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The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

Written by C. S. Lewis

Narrated by Michael York


The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

Written by C. S. Lewis

Narrated by Michael York

ratings:
4.5/5 (686 ratings)
Length:
4 hours
Publisher:
Released:
May 24, 2005
ISBN:
9780060854461
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Open the door and enter a new world.

Narnia ... the land beyond the wardrobe door, a secret place frozen in eternal winter ... a magical country waiting to be set free.

Lucy is the first to find the secret of the wardrobe in the professor's mysterious old house. At first her brothers and sister don't believe her when she tells of her visit to the land of Narnia. But soon Edmund, then Peter and Susan step through the wardrobe themselves. In Narnia they find a country buried under the evil enchantment of the White Witch. When they meet the Lion Aslan, they realize they've been called to a great adventure and bravely join the battle to free Narnia from the Witch's sinister spell.

Performed by Michael York

Publisher:
Released:
May 24, 2005
ISBN:
9780060854461
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954, when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. His most distinguished and popular accomplishments include Out of the Silent Planet, The Great Divorce, The Screwtape Letters, and the universally acknowledged classics The Chronicles of Narnia. To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and have been transformed into three major motion pictures. Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) fue uno de los intelectuales más importantes del siglo veinte y podría decirse que fue el escritor cristiano más influyente de su tiempo. Fue profesor particular de literatura inglesa y miembro de la junta de gobierno en la Universidad Oxford hasta 1954, cuando fue nombrado profesor de literatura medieval y renacentista en la Universidad Cambridge, cargo que desempeñó hasta que se jubiló. Sus contribuciones a la crítica literaria, literatura infantil, literatura fantástica y teología popular le trajeron fama y aclamación a nivel internacional. C. S. Lewis escribió más de treinta libros, lo cual le permitió alcanzar una enorme audiencia, y sus obras aún atraen a miles de nuevos lectores cada año. Sus más distinguidas y populares obras incluyen Las Crónicas de Narnia, Los Cuatro Amores, Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino y Mero Cristianismo.


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What people think about The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

4.6
686 ratings / 296 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    The first in the chronicles, and probably the best of all the 7 books.
  • (5/5)
    A truly magical novel and deservedly considered a classic.
  • (2/5)
    Like The Golden Compass, I read The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe as part of my job as a course tutor for a college first year seminar on gender and leadership in young adult fantasy. This context obviously effected my experience of the book and this resulting review.I should also probably mention that while I’d never read The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe before, I knew quite a bit about it going in. For most of my childhood my family went to an Episcopalian church (think the American version of Church of England), and they loved this book. I remember being shown the old animated movie and attending a two person play (the actors represented different characters with different hats) put on in the church’s cafeteria. I remember it being stressed that not only was C.S. Lewis Christian, he was specifically Anglican, and it was something the church was really proud of. So while I may not have read the book, I came in knowing the rough shape of the story.But since everyone kept telling me to read The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, I naturally refused. What can I say? I’ve always been stubborn. Therefore, I don’t think I have the childhood nostalgia that a lot of people have for The Chronicles of Narnia. And since I haven’t read the rest of the books in this series, my comments on The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe‘s presentation of gender and leadership will be focused solely on this book.But before I get into anything else, I can see how children could love The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Even reading this as a twenty year old college student, I could feel the magic and appeal of Narnia from Lewis’s descriptions of a snow crusted world. And The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is very much a kid’s book. It’s fairly thin, and there’s not a whole lot of complexity to it (which made it much less fun to analyze than some of the other books the class read). So yes, it’s probably unfair of me to judge it as an adult reader, but just remember that experiences are subjective and star ratings are ultimately meaningless.The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe was published in 1950, and it falls in line with the gender norms of that era – i.e. it’s pretty straightforwardly sexist. The most notable example is Father Christmas telling Lucy and Susan that battles are ugly when women fight (and not just ugly in general?), and there’s other, more subtle instances as well. Like how the beavers follow 1950’s/40’s gender norms to an almost comical degree. Mr. Beaver goes out fishing to provide for the family. Mrs. Beaver cooks and cleans, and she gets a sewing machine from Father Christmas.The class spent a fair bit of time discussing Lucy and Susan. Lucy is the more active character; she discovers Narnia, she’s depicted as brave and strong willed. Susan’s a wet blanket without much characterization and whom the other children accuse of trying to mother them. What does the contrast between the two say about gender in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe? Lucy falls into less gendered patterns than Susan, but is it because she’s younger? Is the implication that when girls grow up, they become like Susan? And is that supposed to be a good thing or a bad thing? I don’t have any answers, but they’re questions I find interesting.Jadis is another character who falls into some old gendered tropes. She’s beautiful, alluring, and evil. There’s an element of the Temptress archetype to her, but she’s also sort of a perverted mother figure – she beguiles Edmund by wrapping him in furs, feeding him sweets, and promising to adopt him. The dissonance between these two roles was strange, and it goes to show how much of her character relates to her gender. I think if she were an evil king instead of an evil queen, we’d get a very different book.The class also spent some time discussing leadership, the difference between a good leader and an effective leader (Jadis certainly wasn’t good, but she was possibly effective), and whether or not Aslan was really a good leader. As one of the other students pointed out, he doesn’t really do anything. He sacrifices himself for Edmund and he’s got some magic breath, but does that make him a good leader? And why was he waiting around for these four random children? Why not just save Narnia himself? “Because prophecy” is not a good answer.I struggled with what I was going to say about The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. I mentioned earlier that it feels thin, and I stand by that. It wasn’t much fun to read as an adult, and I didn’t enjoy the analysis as much as I have with some of the other YA fantasy books the course is doing.Review from The Illustrated Page.
  • (4/5)
    It's amazing what's hidden under the covers of books. So many people think this is Christian. It's not. It's roots go much further back into secret knowledge.
  • (3/5)
    A wonderful adventure story to a new world
  • (5/5)
    The first of the Chronicles of Narnia - one of the finest fantasy stories ever. Period.
  • (4/5)
    A classic story about forgiveness and heroism. Loved it! Gives an extra dimension for Christians.
  • (5/5)
    a wonderful novel of spiritual skepticism and redemption. a classic. i could read again and again.
  • (5/5)
    one of the books that started it all for me. loved this.
  • (2/5)
    Clive Staples Lewis, Jack voor zijn vrienden, werd geboren in 1898 in Belfast. Als kleine jongen was hij dol op sprookjes, fantasieverhalen, mythen en legendes. Daarom besloot hij ze als volwassene zelf te gaan schrijven. Op zijn 16e creëerde hij al een faun die zich met een paraplu en een pakketje onder zijn arm verplaatste in een met sneeuw overdekt bos. C.S. Lewis studeerde klassieke talen, Engels, literatuur en filosofie. In de periode dat hij doceerde aan de universiteit aan Oxford, maakten hij en zijn goede vriend J.R.R. Tolkien, de schrijver van de In de ban van de ring trilogie, deel uit van de Inklings. Een informele schrijversgroep, waarvan de leden elkaar ontmoetten in een plaatselijke pub om ideeën voor verhalen te bespreken. De fascinatie van Lewis voor sprookjes, mythen en oude legenden, samen met inspiratie die hij kreeg uit zijn kindertijd, bracht hem tot het schrijven. De faun kreeg gezelschap van een witte heks en overweldigende leeuw. Hun verhaal werd Het betoverde land achter de kleerkast (The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe). Het boek kwam in 1950 uit en groeide later uit tot een van de meest geliefde boeken aller tijden. De Kronieken van Narnia waren Lewis' eerste poging tot het schrijven van kinderboeken, iets wat hem in eerste instantie afgeraden werd door zijn vrienden en uitgever. Men dacht dat het zijn reputatie als serieuze schrijver zou schaden wanneer hij zich aan dat genre zou wagen. Het betoverde land achter de kleerkast, werd ook maar matigjes ontvangen en moest het vooral hebben van mond-tot-mond reclame. Toch volgden er nog zes boeken, waardoor de ongelooflijke populaire Kronieken van Narnia ontstonden. Het laatste deel uit de serie, Het laatste gevecht, werd geëerd met de Carnegie Medal, een van de hoogste onderscheidingen in Engeland voor kinderboeken. De Kronieken van Narnia waren de enige kinderboeken van C.S. Lewis, daarna verschenen echter nog vele boeken voor volwassenen, waaronder fantasy verhalen en verzamelde brieven. Hiermee verwierf Lewis grote faam in Groot-Brittannië en daarbuiten. Op bol.com vind je alle boeken van C.S. Lewis, waaronder het nieuwste boek van C.S. Lewis.
  • (4/5)
    The one that started it all. Sure, it's Lewis so it has heavy Christian overtones...but as a kid, they flew right over my head and as an adult, although I know they're there...it doesn't make a difference one way or the other. It's a good fantastical tale and a story that challenges kids but also is manageable for younger ones. My 8-year-old enjoyed it, my 6-year-old enjoyed it more. They're looking forward to the next Narnia installment and I still have them all after 30+ years.
  • (4/5)
    Who am I to critique C.S. Lewis? I didn't like the book but I recognize an excellent work. I just don't like fantasy. It was on the Elementary Battle of
    the Books list which is why I read it.
  • (5/5)
    I really liked this.

    The Writing and Worldbuilding

    I absolutely loved the writing style! It was very similar to J.M. Barrie, with fun asides and little comments throughout. Though definitely targeted at children, it is readable and enjoyable by all.

    I loved the themes, the pacing, the world, and the characters. It was phenomenal.

    The Characters

    Peter, Susan, and Lucy: They were all so fun and I enjoyed following them and experiencing Narnia through them.

    Edmund: Freaking Edmund. He was such a good character. His arc was awesome and quite deep, actually. Definitely my favorite character.

    the White Witch: I was surprised at just how scary she actually was. Really, she was legitimately frightening!

    Aslan: I was worried that he would be preachy, but honestly he was sincerely powerful and strong and just pretty darn great.

    Conclusion

    I am so happy that I read this. It was really great. Such a funny, emotional, and powerful story. Freaking fantastic!
  • (3/5)
    You'd have to be pretty hard-hearted not to enjoy "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe", at least as a nostalgia hit. There's no surprise that it has become such a prominent part of so many childhoods, with its fascinating idea of a world reached through someone's wardrobe, where bored children on summer holiday can find white witches and talking lions. It's an ideal escapist story for kids (very much in the 'Harry Potter' vein) and - unlike a lot of today's rather bland children's literature - has a real sense of being a story that can be shared. Lewis' narrative voice is wonderful, somewhere between "kindly adult" and "co-conspirator".

    Of course, there is the religious element, which isn't so prominent here as in the later books, but which can leave an uncomfortable taste. Not that I think we should begrudge all items from other eras because of their cultural biases, but if I ever have children, I'd want to be able to explain to them why they should take the whole resurrection business with a grain of salt! Still, it doesn't take away from the childhood magic of this book, even if Philip Pullman is probably a worthy successor-cum-replacement!
  • (4/5)
    This is a great children's fantasy book. It is exciting but the focus is more on telling the story than shocking the reader. I thoroughly enjoyed this book as well as the series.
  • (5/5)
    The Chronicles of Narnia really define my childhood in so many ways. I remember being read to at night before bed as my parents made their way through each of these books and my imagination went running rampant. I absolutely adored each one of these stories, the children and their tumbles into Narnia, the lessons that they learned from Aslan and his people, and the greater implications it had on me as a reader and human being. I adore British literature, and especially children's British literature from the master, C.S. Lewis!
  • (5/5)
    This book is about four children who discover a new world called Narnia through a wardrobe. Lucy finds the world first, then Edmund, then the other two, Peter and Susan. Edmund encounters the white witch the first time he goes to Narnia and gets deceived by her. Once they all are in Narnia together, they, they experience many unique animals who can talk and have an adventure of a lifetime. This book is categorized as fantasy because what happens in the story could never happen, but it is definitely believable because of the themes of the story. Genre: Fantasy, Age Appropriateness: Intermediate
  • (4/5)
    I never read this series as a child, but reading it now as an adult with my grandchildren, I find it a rather enchanting world of fantasy. I'm glad to visit this series.
  • (4/5)
    I have seen this movie but never read the book. It is awfully close to the movie. I quite enjoyed the book, probably more than the movie.
  • (4/5)
    The latest Jeffersonian bedtime story. I didn't think I remembered very much from this, but it all became very familiar again as I was reading it with Jefferson. (Compared to The Magician's Nephew, or The Horse and His Boy, which we are reading now.) It did seem much more allegorical than it did the last time I read it. A very satisfying fable for children, with happy endings for all the Queen had turns to stone. All the darkness is erased by Aslan.

    Very enjoyable to read aloud.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite books of all time--I've read it about 30 times or more!!
  • (3/5)
    Lovely to be back in a familiar world. I was first introduced to this story through the animated movie, which I pictured while listening. I did read the novel, but it was so so long ago. I enjoy the simple style mixed with a fairly detailed story. I'm interested to see what I'll think of the rest of the series, which I've never read before.
  • (5/5)
    I have always loved The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. I love Mr Tumnus and Lucy. I think that the wardrobe was a great way to introduce Narnia.
  • (5/5)
    The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is a fantasy novel written by C.S. Lewis. The book follows a group of siblings named Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy on their travels through the wonderful world of Narnia. While in Narnia, the children learn the true power of courage and bravery when they are faced with the evil White Witch. The children, along with the magical lion Aslan, defeat the evil witch and bring peace back to Narnia. The cover design for this book features a Satyr holding a parcel. This picture in very beautiful and connects well with the contents held within the story. This book is best suited for who are just becoming interested in fantasy books. The book is an easy read, but also contains a great story.
  • (3/5)
    Siblings moved from their parents in London during World War II to the countryside discover a large wardrobe during a game of hide and seek. The wardrobe is a portal to a secret world called, Narnia.
  • (4/5)
    This is a good story, the plot is well-written, the pace is consistent, and the characters are well developed. Even as a 38 year old, I thoroughly enjoyed the book while reading this to my daughter as a bed-time story.

    What I liked:
    Lucy was my favorite character. She's strong in the story, yet compassionate. Strong female leads with compassion are difficult to write into a story, but C.S. Lewis hits this one out of the park, and I loved reading about her. Also, Jadis the queen is a strong female lead, and not compassionate. I was just as enamored with her character as I was Lucy, which I found fascinating.

    I liked that C.S. Lewis didn't sweep under the rug the transgression of Edmund. He was scolded by Aslan, and made sharply aware of what he had done. But, what is done is done. There is no reversing it, and this is a lesson that needs to be relearned many times throughout life.

    Finally, I liked the banter between Mr. and Mrs. Beaver, as light comic relief in the story. They were fun and cute.

    What I did not like:
    C.S. Lewis gets carried away many times with analogies. Not only in frequency, but in length. A couple analogies go a full page and more. To my 8 year old daughter, this was mind-boring banter, that really didn't make a lot of clear sense, and was just delaying the plot.

    He also gets carried away with obscure plant names, such as trees, flowers and bushes. In reality, these names didn't do anything for the plot. They just filled space in the book.

    Finally, some of his grammatical writing can be a bit thick. I had to revise some of the phrasing when reading to my daughter, so she had a better understanding of what was being spoken. It was times like this, that made me wonder if he really was keeping the children in mind the whole time he was writing the story, or if he forgot. At least an editor should have picked it up.

    Overall, I really liked the story. The things I didn't like really didn't bother me that badly, and I certainly did not end with a bad taste in my mouth. I would read it again, and it's an easy recommendation for others to read.
  • (5/5)
    This is the second book in the Chronicles of Narnia although it was published first (in 1950). It tells the story of four ordinary children who go through the back of a wardrobe and end up in the land of Narnia. The White Witch needs 2 boys and 2 girls to maintain her hold over Narnia, according to an old legend.
  • (5/5)
    This novel is about four siblings that have to move out to the countryside to escape the danger because of the War in London. In the house that stays at it is the home a wise professor, and in that home, they discover a wonderful and mysterious land through a wardrobe, where they have to fight many different battles and go on adventures. This book serves as a good example of showing the element of allusion through a variety of symbols, as well as an animal fantasy with the element of magic. This is because they travel to another land through a wardrobe.
  • (5/5)
    Favorite fantasy fiction of childhood.
  • (4/5)
    This is a great children's fantasy book. It is exciting but the focus is more on telling the story than shocking the reader. I thoroughly enjoyed this book as well as the series.