Enjoy millions of ebooks, audiobooks, magazines, and more

Only $11.99/month after trial. Cancel anytime.

Bel Canto

Bel Canto

Written by Ann Patchett

Narrated by Anna Fields


Bel Canto

Written by Ann Patchett

Narrated by Anna Fields

ratings:
3/5 (4,681 ratings)
Length:
11 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 3, 2004
ISBN:
9780060783280
Format:
Audiobook

Editor's Note

Lyrical & layered...

When a gala for the international elite devolves into a long-term hostage situation, unexpected intimacies flourish. This lyrical & layered novel is an astonishing study of human compassion.

Description

“Blissfully Romantic….A strange, terrific, spellcasting story.” — San Francisco Chronicle

Bel Canto…should be on the list of every literate music lover. The story is riveting, the participants breathe and feel and are alive, and throughout this elegantly-told novel, music pours forth so splendidly that the reader hears it and is overwhelmed by its beauty.” —Lloyd Moss, WXQR

“Glorious.” —The New Yorker

Ann Pratchett’s award winning, New York Times bestselling Bel Canto balances themes of love and crisis as disparate characters learn that music is their only common language. As in Pratchett’s other novels, including Truth & Beauty and The Magician’s Assistant, the author’s lyrical prose and lucid imagination make Bel Canto a captivating story of strength and frailty, love and imprisonment, and an inspiring tale of transcendent romance.

Publisher:
Released:
Aug 3, 2004
ISBN:
9780060783280
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Ann Patchett is originally from Los Angeles and is a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College. She is the author of four novels, The Patron Saint of Liars, The Magician’s Assistant, Taft and Bel Canto, which was the winner of the 2002 Pen/Faulkner Award. She lives in Nashville.



Reviews

What people think about Bel Canto

3.1
4681 ratings / 271 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    A fascinating read. I struggled at times with what I thought were shallow characters, but I revelled in the book's interest in collective experience (as opposed to individual experience). It feels that the book doesn't rely too much on plot, but rather explores the barriers of language and the transcendent (and translingual) experience of music. At the best of times I felt like I was reading a hybrid of Proust and "The Magic Mountain," but at other times I felt that the collective appreciation of music and the inability to communicate otherwise stretched the bounds of credulity. Still, very enjoyable and interesting.
  • (4/5)
    Perfectly lovely tale, patiently told, even if the ending was a little rushed. It takes place in some undefined country, but it seems undefined in other ways too.

    It went on perhaps 50 pages longer than it needed, but there was enough magic to justify the raves I have read about this book over the past decade or more.
  • (4/5)
    Slow moving; great character development. Interesting concept. Seemed to be realistic, but some parts were not so believable. Too serious for me to actually appreciate any intended comic aspects.
  • (4/5)
    3.5 starsIn South America (Peru?), there is a birthday party with lots of rich people. The president of the country was supposed to have been there. An American opera singer is there. The party is stormed by guerrillas, and all the people are taken hostage. They were really looking for the president, but he backed out at the last minute and wasn’t there, so they made do with the rest of the people. The hostage situation went on for months… It was pretty slow-moving, but the story was good. Unfortunately, I found I (mostly) didn’t care about the characters. I guess by the end, I did a little bit, but still not as much as I would have hoped. The epilogue was unexpected – I’m not sure I liked it. My edition had an interview with the author at the end, so I found it interesting to discover that the book was based on a real-life hostage situation at the Japanese embassy in Peru that did last months.
  • (4/5)
    This was the coziest hostage taking story ever. It was odd, but was charming in its exploration of music and love in a desperate situation.
  • (3/5)
    An intriguing pairing - the world-class soprano, and the world-class industrialist. These two unique individuals are held hostage along with dozens of others, in Peru. I'm not sure what to make of the death of the brilliant Japanese executive, Mr. Hasokawa and the shifting of Roxane's attentions to Gen, Hasokawa's employee. Other characterizations are true-to-life, but I don't quite join other readers who praised "Bel Canto" to the skies. I can praise it, but not that highly.