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The Horse and His Boy

The Horse and His Boy

Written by C. S. Lewis

Narrated by Alex Jennings


The Horse and His Boy

Written by C. S. Lewis

Narrated by Alex Jennings

ratings:
4.5/5 (302 ratings)
Length:
4 hours
Publisher:
Released:
May 24, 2005
ISBN:
9780060854508
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Narnia ... where horses talk ... where treachery is brewing ... where destiny awaits.

On a desperate journey, two runaways meet and join forces. Though they are only looking to escape their harsh and narrow lives, they soon find themselves at the center of a terrible battle. It is a battle that will decide their fate and the fate of Narnia itself.

Performed by Alex Jennings

Publisher:
Released:
May 24, 2005
ISBN:
9780060854508
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954, when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. His most distinguished and popular accomplishments include Out of the Silent Planet, The Great Divorce, The Screwtape Letters, and the universally acknowledged classics The Chronicles of Narnia. To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and have been transformed into three major motion pictures. Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) fue uno de los intelectuales más importantes del siglo veinte y podría decirse que fue el escritor cristiano más influyente de su tiempo. Fue profesor particular de literatura inglesa y miembro de la junta de gobierno en la Universidad Oxford hasta 1954, cuando fue nombrado profesor de literatura medieval y renacentista en la Universidad Cambridge, cargo que desempeñó hasta que se jubiló. Sus contribuciones a la crítica literaria, literatura infantil, literatura fantástica y teología popular le trajeron fama y aclamación a nivel internacional. C. S. Lewis escribió más de treinta libros, lo cual le permitió alcanzar una enorme audiencia, y sus obras aún atraen a miles de nuevos lectores cada año. Sus más distinguidas y populares obras incluyen Las Crónicas de Narnia, Los Cuatro Amores, Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino y Mero Cristianismo.

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Reviews

What people think about The Horse and His Boy

4.6
302 ratings / 81 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Loved this series as a kid.
  • (5/5)
    He had not yet learned that if you do one good deed your reward usually is to be set to do another and harder and better one.My good Horse, you've lost nothing but your self-conceit. No, no, cousin. Don't put back your ears and shake your mane at me. If you are really so humbled as you sounded a minute ago, you must learn to listen to sense. You're not quite the great Horse you had come to think, from living among poor dumb horses. Of course you were braver and cleverer than them. You could hardly help being that. It doesn't follow that you'll be anyone very special in Narnia. But as long as you know you're nobody special, you'll be a very decent sort of Horse, on the whole, and taking one thing with another."Who are you?" asked Shasta."Myself," said the Voice"I was the lion." And as Shasta gaped with open mouth and said nothing, the Voice continued. "Iwas the lion who forced you to join with Aravis. I was the cat who comforted you among the houses ofthe dead. I was the lion who drove the jackals from you while you slept. I was the lion who gave theHorses the new strength of fear for the last mile so that you should reach King Lune in time. And I wasthe lion you do not remember who pushed the boat in which you lay, a child near death, so that it came toshore where a man sat, wakeful at midnight, to receive you."But he looked very carefully out of the corners of his eyes to see what the others were doing (as some of us have done at parties when we weren't quite sure which knife or fork we were meant to use)The hillside path which they were following became narrower all the time and the drop on their righthand became steeper. At last they were going in single file along the edge of a precipice and Shastashuddered to think that he had done the same last night without knowing it. "But of course," he thought,"I was quite safe. That is why the Lion kept on my left. He was between me and the edge all the time."The ground between the two armies grew less every moment. Faster, faster. All swords out now, all shields up to the nose, all prayers said, all teeth clenched. Shasta was dreadfully frightened. But it suddenly came into his head, "If you funk this, you'll funk every battle all your life. Now or never."Aravis also had many quarrels (and, I'm afraid, even fights) with Cor, but they always made it up again: so that years later, when they were grown up, they were so used to quarrelling and making it up again that they got married so as to go on doing it more conveniently.
  • (3/5)
    Feels oddly out of place because there's no mention of the real world.
  • (3/5)
    I have mixed feelings about The Horse and His Boy. On the one hand, excellent adventure, great characters (especially the horses), and the sure hand of Aslan guiding the narrative. On the other...well... there's Calormen.Also, inexplicably, Shasta develops a British schoolboy's diction at the end of the book.
  • (5/5)
    The story is superbly predictable, but I loved it all the same.
  • (5/5)
    Kids and I loved this book so very much! Thanks!
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful as ever! A great narrator too! Read it now!
  • (3/5)
    Not our favorite of the series, but still an interesting political book.
  • (5/5)
    I've read other reviews saying there being no mention of the 'real world's feels out of place. I'd have to heavily disagree and say it was more immersive to have a story that takes place in the beautiful world Lewis created rather then the fantasy of leaving ours. This book helps to flesh our the world of Narnia and it's culture a lot more. It is my favorite in the series.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful! I have absolutely loved diving into Narnia! Lewis is a legend & master storyteller!
  • (5/5)
    I’ve been discouraged in my faith but this book inspired my faith all while being an entertaining story that I plan to listen to again. Excellent! I recommend it.
  • (5/5)
    Perceptive voice acting, especially the horses and the Calormenes. Completely faithful to the spirit of the text.
  • (5/5)
    Adventure is a big part I look for when looking for a book, and this extension on the Narnia books has it.
  • (5/5)
    one of my favorite of the series.
    The characters I enjoyed here more than the other books & I liked the mystery & exoctcness of the new lands desert etc
    Plus talking horses! :)
  • (4/5)
    My favorite Narnia book
  • (3/5)
    I liked this book, but it wasn't as good as others in the Narnia series. I don't really understand why the author chose to leave the point of view of the modern characters and instead focus on characters from the Narnia world. They were interesting, but not nearly as interesting as the more familiar people, and they just didn't do a whole lot. So, on to the next book in the series, The Magician's Nephew.
  • (5/5)
    Inversion of roles story, as ðe title makes clear – but what makes it great, besides being so beautifully written,is being all about grace.
  • (3/5)
    I have mixed feelings about The Horse and His Boy. On the one hand, excellent adventure, great characters (especially the horses), and the sure hand of Aslan guiding the narrative. On the other...well... there's Calormen.Also, inexplicably, Shasta develops a British schoolboy's diction at the end of the book.
  • (5/5)
    He had not yet learned that if you do one good deed your reward usually is to be set to do another and harder and better one.My good Horse, you've lost nothing but your self-conceit. No, no, cousin. Don't put back your ears and shake your mane at me. If you are really so humbled as you sounded a minute ago, you must learn to listen to sense. You're not quite the great Horse you had come to think, from living among poor dumb horses. Of course you were braver and cleverer than them. You could hardly help being that. It doesn't follow that you'll be anyone very special in Narnia. But as long as you know you're nobody special, you'll be a very decent sort of Horse, on the whole, and taking one thing with another."Who are you?" asked Shasta."Myself," said the Voice"I was the lion." And as Shasta gaped with open mouth and said nothing, the Voice continued. "Iwas the lion who forced you to join with Aravis. I was the cat who comforted you among the houses ofthe dead. I was the lion who drove the jackals from you while you slept. I was the lion who gave theHorses the new strength of fear for the last mile so that you should reach King Lune in time. And I wasthe lion you do not remember who pushed the boat in which you lay, a child near death, so that it came toshore where a man sat, wakeful at midnight, to receive you."But he looked very carefully out of the corners of his eyes to see what the others were doing (as some of us have done at parties when we weren't quite sure which knife or fork we were meant to use)The hillside path which they were following became narrower all the time and the drop on their righthand became steeper. At last they were going in single file along the edge of a precipice and Shastashuddered to think that he had done the same last night without knowing it. "But of course," he thought,"I was quite safe. That is why the Lion kept on my left. He was between me and the edge all the time."The ground between the two armies grew less every moment. Faster, faster. All swords out now, all shields up to the nose, all prayers said, all teeth clenched. Shasta was dreadfully frightened. But it suddenly came into his head, "If you funk this, you'll funk every battle all your life. Now or never."Aravis also had many quarrels (and, I'm afraid, even fights) with Cor, but they always made it up again: so that years later, when they were grown up, they were so used to quarrelling and making it up again that they got married so as to go on doing it more conveniently.
  • (5/5)
     After re-reading this book, I fell in love with it even more. What's weird about it was it made me cry. I really loved the part where Shasta was riding through the fog with Aslan beside him. It really struck a chord me and made me realize of God's love. The Narnia series will be one of the first books I will make my children read. This was really one of the best book in the series.
  • (5/5)
    This book would be good to use when talking about how to treat others as well as how important people might come from insignificant means. I thinks students will like this book because of the relationship between the boy and his talking horse.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this as a read-aloud! I enjoyed it as much as I may have enjoyed The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe had I read it before seeing the movie. The plot events inspired interesting conversations with my son: about religion, recurring themes in literature, politics, morality, etc. I'd have to say that these were some of our best religion conversations we've had so far, and I'm so thankful to have read this (thanks, Ami!).

    Unfortunately, there were some outrageously boring chapters, such as 20 pages describing the monotony of a trip across the desert. Bravo, I guess, for so effectively getting us into that place where we can so identify with the main character's desire to end it all, but really, I could've lived without it. Twice, I ended the chapter with my own commentary, "And that, thank goodness, is the end of that dreadful chapter!," to which my son would respond, "Thank god!"

    Fortunately, the book was long enough to include many exciting and/or interesting chapters to make up for it, but I do have to warn you that I don't mean "exciting" as in the Percy Jackson type of exciting (which isn't really that captivating to an adult), but the kind that is more akin to real life excitement, such as overhearing an important conversation not intended for your ears that could change everything and deciding what to do with that information....you know, real life exciting.

    I don't know that I would've valued this book as just an adult read, so my recommendation is definitely to the parent of a 10-year-old (or kids equivalent to mine in terms of maturity and vocabulary), and definitely as a read-aloud.


    This line cracked me up: "...so that years later, when they were grown up they were so used to quarreling and making it up again that they got married so as to go on doing it more conveniently."


    Should I read the next one? I'm not sure....I'd appreciate some guidance on that.
  • (3/5)
    The characters in this one seemed almost cartoonish. Seemed more of a fable or fairy tale than a fantasy novel.
    I did like how everything tied together and everything had a purpose at the end although Aslan's holier than thou schtick gets tiring.

    I enjoyed it because it was part of the series but if this was the only book in the series that I read or would read then the scoring might be even lower.
  • (3/5)
    Out of the all the books in the Chronicles of Narnia series I have read so far, this was my least favorite. I kept getting confused by the various characters' names and had a tough time staying interested in this story. It wasn't a terrible book, but it also wasn't great. It just wasn't as compelling as some of the other books in the series.
  • (4/5)
    A delicious classic, suitable for children of any age - including adults. The cultural flavor of a fairy tale or a medieval romance, with suspense and adventure, this novel can be read separately from the Narnia series, though I can't imagine wanting to skip the other volumes. Chivalry and perfidy, courage and cowardice, and a story that illustrates the fundamental importance of character - and that character is a choice.
  • (4/5)
    The most interesting, but the most troubling because of the racism against the 'dark Calormen.'
  • (3/5)
    A nice children's story. Not the best of the series
  • (5/5)
    I'm attempting to read all seven of the Chronicles of Narnia. This third book in the series was a re-read for me, but I didn't remember the story well. However, this time around, I loved the story of a talking horse from Narnia, who finds himself in a foreign land. Together with a boy from a fishing village, he attempts to get back to Narnia. Another well-told story from a master.
  • (3/5)
    The book has lots of enjoyable moments. The characters and interactions of the two horses are fun. The punishment of Radagast is kind of useful, although I expect that he would have been assassinated by his subjects or his father fairly shortly, having been rendered so powerless by Aslan's magic.As usual Aslan should be doing either a whole lot more, since he can do more, or a whole lot less, if he can't. Either way, he's creepy and annoying, just like C. S. Lewis's Anglican god, of which he is an allegory.The main characters, although not English children, occasionally use English slang, while the characters who were English children seem to have forgotten it.
  • (4/5)
    I tried reading the Horse and His Boy as a child and got lost fairly quickly in all of the eastern imagery, and so it was about time that I got back to it and finished it. There are some wonderful moments in this book: I particularly love the way that Aslan keeps on popping in and out of the storyline, looking after the young boy, Shasta, but without Shasta realising that he's been there helping him all along. At one point he wants the lion, Aslan, to leave him alone, only to find that Aslan actually wants to help him and has carried him on his journey up until that point. Shasta's character begins to morph into a wiser creature, now rooted in the mercy and kindness of Aslan. Having faith, myself, the meaning of these scenes is not lost on me. How often have I wondered whether God has been with me in a situation, but in hindsight it has been so abundantly clear that he has been there the whole time. Few stories are as enriching as this – this is not a children's novel; this is a novel for all ages.