to have been largely abandoned by modern authors: third-person told from a first-person non-character narrator. I love this style! Many of my favorite classics (Peter Pan, The Chronicles of Narnia, etc) are told in this style, and it always lends itself a storybook quality that is sorely lacking in today's literature.

    The story itself was something I am at this point extremely familiar with, as it has permeated all corners of Western civilization at this point, but still, there were some things that are often excluded in most adaptations, such as the children of mankind: "They are Man's," said the Spirit, looking down upon them. "And they cling to me, appealing from their fathers. This boy is Ignorance. This girl is Want. Beware of them both, and all of their degree, but most of all beware this boy, for on his brow I see that written which is Doom, unless the writing be erased." (Except for that one with Jim Carrey, but it added that weird chase scene.) Those parts not oft-explored were really interesting and added a great deal of meaning to the story.

    I am quite glad I read this. This was my first Dickens experience and it has fully convinced me that I really need to read more classics! Time to read them instead of watching their BBC Masterpiece Classics adaptations!

    "There are some upon this earth of yours," returned the Spirit, "who claim to know us, and who do their deeds of passion, pride, ill will, hatred, envy, bigotry, and selfishness in our name, who are as strange to us, and all our kith and kin, as if they had never lived."
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful illustrations by PJ Lynch sets this edition above the others. The full page illustrations throughout the book helps bring the story alive with the scenes of Victorian England.
  • (5/5)
    This is a great performance of a wonderful classic.

    I think there are few people who don't know the story: Ebenezer Scrooge, tight-fisted businessman who calls Christmas a humbug and has no use for charity or kindness, goes home on Christmas Eve, and is visited by the ghost of his dead partner, Jacob Marley. Marley warns him of the fate he has been forging for himself by caring only for business and not for other people, but promises him he has one last chance at salvation.

    He will be visited by three spirits: the ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present, and Christmas Yet to Be. Scrooge is not delighted at this news, but it's not a choice for him. The spirits are coming.

    Tim Curry animates the characters with power, flexibility, and control. We feel the chill of Scrooge's office, and rooms, and heart, and correspondingly the warmth of his nephew's home and heart, as well as Bob Cratchit's home, heart, and family. We hear, and thereby see and feel, the hardships of Victorian London, as well as its life and color.

    This is a great way to enjoy this wonderful classic of the Christmas season.

    Recommended.

    I received this book free as a member of the Ford Audiobook Club.
  • (5/5)
    Every year at Christmas the kids and I reread A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens but this year I won a copy of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, Illustated by Francine Haskins and  Afterword by Kyra E. Hicks on Library Thing. This popular classic was not changed it was wonderfully illustrated with contemporary line drawings as it brings all of the characters to life as Black Victorians. The Afterword highlights over 100 African Americans, Black British and Canadian actors that have performed A Christmas Carol over the last century demonstrating this story belongs to everyone. Review also posted on Instagram @borenbooks, Library Thing, Go Read, Goodreads/StacieBoren, Amazon, and my blog at readsbystacie.com
  • (5/5)
    A book that stands the test of time and I read this with the approach of Christmas! A very enjoyable book even if you know exactly what is going to happen, worth worth it and it is quite a small book.
  • (5/5)
    I recently received a new version of a great classic, A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens. This particular version is illustrated by Francine Haskins with an afterword by Kyra E. Hick. This version has wonderful illustrations that belong in everyone's collection. Thank you to Kyra E. Hick for bringing this to my attention so that I may share it. Francine Haskins brings to live a Christmas Carol for ALL to enjoy regardless of where we live.
  • (3/5)
    Uiteraard erg melo en wat belegen, maar toch mooi. Licht dantesk van opbouw
  • (3/5)
    Indeholder "Et juleeventyr", "Nytårsklokkerne", "Fårekyllingen ved arnen", "Livets kamp", "Manden, der så spøgelser eller Handelen med Fantomet"."Et juleeventyr" handler om: Gnieren Ebenezer Scrooge, der bliver omvendt til et bedre liv ved at se konsekvenserne af sine handlinger. Drivende sentimentalt ævl med medvirken af blandt andre Lilletim og Jacob Marleys genfærd. Og selvfølgelig en klassiker. Dickens fik efter sigende betaling pr ord og det kan godt fornemmes. En af Æsops fabler på tre sider kunne formidle samme historie på meget kortere plads."Nytårsklokkerne" handler om ???"Fårekyllingen ved arnen" handler om ???"Livets kamp" handler om ???"Manden, der så spøgelser eller Handelen med Fantomet" handler om ??????
  • (4/5)
    Great classic story!
  • (1/5)
    A Christmas Carol is a story I've seen I don't know how many adaptations for. I recently watched the one from Doctor Who, which was excellent, but there are a lot of good ones, and it's a good story. A bit overused and overrated, but good.

    This is the first time I read the original story, and I have to say I came away sorely disappointed. This is one of those cases where the best adaptations have something that the original story just doesn't. It seems to me that some of the adaptations give Scrooge a better reason for being a dickhead than the original story did. Here he was lonely and poor as a child, and that's pretty much it. I guess that's reason enough to be a dickhead? Sure, why not. It doesn't help that we fly right through the familiar treks of the story so fast and with no time to breathe that nothing sinks in or carries weight. Scrooge's lonely childhood is summed up in a vague sentence about him being neglected by his friends. How the hell am I supposed to give two shits about his already incredibly generic rough childhood if they don't even stop to focus on the details that make it unique to him?

    This is the first time I've read Dickens, and I really do not care for his writing style one bit, which definitely put a damper on any enjoyment I might have had . It rarely evokes emotion or vivid imagery and is just...oddly worded and structured. Here's an example:
    In the struggle, if that can be called a struggle in which the Ghost with no visible resistance on its own part was undisturbed by any effort of its adversary, Scrooged observed that its light was burning high and bright; and dimly connecting that with its influence over him, he seized the extinguisher-cap, and by a sudden action pressed it down upon its head.
    I honestly don't understand how someone living today can enjoy a book that's written this way. I'm sure it was great in it's time and everything, but it's just so counter to how prose has evolved since then. It's superfluous, redundant, and overwrought.

    The weird thing is, I have no idea if it's just a product of the time, or if it's unique to Dickens. I have thoroughly enjoyed quite a lot of books from the 1800s, ala Sherlock Holmes, H.G. Wells, etc. Those books are a joy to read. They are easy to read. Their prose is clear, and elegant. Sure, they still show some signs of that older style of writing, but it's never a blockade like it is here. It never impedes forward progress, or makes comprehension/immersion any more difficult than reading modern prose would be. Those are from the 1880s or later, however, and this book was written in 1843. Perhaps that 37 year gap holds a much wider difference in prose style than I think it should? I've read plenty of books from the 1950s that seem almost contemporary, but I have no idea if that's a fair comparison. Either way, it's not much fun to read now. Not much fun at all. Bah Humbug!
  • (3/5)
    Being my first Dickens, I won't be shying away from him just yet, but I figured I'd start with a short one first. Most of us already know the story of A Christmas Carol. There are so many adaptations of it in the modern world that it's hard to escape it. When looking at the story itself, I might think to have given it almost 5 stars. But that's not all that goes into writing a book. If I had the option, I would have cut a majority of what was written into this book. Dickens seems to like listing off anything and everything, whenever he can. When establishing the setting of a scene, he wrote on and on about various things, but by the time he got back to moving the story forward, I'd given up on caring where it was set anymore. At least the dialogue was strong enough.

    So I'm torn between the story and the writing style for this one, and I predict it'll be the case in any future Dickens I try out. I might be surprised though. Time will tell. Maybe the thick books I have on my shelf isn't the author being long winded and stretching out a story for no reason. Wink, wink. Nudge, nudge.
  • (5/5)
    “I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future!” Scrooge repeated, as he scrambled out of bed. “The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me.” Before he sings such a blessed, spirit-of-the-holiday tune, however, Ebenezer Scrooge is a miserly grump living a lucrative but deplorable and loveless life. But a rather terrifying, painful, and enlightening adventure on Christmas Eve night will help him change his tune in A Christmas Carol, a tale by author Charles Dickens. Hilarious, touching, altogether delightful–I see why this story is such a classic. Well, not that I haven’t seen it before: I saw a play adaptation at the theater as a child, and the 1951 film adaptation, Scrooge, with Alastair Sim, has become a holiday staple of mine. I’ve long lost count of how many times I’ve watched the film, of which I can now say with confidence that, even with its handful of cinematic departures from the book, Scrooge captures and conveys the spirit of A Christmas Carol quite wonderfully. Ah, blessed Christmasness. And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God bless Us, Every One! THE END
  • (5/5)
    From Gutenberg, the 1843 edition, with John Leech illustrations. I decided to watch as many visual versions of the story as I could this year (on #11 as I type this - the oldest surviving adaptation, a 1901 short ... gotta love the internet), and I realized that I'd not read this since I was 13, so forty years is long enough.

    I give five stars for inspiring so many adaptations. That and so pretty good writing. "The dealings of my rade were but a drop of water in the comprehensive ocean of my business!" And things weren't much different in 1843 England than from today's tea partiers and FoxNews watchers: Dickens named a creature hidden in the robes of Christmas Present "Ignorance", crying "...but most of all beware this boy, for on his brow I see that written which is Doom..."

    Trivium point I had long forgotten: Cratchit's name isn't mentioned until Christmas Present.
  • (5/5)
    Dickens eminently accesible, immortal masterpiece.
  • (5/5)
    There's not much to say about this book that hasn't already said by many others (and said better than I am capable of). Obviously, it's a great book. It's a classic for a reason. That said, this was my first foray into Dickens, and two things struck me about this book:

    1.) I was genuninely shocked to realize that Dickens had a sense of humor! I chuckled out loud a couple of times. For some reason, I expected this to be a very serious book, and it really was not.

    2.) I was also genuninely shocked by how closely the movie adaptations follow the book...something that never happens. Granted, this is such a short book, it's easy to remain true to it. But even the Mickey Mouse version is pretty darn accurate!

    It was a great read for our December bookclub meeting...festive AND short. Glad I finally got around to reading this one.
  • (5/5)
    *** This was a reread. I originally read this book many years ago, and have seen and heard numerous variations since. This time around I listened to the audiobook narrated by Jim Dale, who can do no wrong in my eyes ears.
  • (5/5)
    Well, I don't need to tell anybody here about Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol. I might be the only person living who hadn't already read it at some point. I'll just say Tim Curry is brilliant (also not news) and he elevated the story to art. My reaction throughout the story was surprise, as I had always had the impression that Scrooge was a hostile witness throughout the first two ghosts' visits. That's what I get for comparing the real thing to a TV adaptation. Anyway, if you're looking for a brilliant audio production of a classic for Christmas, look no further than this little gem.
  • (5/5)
    A well-known and famous Christmas Classic written by the master wordsmith. This is a great book to read at Christmas time.
  • (5/5)
    What better way to get oneself into the Christmas Spirit than by reading THE Christmas story?Think about how many times this tale has been told and retold, adapted to stage and screen, and even used in multiple television shows for that one-off Christmas episode the writers just weren't in the mood to be original on (kidding... sort of...). It all comes back to Ebenezer Scrooge and the Christmas he was visited by three spirits (four counting his former business partner, Jacob Marley). A visit that would leave him greatly changed for the better. I think one of the reasons the story resonates so well is it has the power to remind us of the worst parts of ourselves as human beings, and makes sure we know there is still time to fix things if we need to. And, among other things, be kind.After this year (2016), I know that I for one needed the message Dickens provides in this classic, so I'm definitely glad I decided to read it again this particular Christmas season.
  • (5/5)
    Inhaltsangabe:Ebener Scrooge ist ein reicher Kaufmann, der aus ärmlichen Verhältnissen stammt. Seit dem Tod seines Geschäftsparnters Marley ist er noch geiziger, noch kaltherziger und garstiger geworden. Und die Weihnachtszeit ist ihm sowieso ein Greuel, denn das bedeutet, das sein Kommis Cratchit einen bezahlten freien Tag bekommt.Doch am Abend vor Weihnachten bekommt Scrooge plötzlich Besuch: Den Geist von Marley. Marley kündigt ihm den Besuch von drei Geistern an: den Geist der vergangenen, der gegenwärtigen und zukünftigen Weihnacht. Und Marley mahnt ihn, sich sehr bald zu ändern, denn sonst würde ihm das gleiche Schicksal ereilt wie ihm.Mit schlotternden Knien erwartet Scrooge die Geister und macht sich mit ihnen auf eine Reise, die ihn für immer verändern.Mein Fazit:Eine bezaubernde Weihnachtsgeschichte, die heute traditionell einfach nicht mehr fehlen darf, weder als Buch noch im Fernsehen. Schon mehrfach verfilmt, strahlt die Geschichte immer wieder eine Botschaft aus: Es ist Weihnachten, habe Mitleid, praktiziere Nächstenliebe und schieb den Groll beiseite.Charles Dickens bedient sich dabei einer sehr bildlichen Sprache, beweist zuweilen trockenen Humor und zeigt ohne mahnenden Zeigefinger die Mißstände in der zwei-Klassen-Gesellschaft auf, die damals in England herrschten und im Grunde zeitlos überall bis heute vorherrschen. Deshalb hat diese Geschichte ihren wahren Charakter bis heute nicht verloren und kann noch viele weitere Generationen zu Weihnachten erzählt werden.Dies ist eigentlich eher eine Kindergeschichte, aber ich denke, auch -oder gerade- Erwachsene haben etwas davon. Ich kann es immer wieder empfehlen. Trotz der an einigen Stellen holprigen Sprache (ist ja auch schon 160 Jahre alt) kann man es ganz gut verstehen.Von mir bekommt das Buch 4,5 von 5 Sternchen.Anmerkung: Die Rezension stammt aus Dezember 2009.Veröffentlicht am 22.12.15!
  • (5/5)
    All time favorite Christmas book. Dickens understood man's greed and avarice and disregard for society's downtrodden. Yet even while knowing so much of his fellow man Dickens still believes that humanity can change and their is hope in even the hardest of hearts. Dickens introduces the character of Scrooge, a man who has become so caught-up in the almighty dollar that he has forgotten about his fellow man. But Dickens sends Scrooge a second (and a first and third !) in the form of three ghosts - The Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future. Through their visits Scrooge discovers what he has forgotten (perhaps never known) - that love and kindness make even the worst of situations bearable. I think that Scrooge's nephew Fred is Dickens alternate ego. After reading Dickens writing I always feel like I have been to that England that Dickens knew. I can taste the hot chestnuts, the plum pudding, and the roasted goose; smell the stink of the over-crowded city, and feel the awe and wonder Tiny Tim must have felt while going to the cathedral for Christmas service and when he and his father came home to a beautiful big Christmas goose. I wish everyone could read this book and have their hearts open to the joy of giving and their minds open to miracles.
  • (5/5)
    Completed my annual reading of the tale. Now ready to keep Christmas in my heart another year.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: A classic tale about a mean old man named Ebenezer Scrooge who counts his money on Christmas Eve. He mistreats his employee. Three spirits come to visit him. Each brings with them a lesson for him to learn. The first is the spirit of Christmas past from which he revisits his childhood and who he once was. He then is visited by the spirit of Christmas present from whom he gets to see the personal lives of the people in his every day life and how he has affected them. The last spirit is the ghost of Christmas yet to come. This one shows him what his future looks like if he continues down his mean spirited path. He is then given a chance to redeem himself. Personal Reaction: A classic we all grew up knowing about either through reading, movies, or tv shows, but I have always enjoyed actually reading the classic original story. I never considered the fact before that this would be considered historical fiction until I took this class. Its set in mid 1800's. Classroom extension: This would be a little tricky per most schools do happy holidays or celebrate winter, and not Christmas itself. I could have the children reflect on their own holiday/winter memories. We could compare and contrast how they lived in that time period this was set in to the way we live today We could watch one of the movies made from this story and have the kids compare and contrast the differences from the book to the movie. To see what the director changed and kept the same.
  • (4/5)
    A classic holiday tale that I had failed to read all these years! Upon picking it up I assumed it would be boring and dull, given that we simply all know this story by heart. Surprisingly it wasn't that at all! It was alive and interesting in ways I didn't expect, and of course the language and writing style is so beautiful that I could enjoy anything written by him.
  • (5/5)
    Why did I read it? Because I enjoy audiobooks, and I also relished Tom Baker's contribution doing voice-overs on "Little Britain".What's it about? Mr. Scrooge is a miserable, friendless, mean old man, who employes one poor clerk with a large family and a crippled son to support. Christmas arrives and with it, three spirits of the season to show Scrooge the error of his ways.What did I like? Tom Baker is an excellent narrator, who breathes life into the words of Dickens like no other I've heard; Mr. Baker really made the book come alive for me, and I have read it several times, so this was a novel experience. Mr. Baker is a masterful storyteller, whose enthusiasm shone through in his performance, without over-acting or any hint of condescension in his reading. I sincerely hope he chooses to do more recordings of books in the future.Some sound effects were employed in the recording, and these enhanced my enjoyment of the story. Would I recommend it? I think this audiobook can be enjoyed by all the family, though I would suggest that it may not appeal to children under the age of 9. Better still, if you have a long drive to the grandparents for Christmas, put this on to make that journey a joy.Overall, a highly enjoyable listen which is just perfect for the winter holiday season.
  • (3/5)
    I chose A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens because I have watched many movie adaptions of the book and I wanted to see the differences between the books and the films. The book also happens to be part of my book collection and had been sitting in dust for quite some time. The book is about an old miser named Ebenezer Scrooge who owns a counting house. He’s a grouchy man who never has a kind word to say to anybody and only cares about business. On Christmas eve, he is visited by the ghost of his old partner, Jacob Marley who warns him that unless he change his way, he will suffer a bad fate when he dies and that he will be visited by three ghosts.The three ghosts show him his past, present and future to show Scrooge how badly he treated others and Scrooge reflects upon it all and becomes a better man.After reading the book, I can see why it has been adapted so many times for film or for theatre. The book has vivid imagery, it’s fast paced and a relatively simple story that it is easy to make a film adaption with little alteration to the story.I enjoyed reading the book; I thought the story was imaginative and innovative for something written in the 18th century. I was a bit worried that it would be too old fashioned, full of flowery language with passages that drag out but it was easy to read language wise and pace wise.